Scale

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by Wad_Cutter, May 3, 2012.

  1. Wad_Cutter

    Wad_Cutter Member

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    Something I found that I thought I would pass along. I hope it helps.

    [FONT=&quot]Scale[/FONT]

    [FONT=&quot]HO Scale[/FONT][FONT=&quot]:[/FONT][FONT=&quot] This is the model train scale that has the highest popularity. HO Scale has the advantages of ease of locating paraphernalia, reasonable pricing, and a size that allows a nice layout on a standard plywood sheet measuring 4' x 8'. If you like a realistic setup, HO accomplishes this very nicely. [/FONT]

    • [FONT=&quot]Scale: 1:87[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Gauge: 0.650"[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 7 feet, 4 inches[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/3164322[/FONT]



    [FONT=&quot]N Scale:[/FONT][FONT=&quot] This is a small scale, but permits a large setup even when the available space is small. For those who prioritize the setup and the scenery, N scale works really well. The paraphernalia is small, however, and can be difficult to manipulate. Because its popularity isn't as universal as HO Scale, there are fewer equipment options with N Scale. [/FONT]

    • [FONT=&quot]Scale: 1:16[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Gauge: 0.353"[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 13 feet, 4 inches[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/3164322[/FONT]



    [FONT=&quot]Z Scale:[/FONT][FONT=&quot] If your space is very limited, Z Scale is a good choice. A large setup is possible in a limited space. [/FONT]

    • [FONT=&quot]Scale: 1:22[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Gauge: 0.257"[/FONT]
    • [FONT=&quot]Model Size to Actual Size: 1 inch = 18 feet, 4 inches[/FONT]
    [FONT=&quot]
    Article Source: http://ezinearticles.com/3164322[/FONT]