Saturn SA-5

Discussion in 'Space & Aeronautics' started by ekuth, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. Carl (Surfduke) Hewlett

    Carl (Surfduke) Hewlett Active Member

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    Too Late Erik, (but thanks for the heads up)

    Erick,

    Thanks for the information on the Jupiter. I will let my Space Club Members know Monday evening. Some have already built it, (so have I). I will tell them that we will do some rebuilds for club, and private displays, when you republish. I will not remove them from the club displays until then. Our main/big club display is in, the High School Hallway. We want to have it there for historic education, display. The other kids in school, will be none the wiser, when we swap out the models. I would again like to thank you, for all your hard/detailed, work. These models you have published, are a big help in education, of our younger club members.

    Thank you very much for all your help,

    Carl
  2. SAustin16

    SAustin16 Member

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    Good Morning Ekuth,

    One question about your current builds line under your posts...What is the J-1 engine? I know the Saturn V used the J-2 in both the Sat II and IVB. Just curious.

    I always learn something new reading all the posts here.

    Steve Austin
  3. SAustin16

    SAustin16 Member

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    Good Morning Ekuth,

    One question about your current builds line under your posts...What is the J-1 engine? I know the Saturn V used the J-2 in both the Sat II and IVB. Just curious.

    I always learn something new reading all the posts here.

    Steve Austin
  4. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Whups... you caught a typo. I meant the F-1 engine. :oops:
  5. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Whups... you caught a typo. I meant the F-1 engine. :oops:
  6. SAustin16

    SAustin16 Member

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    Didn't mean to edit your work...lol. I know of the F-1, H-1, J-2, and the never-built M-1, so I thought you might be working on something obscure. I'll have to do a little research on the J-1...kind of like researching the Saturn III stage (Von Braun started developing, then realized it wasn't necessary).

    Just started building your SA-5. Having fun, with much opportunity for detailing. Thanks again for taking all the time to design and develop this model.

    Reading your little history section on its developement brought back some old memories. You mention transport by the Pregnant Guppy. My older brother's aviation career began with the Pregnant Guppy. When I was 3 or 4 years old, I flew with my Dad and Fred III on a flight from Burbank to Palmdale where Dad introduced Fred and I to Jack Conroy. Apparently Jack hired Fred on the spot as Loadmaster. I still remember standing next to the nose gear of the Guppy looking up at the HUGE fuselage. The plane was at the time the largest aircraft in the world...at least that's what it said on the fuselage...especially to a 2 1/2 foot tall little kid. Fred recently retired as an American Airlines Captain. Funny how fast 40 years go by.

    Thanks again,

    Steve Austin
  7. SAustin16

    SAustin16 Member

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    Didn't mean to edit your work...lol. I know of the F-1, H-1, J-2, and the never-built M-1, so I thought you might be working on something obscure. I'll have to do a little research on the J-1...kind of like researching the Saturn III stage (Von Braun started developing, then realized it wasn't necessary).

    Just started building your SA-5. Having fun, with much opportunity for detailing. Thanks again for taking all the time to design and develop this model.

    Reading your little history section on its developement brought back some old memories. You mention transport by the Pregnant Guppy. My older brother's aviation career began with the Pregnant Guppy. When I was 3 or 4 years old, I flew with my Dad and Fred III on a flight from Burbank to Palmdale where Dad introduced Fred and I to Jack Conroy. Apparently Jack hired Fred on the spot as Loadmaster. I still remember standing next to the nose gear of the Guppy looking up at the HUGE fuselage. The plane was at the time the largest aircraft in the world...at least that's what it said on the fuselage...especially to a 2 1/2 foot tall little kid. Fred recently retired as an American Airlines Captain. Funny how fast 40 years go by.

    Thanks again,

    Steve Austin
  8. Nando

    Nando Designer Extraordinaire

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    The black holes in the inter stage

    Hi Ekuth,
    I am new for the forum and I am fascinated for the beauty and the detail of your model. The Saturn missile, in its several versions, has been always my preferred one, therefore I did some research about the question of to fill or not the "black" gaps present at the base of the inter-stage.

