S-curve question

Discussion in 'Track Planning' started by GP18m, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. GP18m

    GP18m New Member

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    Hi,

    Below is a picture of a curve to a parallel track. I'm asking for opinions considering the s-curve in it. Equipment is geeps, 40' & 50' cars.

    Thanks

    Attached Files:

  2. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    In so many cases, layouts don't have enough room to adequately handle large radius curves, so we are restricted to what doesn't always look good. That in mind, does it work? YES- keep it NO-try to go to a bigger radius, if possible.
    If it isn't installed yet, tack it down on foam or cork, and see if your locos can handle it. The cost of sectional track is not so high that something like this can be tested, off layout, before it is installed.
  3. jetrock

    jetrock Member

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    It seems like a fairly gentle S-curve to me, as long as you aren't sailing into it at breakneck speeds.
  4. wdsrwg

    wdsrwg Member

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    I have several curves similar to this in my switching yard.
    All come off of radius curves that will not allow for
    anything but slower speeds to enter.
    The biggest problem I have encountered is the
    binding I will sometimes get on some of my
    rolling stock. this can be fixed with some modifications.
    You are doing just fine. Heck, I have s curves,
    u curves a few g curves and a T curve. :D
    Just kidding. Lay it down and see what happens.
    Best=it works fine.
    Worst=pull up the pins and try something different! :rolleyes:

    Russell
  5. phoneguy

    phoneguy member

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    A number 6 crossover will work out to about 2" straight and a 46" curve when you substitute for one of the switches. I use a 3" straight and a 32" curve and that works good.
  6. GP18m

    GP18m New Member

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    Thanks for your answers.

    Another question came to my mind. I have aimed for the straight section between curves to be as long as possible, that makes the curves in the end sharper, right? But which is better considering the s-curves effect, longer straight or gentler curves?
  7. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    It depends on what the "S" curve leads into. If that is a second mainline diverging from one (like the Keddie WYE on the W.P.), make the curve as gentile as possible. If it is a passing siding, the key is that it should fit the entire train on the siding without fowling the main on either end. Whether the siding is straight or curved makes no difference, so if you can curve it and ease the "S" curve, do it. If it is an entrance to an industry, and you are going to use only 40-50 foot cars and gp type loicomotives, it will work fine. You are not going to go through it at high speed anyway.