Ready Mix Sand

Discussion in 'Trackside Photos & Details' started by inflammable, Jul 19, 2009.

  1. inflammable

    inflammable New Member

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    Concrete requires several things, cement, aggregate, sand, and water, in various amounts in order to be strong. I've seen articles in the magazines about cement production and shipping, also a few articles about how to model a quarry or gravel pit. What about sand? I must have missed those.

    I don't know where the sand loads come from, or how they are loaded at that location, but I was lucky to find a Lafarge sand facility In Atlanta, GA. I was doubly lucky that this facility had a road overpass directly next to it.

    So let's follow the path of the sand when it arrives in it's car. We'll start with the cars themselves.


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    I noticed two main types of cars. Most of them were this Ortner style of rapid discharge. There were different models of this car, different heights and lengths, but they all had the same type of end platforms with three dumping bays. Blue Circle Williams was bought by Lafarge or one of it's predecessors some time ago. I think Walthers has some three bay Ortner hoppers like this, I don't know if you can find decals, though you could probably make some on your computer if you had the patience and programs.

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    The other type of hopper I saw out here was this two bay style, similar to what I've seen with Southern Railway marks, carrying regular crushed rock. Williams Brothers was bought out by Blue Circle in the more distant past.

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    And just for good measure, you could detail the inside of an empty hopper.

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    You won't really need a railyard this extravagent. The empty siding, and the siding of empties on the left are the 'actual' industry tracks. The center track with the loads on it is the former Atlanta and West Point mainline, which previously connected to the Georgia Railroad Hulsey Yard, and now terminates at the end of the cars. The fourth siding from the left, with a few more empty cars on it, might have been a siding or station lead (the former A&WP depot is up that street a ways, while the far right siding is just for a warehouse.

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    You'll also need a dumping pit. This is on the industry lead, the cars next to it are on the 'mainline'.

    I never saw a track mobile or other switching device at this location, though I'm sure there's something. I don't believe this is a busy enough location to pay a CSX switching crew to empty their cars.

    More to come later, I need to go to work (volunteer at a railroad museum).

    James

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  2. inflammable

    inflammable New Member

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    The sand falls into the pit, and onto a conveyor.

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    That's the supply conveyor in the foreground. You could probably find a scale model of a loader, or even a Matchbox style loader would work, since they come in so many different sizes.

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    The supply conveyor transfers to the piling conveyor, which appears to have the ability to rotate to several different pile locations. Also notice the railroad wheelsets, and the maintenance vehicles, since they own their fleet of railcars. Also notice that many of the walls of the facility were made of large concrete blocks. They were maybe 2' tall, 4' long, and 18 or 24 inches wide. I've seen them at several Lafarge locations, though they all could have been former Williams Block locations.

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    This is the same pile from the road side. The discharge conveyor pulls from the bottom, and delivers it to the truck loader.

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    The truck loader looks simple enough. It looks like the loader is over a truck scale, which would make sense.
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    And a modular building as an office.

    This would be a good size site for a small railroad layout, but it might make an interesting module, if you're into that. There are other facilities, the actual ready mix plants that receive sand, and cement distribution facilities that receive hoppers of powdered cement. I have information of the latter, but not the former.

    James

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  3. Ronson2k3

    Ronson2k3 Member

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    Very cool pics.. I always look forward to your threads. Again though from a modeling standpoint we can get a great deal of info from Google maps/earth if we know where the location is. I did a bit of looking on Google maps myself and found one that looks much like this one

    http://maps.google.ca/maps?ie=UTF8&...=5sVk_fXkX_4gNxZx-BCrbQ&cbp=12,358.86,,0,2.62

    I don't know if it's the same. But with the address we can see ...

    Rail Layout perhaps showing tracks that are hidden from view in the photos
    Structure and Plot plan.
    We can even derive size of the structures based on the view in Google earth as there is a measuring tool in there. I've done complete structure and plot plans for grain elevators in Iowa that way. With the photos provided I get the details. That said there are locations in Google Maps not explored (no street view available) but everything else being equal that info can be imagineered from other locations as you have done.

    Cool you work at a local Rail Museum. I used to work at 3.. Not all at the same time. It's great stuff and you get access to all the history (big fringe benefit hehe)...

    Keep those photos coming they are sure to be a great help.
  4. inflammable

    inflammable New Member

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    Yes, that's the location. Berne St is the overpass near the pit.

    Bill Kennedy Way/Glenwood Connector is the old right of way, and to the north, at the intersection of Glenwood Connector and Memorial Dr is the A&WP Depot. It's supposed to be a restaurant or something now, but the outside is decorated as a depot.

    Everyone knows about C&O, B&O, SCL, L&N as CSX predecessors, but A&WP, Georgia Railroad, Western Railway of Alabama, and several others were a little smaller, but still big contributors to today's Class 1.

    I enjoyed reading about the Ohio Central several years ago in Trains Magazine, they pointed out that the owner of the OC had setup separate, smaller companies as switching/terminal railroads in some towns, and had named them accordingly, to help put a local face on each line. I thought that was a fine idea.

    James
  5. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I must compliment you, inflammable, on your well-done and informative series of industry threads. They give us not only an up-to-date look at these industries, but your excellent photographs offer modellers a lot of suggestions for replicating the various facilities. :thumb::thumb:

    Wayne
  6. inflammable

    inflammable New Member

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    Perhaps a little late, but here is a link to the site on Bing.com Bird's Eye View.
    http://www.bing.com/maps/default.as...&phx=0&phy=0&phscl=1&scene=29059513&encType=1

    Scroll around the neighborhood to the north, and see just how large the Lafarge facility is. There seems to be a new (at time of the photo) ready mix facility next to the rail yard, but even north of that is a warehouse with an old siding to it, and west of it is the older ready mix facility. The old warehouse may have received bagged cement in boxcars, back in the day.

    James