[report] Junkers Ju 88C-6 (Military Model, 3-4/2003)

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by Swinger, Jun 17, 2004.

  1. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi, Swinger! :D

    Actually, it might be against the law to cover up that beautiful work. :lol:

    Excellent details, and some of the sharpest photos I have seen posted. :D

    As always, looking forward to more. :wink:

    Cheers!

    Jim
  2. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    0
    I actually have a hard time believing I am seeing this. You continue to be an inspiration for the rest of us, Swinger. Most grateful, booth for sharing the results of your work and how you get there. Best, Leif
  3. bfam4t6

    bfam4t6 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Messages:
    317
    Likes Received:
    0
    The amount of detail and preciseness in you work simply blows my mind. I can't wait to see some more Swinger.
  4. Swinger

    Swinger Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have finished the tail landing gear bay, as well as the landing gear itself (I'll show it when it will have been glued to the bay).

    I decided to add some elements to the bay (maybe a few would look into it, but if so, it would look strange if the bay didn't had any additions - some proportion rules must be obeyed ;) ) - the ribs (card strips cut - after having been glued to - in the places where the formers would come -> these also helped placing the formers) and some wires (the ribbed ones are old guitar strings).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  5. jrts

    jrts Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Swinger

    Fantastic and amazing stuff, a lot more photos when you can.

    Every bit is WORTH seeing :shock:

    Always more :roll:

    Rob
  6. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh boy, this is so very good. What a feast for the eye you are grazing us all with, Swinger! - Leif
  7. DN

    DN Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2004
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unbelievable :shock:
  8. barry

    barry Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    It's quite difficult to write when your chins on the floor just out of this world.

    barry
  9. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Very impressive, Swinger...with all those slats you added to the interior and to have the formers fit right on...just incredible work! :shock:

    You show us there is no limit to the detail that can be incorporated into these paper models, and then show us the way! I am very greatful for your posts as well as your inspiring work. Excellent photos too! :D

    Thanks...and more when you are able. :wink:

    Cheers!

    Jim
  10. Swinger

    Swinger Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks!

    Jim, you are right - although I've added quite many new parts, still a lot more could be added there.

    The gear bay has been assembled. Now I'll go into the bigger parts... I'm fed up with the internal details! :)

    [​IMG]
  11. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    And it looks spectacular when enclosed in the fuselage! :D

    One of the great things about your posts and construction sequence is how you show the superb details are made up as sub assemblies, and then incorporated into the overall build...truly a great and educational thread.

    I understand your wanting to get on with the bigger parts, but, boy oh boy, did I enjoy those posts on adding the details to this beauty! :lol:

    Looking forward to the next one!

    Cheers!

    Jim
  12. Swinger

    Swinger Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    The antenna wire is made of the thinnest fishing line (0.04 mm) and is glued to a spring made of a guitar string (in order to stretch the antenna and make it harder to get it torn):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Even the smallest slits look better when filled with acrylic putty. If the slit is wider, it is good to paint it with the proper colour (przed=before, po=after):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now, the last segment. The former is too small, so I encircled (?) it with a card strip. It fitted perfectly:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And here are the fuel drop pipes. Unfortunately I've made a mistake and glued them in upside down. :( Now it is too late to change it. Sh** happens. ;-) The net comes from a haberdasher's shop.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is the main antenna stretcher. The system is taken from yachting (the mainsail is operated with a system of blocks... I don't know the English names... Anyway, this thing works the same way) and allows the fishing line to be pulled out on a larger length. It is necessary to let the canopy be removable.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And here comes the vertical stabilizer.

    [​IMG]
    This is the lower rounded corner before glueing. The edges are sharpened with glass-paper (?) or cut angled (when there was no room for the glass-paper).

    [​IMG]
    The trim tab has been cut out. This is my invention, the designer didn't provided for it.

    [​IMG]
    The whole edge was treated with glass-paper. I'm really pleased with this method (a new one for me).

    [​IMG]
    The whole rudder. The round-off (?) was rounded with a rounded :) brush tip on a rubber gum. A fantastic technique, also new for me.

    [​IMG]
    And here is the whole stabilizer with the rudder mounted (without glue). A warning for Ju 88 builders - the two parts which are to hold the rudder should be glued to the stabilizer after you've got the rudder finished (the white places in the stabilizer differ from the places of two slits for these parts in the rudder).
  13. barry

    barry Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2004
    Messages:
    2,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Swinger

    This a really wonderful manual on how to build aircraft. I look forward too each chapter.

    barry

    ps I think the small rudder is usually refered to as a trim tab.
  14. Jimi

    Jimi Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    0
    yup. they are trim tabs. they are used to make the aircraft fly straight and level after they are adjusted. there's one for the aileron and the elevator too.. :)
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Swinger,

    Unimaginable results!

    Two questions: What is glass-paper and what is arounded brush tip on a rubber gum?

    Best regards, Gil
  16. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,327
    Likes Received:
    0
    Swinger, that last photo says it all about the beautiful work you are doing on this build. :D

    What an ingenious set up for the antennae wire!

    Gil, Swinger may have a different product in mind, but I have seen fine sand paper (the one that is on plastic sheet with very fine grit, not really "sand" paper; sort of like the stuff Testors used to sell for plastic modeling and I imagine others do today) referred to as "glass paper." "Rubber gum" has me, unless it's a soft pad, sort of like a mouse pad. :lol:

    Looking forward to more photos! :wink:

    Cheers!

    Jim
  17. silverw

    silverw Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    392
    Likes Received:
    0
    Unbelievable stuff you're doing here, Swinger.

    I'm guessing the "rounded rubber gum" might be a rounded erraser, like on the end of a pencil?

    Great work! :shock:

    Bill
  18. Swinger

    Swinger Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well... Yeah, I always get lost in technical English. ;) Thanks Barry & Jimi. As for the other terms...

    1. The glass-paper... Hmm, my dictionary says so, though I was a bit suspicious anyway... Probably it should be called sandpaper (huh, yeah, the other dictionary calls it sandpaper)... It's the dark gray structure ;-) on the photo. It is not any special paper for modellers, just a simple one you can get in any tool shop.

    2. Rubber gum - in other words (I think it's American English ;) ): an eraser. The light gray structure on the picture. ;-) It should be flat, not rounded. :p A mouse pad can be used, too, but rather to round bigger parts (it's usually softer).

    3. A rounded tip... I meant "the other" end of a brush. :) It can be anything rounded - a pen, a... anything. :)

    So, you must take the gum or mousepad, put a part-to-be-rounded on it, and push the part with a rounded thing. It allows to form (fold) the card in more than one direction (slightly, of course).
  19. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Swinger,

    Thanks for the clarification. The sandpaper is usually called "wet or dry" here in the States as it can be used to sand with water to aid the cutting action of the grit. It's alternate name is carborundum paper I believe.

    The "gum" or eraser pad is really and important item for a cardmodeler. The English term is a "backing pad" and it is used to back paper that is being "burnished" with a "burnishing tool" (back of your brush).

    One further question, did you color the acrylic fill? Your work on the fin is so good it's hard to tell it's a model!

    Stunned, Gil
  20. Swinger

    Swinger Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2004
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the explanation, Gil.

    The acrylic fill was coloured in the places where it was necessary - because in the thinnest slits the white colour wasn't visible (I think the putty "took" some colour from the watercoloured edges). As far as I remember, on the upper photo (from the two with "po" and "przed" :)) it wasn't coloured, and on the lower - it was.

    And one more thing - the edges were impregnated with a bit of PVA glue before sanding.