question about caboose

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by Eddy/Claude/Robert, Aug 16, 2013.

  1. Eddy/Claude/Robert

    Eddy/Claude/Robert New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good afternoon everyone.
    I'd like to ask if the caboose are still used today for real trains?
    If not, could someone tell me up to wich time they were still used?
    Thank to everyone for you future answers, I'm interested in every picture, websites about this subject.
    Hi from a french model maker.
  2. bob neill

    bob neill New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am surprised you do not have an answer by now. Beware, my opinion is very unfounded. As asked the other night at the train club, it seem that when the railroads changed to running multiple diesel engines, they had extra room in the added cabs for the crew. Then removed the walkways from the cars and lowered the break handles, they did not need the caboose, just a blinking light.
    If you consider the steam era, the cabs were a rather busy place and having breakman, switchman, and conductor standing around would have been a mess.
    Today I would some railroads, scenic or excursion, may still use a caboose, but the passenger cars would also have space for the crew.
    I am sure someone can provide a better answer.

    Bob Neill
  3. cajon

    cajon Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    Any cabooses used on US RRs these days are nothing more than "shoving platforms". They are only used for making long reverse moves w/ a conductor riding them giving track condition info to the engineer via radio. In fact some of them are nothing more than a flat car! In the US, cabooses stopped being used as such around 1986 & replaced by "FRED" (____ rear end detector) conductors. LOL
  4. cajon

    cajon Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2004
    Messages:
    66
    Likes Received:
    0
    QUOTE=bob neill;971882] .
    "...when the railroads changed to running multiple diesel engines, they had extra room in the added cabs for the crew." The extra diesels are called the "brakeman's lounge" these days. :)
    "...Then removed the walkways from the cars and lowered the"... brake wheels.... These were removed/lowered because w/ diesels having dynamic brakes, brakemen didn't need to ride the cars setting hand brakes & retainers anymore. (RRs are always looking for ways to save money.)
    Bob Neill[/QUOTE]
  5. bitlerisvj

    bitlerisvj New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2008
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yep, you still see them once in a while. I do know that the NS uses them on the coal unit trains in West Virginia and a couple of weeks ago when visiting my Mom in Dearborn Michigan, I saw an NS Geep unit pulling a steel caboose. The caboose was in good shape, but the paint and lettering were pretty faded.
    Regards, Vic Bitleris