RR Merlin 45 1:33

Discussion in 'Internet Finds' started by joek2, Nov 25, 2007.

  1. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    Wow. Thank you!

    Here's the revised placard.

    Attached Files:

  2. Patty

    Patty King of Swaziland

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    Hmm an engine, then a mount, then a cockpit, then maybe a fuselage to put it in. Maybe with wings to help display the fusalage? If only SOMEONE ( hint hint) would do that. Thanks for the link and placard.
  3. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    Whoa, Patty! I may be crazy, but I'm not THAT crazy!

    Or maybe I am. We'll see. . .

    No worries,
    --David
  4. Patty

    Patty King of Swaziland

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    If you were THAT crazy, you would be in a mental asylum. So so tempting... you know you wanna...
  5. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    I do, I do, I do. . . wall1

    Oh, well. Building the engine in 1:16 scale has so far involved a fair amount of scratchbuilding to add details that aren't so conspicuous in 1/33, and some re-engineering to ensure that the finished model is sturdy enough to hold its shape. I expect that doing the cockpit will require more of the same. This is definitely not a project for sissies.

    I have several good cutaway drawings and access to a Spitfire Mk.IX at the EAA Museum. (The curator will allow me to crawl around inside with my camera and a tape measure, if I need to. I've written the text for a lot of the permanent exhibits there.)

    I'll attempt the cockpit, cut away or partly unskinned, in 1/16.5. The rest of the airplane, I will leave for some other poor, obsessive-compulsive S.O.B. to model in that scale. For one thing, I'd like the finished product to fit on my desk. (Okay, so a 1/16 scale Spit would fit on my desk, but it wouldn't leave room for anything else, like work. . . . . Hm. Is that bad?

    By the way, we raised two teenage daughters here not long ago. How exactly would a mental asylum be different?

    No worries (well, not very many, anyway),
    --David
  6. Patty

    Patty King of Swaziland

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    Errr, forget a WHOLE spitfire, what about a cutaway spitfire, only MOST of a spitfire. :twisted: I might have to use this in a plastic model i am using... :eek:Yes... i said plastic. I am bimedial (use to different types of construction media) oh, BTW this isn't paper, but i thought it was incredible. http://hsfeatures.com/features04/spitfiremkidg_1.htm I know the engine is for a mk.5 and this is a mk. 1, but still might be useful.
  7. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    What I'm thinking of is something like this, with engine exposed, canopy and side hatch open, and about a half inch of wing root on each side.

    I don't have the Halinski kit yet. When it arrives (in the next few days), I'll do some more thinking about it.

    I just downloaded Alin's Daimler-Benz 601 (Me-109, 110, etc.). I think I see another 1:16 scale engine project in my future. wall1

    Cheers,
    --David

    P.S.: I just noticed that Alin's Merlin Kit does not include exhaust tubes. I'm going to have to make my own. Oh goody.:p

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  8. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    David, there is a technique for making exhaust tubes from plated metal that is quite simple to execute, certainly more so that with paper. If you have any interest, I can scan the article and email it to you. It opens up a whole new world of modeling, too!
  9. Alin

    Alin New Member

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    Hello ,David , fantastic build my engine Merlin.:thumb::thumb:

    My other engine project -Jumo 004 scale1/33

    [​IMG]

    My supplement for 1/33 scale aircraft- PSP airfield planking

    [​IMG]

    Download:psp.pdf - 17.00MB


    Sorry, my english very bad
  10. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    Alin, where did the Jumo jet engine come from? It's a beauty!
  11. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    Alin, I see that you have a website! Please send it for others. The PSP is an excellent download! Thank you very much!
  12. Alin

    Alin New Member

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    Rendering of my 3D model from basis card model

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

  13. Lex

    Lex Dollmaker

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    Nice to meet you Alin!! Your models have never failed to impress!! Looking forward to the Jumo.

    --And also, did you design the hull for HMS Hood?
  14. Alin

    Alin New Member

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    Yes, HMS Hood is my project, mine long - term project . Completed frames of hull, completed 3D model, work on superstructure and details

    [​IMG]
  15. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    Alin,
    Thanks for the PSP (also known as "Marston Mat"). It's a very welcome addition to the carrier decks, hardstands, and other display bases already available.:thumb: It would also make an interesting load for a 1/25 scale "Deuce-and-a-Half."
    No worries,
    --David
  16. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    A note on PSP for those of you not familiar with it:
    Pierced steel planking (PSP), also known as “Marston Mat,” was developed during World War II as a way of quickly laying down a smooth, stable surface for a runway, taxiway, or parking area on soft or unstable ground. When laid on a stabilized subsurface, PSP could provide a semi permanent runway. It was used in every theater of operations in World War II and again in the Korean War, and remains in use at remote airports in the Pacific islands, Asia, and parts of Europe. A PSP surface was constructed of interlocking steel planks, each 15 inches by 10 feet. A typical 150-foot by 5,000 foot runway required 60,000 steel planks, weighing nearly 2,000 tons, and requiring 35,000 cubic feet of cargo space to deliver. A PSP runway that size could be assembled in 175 hours by 100 unskilled men.
    The illustration is from a U.S. Army Field Manual.

    No worries,
    --David

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  17. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    Finally finished it--I think I have about 80 hours in it, maybe more. Not a beginner's project but very rewarding. I used p*****c rod for the engine mount, and copper wire, aluminum rod, and aluminum tube for the hoses, lines, and piping. The engine stand is basswood. The builder's plate came from Alin's site. The whole thing sits on a 5x7-inch base.

    I'm still in awe of anyone who could build this in 1/33 scale!

    Thank you, Alin, for a wonderful kit. :thumb: I want to tackle your Daimler-Benz 601 (in 1/16th scale) one of these days, but not too soon. And I'm still thinking about enlarging the Halinski Spitfire cockpit to sit behind the Merlin.

    And the GPM Bismarck beckons. (Now there's a nice, easy 2-year project! wall1)

    Still crazy after all these years,
    --David

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  18. Romanator

    Romanator Member

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    Wow, an excellent build, sakrison! :eek: Even in 1:16 it looks like a nightmare. The parts on the page are too small to even see, much less cut out and assemble artfully. :thumb:

    Looking forward to seeing the DB 609. It seems just a bit less complex because there isn't the complex framework surrounding it, and fewer wires and pipes as well. Still should be a challenge though. :mrgreen:
  19. Billy Leliveld

    Billy Leliveld Member

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    :-o:-o Luckely you have a museum around the corner to put it in sign1
    Amazing build David...
    Cheers,Billy
  20. sakrison

    sakrison Member

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    Here's the "heritage" shot. The Spitfire profile is by Croatian artist Vjekoslav Ranec.

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