    So I captured some stills from the “The Mighty Saturns - Saturn I and IB” DVD, in particular from SA-5 and SA-6 launches (sorry for the poor quality). In the SA-5 launch it seems that the “black filler” isn’t a shadow but a true filler (you cannot see the background through the holes), that corrects the previous intention of to leave the gaps open . The impression is confirmed by the still of the SA-6 launch, in which we can see this time a light gray true filler. I tried to highlight the areas I described with red circles.

    So, if I’m not wrong, You can build the SA-5 model also with the “black-filler” and not only with the gaps. In this case, You can at most to build the filler with a black cylinder inside the inter-stage’s gaps.

    Now I’m busy with other models, but your SA-5 is the first of my to-do list :grin: .

    I apologize for my English….

    The best

    Attached Files:

  9. Nando

    Nando Designer Extraordinaire

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    The black holes in the inter stage

    Hi Ekuth,
    I am new for the forum and I am fascinated for the beauty and the detail of your model. The Saturn missile, in its several versions, has been always my preferred one, therefore I did some research about the question of to fill or not the "black" gaps present at the base of the inter-stage.

    So I captured some stills from the “The Mighty Saturns - Saturn I and IB” DVD, in particular from SA-5 and SA-6 launches (sorry for the poor quality). In the SA-5 launch it seems that the “black filler” isn’t a shadow but a true filler (you cannot see the background through the holes), that corrects the previous intention of to leave the gaps open . The impression is confirmed by the still of the SA-6 launch, in which we can see this time a light gray true filler. I tried to highlight the areas I described with red circles.

    So, if I’m not wrong, You can build the SA-5 model also with the “black-filler” and not only with the gaps. In this case, You can at most to build the filler with a black cylinder inside the inter-stage’s gaps.

    Now I’m busy with other models, but your SA-5 is the first of my to-do list :grin: .

    I apologize for my English….

    The best
  10. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Fantastic work Ekuth.

    Attached is a great photo of the interstage.

    [​IMG]

    I think the only difference is the checkerboard pattern that was on the SA-5 interstage.

    I hope this is of some use to you.

    Reference page--Link Here-
  11. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Fantastic work Ekuth.

    Attached is a great photo of the interstage.

    [​IMG]

    I think the only difference is the checkerboard pattern that was on the SA-5 interstage.

    I hope this is of some use to you.

    Reference page--Link Here-
  12. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Wow. Perfect picture McPeek. Definate proof that those areas are in fact hollow.

    Looking at the alignment of arches and engines on the Jupiter nosecone, you can clearly see that the areas were opened to provide a smoother separation and deflect the majority of backlash from exhaust.

    May I ask where you found this? I'd love to see more shots like this.
  13. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Wow. Perfect picture McPeek. Definate proof that those areas are in fact hollow.

    Looking at the alignment of arches and engines on the Jupiter nosecone, you can clearly see that the areas were opened to provide a smoother separation and deflect the majority of backlash from exhaust.

    May I ask where you found this? I'd love to see more shots like this.
  14. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    LOL. Whups. Should have read more closely. Thanks for the link. :-D
  15. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    LOL. Whups. Should have read more closely. Thanks for the link. :-D
  16. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Your welcome and glad I could be of some help.
  17. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Your welcome and glad I could be of some help.
  18. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Here is one more photo that may be of interest.

    It is labled, "Saturn 1 second stage production".

    I wont post the picture here, but click the link provided below.

    Photo-Click Here-

    Nasa illustrations page--Click Here- Image#169
  19. McPeek

    McPeek Member

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    Here is one more photo that may be of interest.

    It is labled, "Saturn 1 second stage production".

    I wont post the picture here, but click the link provided below.

    Photo-Click Here-

    Nasa illustrations page--Click Here- Image#169
  20. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Thanks McPeek- the NASA Illustrations page link decisively answered this question for us:

    View attachment 3356

    You can see on the left side of the illustration that the area in question are Blowout Panels.

    I'm assuming that the panels were designed to break away during separations, which would make more sense from an aerodynamic standpoint. Without the panels in place, the airstream would tend to cause turbulence in that area...

    So, you could model it either way- solid or with the blowout panels removed.

    *bows to McPeek's research skills*

    I'm pleased with how many details I was able to get right by studying the photographs I had access to, though... of course now I have more things to do to make a completely authentic model. :roll:

    Attached Files: