Picture thread of your Logging, Mining, or unique industrial equipment.

Discussion in 'Logging, Mining and Industrial Railroads' started by NIevo, Mar 1, 2008.

  1. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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    Outstanding work...:thumb:
  2. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    Looking real good Bill. Hey on that middle leg of that Surrey Parker I was just looking at the one your friend Doc G sent you because I thought that was the one you were modeling. I think she'll still hold up & it looks great. As I tell some people, you can count rivets if you want to but don't count all of them.I'm going down to Harlan Ky. to visit my parents over the weekend. I am going to try to get that mill planted on some 2" foam board so I can get my pond going. I started on the frame work for the log unloader that will sit at the edge of the pond.There is a town called Wallins Creek by my parents. I was borned there but raised in Cincinnati, Ohio. There is an old doctors brick building still sitting down there of coarse abandoned now. That was the first Doctors visit I had as a baby. I am going to take some pics of that & scratch build it. I think it will be a nice little project. I am ready to glue some styrene for change & let the sawdust settle for a while. :thumb:
  3. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Jim, The abandonment of the C & S, and my kitchen remodeling has took the wind out of the sails of this project, Where did you live around Cincy? I lived in Glendale from about 1958-1971, and was a junior member of a model railroad club, that inhabited the basement of the Glendale Library.

    Bill Nelson
  4. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Trying to get fired up to continue this project.

    @ the Club, I'm getting ready to build the sub roadbed for the Sawmill tracks.

    I am assigning Tom the job of surveying for , and installing a track for another logging camp, so we can use the Surry Parker skidder/loader that I was building for the C&S @ the club.

    hopefully this will get me moving toward compleating that unit, and the one I am making for the log loading platform @ Terrapin, on Iron mountain.

    Bill Nelson
  5. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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    "Surveying" - tie string to beer bottle. Walk to end of layout. Line up bottle and string with refrigerator or other suitable large object. Announce decision on new route. :mrgreen:
  6. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    My dad used to tell a story about one of his Alaska trips. He was up in Alaska for Champion International (or one of it's predecessors- Champion Paper) He was up in a float plane with a co worker (He was Vice president in charge of natural resources), and they were looking at a large tract of land that the company had been acquired, and were trying to figure out where to put the paper mill. They had the pilot put down near a likely spot , and they liked what they saw on the ground too. Dad said the other guy was an old school Forrester , and with a big roll of fishing line that was in the float plane, and a whisky bottle they found on the bank, they did the preliminary site survey.

    Bill Nelson
  7. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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  8. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    As I approach the successful end of my foam scenery experiment in the Gizzard I am looking out for what to do next. One thing that comes to mind is building a wharf for the steamboat down in Harlow, but another is to push forward with an eye toward completing the Surry-Parker log loader project.

    Bill Nelson
  9. Chessie6459

    Chessie6459 Gauge Oldtimer

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    Nice Bill. :mrgreen:
  10. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    I have been building eight Tichy Train Groups ore cars, which I have cut off the coupler pockets, shaved down the bolsters, and left the truss rods off of. all I have to do now is add HON3 trucks and couplers, and I will have a string of narrow gauge ore cars to work between the ore mines in Gegoukayoosa , and the ore transfer in Ridgemont.


    I have painted them dark green, and will letter them for my State Line RR. this will be close to biggest string of Hon3 cars I have, I have 4 scratchbuilt ET&WNC hopper cars lettered for the Marrietta and North georgia , and have wood cut , and details to build another four without going to the sawmill or the store. I also have ten Keystone log cars, two flat cars, a box car a reffer two combines , two coaches, and a gondola or two, I'm aproching having enough Hon3 rolling stock. Certainly I'll have enough so that I will have to add the staging tracks up in Gegokayoosa, or completely plug up Ridgemont and State Line.


    Bill Nelson
  11. ytter_man

    ytter_man Member

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    Cant wait to see em :thumb:

    Your waterfalls in the other thread look great too.
  12. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    SML SurryParker Progerss  7:1809.jpg SML S-P peices .jpg Surry Parker progress

    This is unit #1 destined for Terrapin Tn. I have been doing some work on unit #2, which was for DR. Tom's C&S, and will live at the club.

    The roofing is builders in scale v-grove roofing, which has been painted with my spray paint black and red auto body primer technique.

    I got the tongs and hooks blackened.

    Bill Nelson
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014
  13. ytter_man

    ytter_man Member

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    Looks like it all turned out pretty well :thumb:
  14. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    That it did, and unit #2 isn't far behind it. Unit #1 It just needs four turnbuckles hacked out of brass , blackened, and installed, and the two roof wings built, along with the hinges for them scratched out of brass, and the roofing installed. then I just have to make two pulleys for each tower, and they will be ready to rig and install.


    Bill Nelson
  15. Hot Cinder

    Hot Cinder New Member

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    Super job on the loader. Did you make the tongs?

    Oh...... I see from post 160 you did!

    Nice job!

    HC:thumb:
  16. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    The trick to making the tongs is to drill the holes through the brass before you cut out the shapes, cause it is a lot easier to gring off brass with a dremil than it is to get those tiny drill bits to drill a hole exactly centered in such a tiny piece.


    I have the cable ( grey button thread) on the drums of unit #1, the machinery glued on to the platform, the thread routed where it needs to go (I still need to add pullies on the tower), and the roof installed.

    While I was doing that I started to build Unit #2's roof wings and hinges, so there is some serious progress on this front. I'll post photo's once I get those * * * * * * pullies on, and again, when they are both done.

    Bill Nelson
  17. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    Hey Bill just a friendly thought & suggestion. First of all modelers with high levels of craftsmanship, efforts for detail, & desire to build as though they are the real thing as you do sometimes warrant certain constructive critizism that normally would not come to other modelers. I know the SP relies mostly on bracing with cables, chains or whatever fastened to stumps, trees & stakes to prevent lateral movement because of the rail car moving beneath prevents lateral bracing on the legs. Engineeringly speaking it looks like most of the downward force would be in the middle of the bed where there are no legs. I'm no rivet counter by all means but because of the structual detail in the rest of the build it just looks very lacking in the leg area. I have enjoyed this build but am wall1 over the leg area. Just my opinion.
  18. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    means but because of the structual detail in the rest of the build it just looks very lacking in the leg area. I have enjoyed this build but am wall1 over the leg area. Just my opinion.[/quote]


    Right you are, them legs look improbably spindly. Now my railroad is a fictitious outfit. I have been immersed in logging history since I was a little kid, and much of what you see on my railroad is stuff that I have pulled out of my ***. Mind you. I do try to get the physics involved close and make it something that will work. Often I have made up a design for a machine , a building, or a railroad car, and built it, and later found a nearly exact prototypet. That is my normal modus operendi for modeling. I can pull that off cause I have been looking at historical photos so long, my brain can pull up images that look right.


    This Surry Parker project is different from most of my stuff. There is some speculation involved, since I have no plans for the skidder-loader that I am building. I have plans for the simpler loader, and I have fuzzy black and white overall photos of both the simpler loader, and the more complex loader skidder.

    These photos seem to indicate that the skidding tower is an addition to the simpler unit to which I have plans, as the frame to the two style units apears to be the same in the fuzzy black and white photos I have used as reference. These photos are in an article on Surry Parkers in the Narrow Gauge and Short line Gazzette (The best model train magazine- period) and in Logging Railroads of South Carolina. I don't own the copyright to these photos so I can't and wond post them here.


    What these photos clearly show is that the historical photos of the originals in use have four very spindly looking legs under them. Now keep in mind that these units are petty big, and the spindley legs are bigger in cross section than a cross tie. They were probably cut from clear red or white oak. with the guy wires and tie downs, they won't be exposed to latteral forces, and will be exposed to compression forces only, no tension; and oak is insanely strong under compresion.


    If this were one of my seat of the pants models, I'd put bigger or more legs on it, but this is for me, a rare forray into modeling an actual prototype. I have a scale drawing of something very similar drawn by someone who does good work. I got fuzzy black and white photos of units like the ones the drawing is made from, and like the one I'm building. The photos and the drawings agree- THEY HAVE SPINDLY LEGS! I'm trusting my source material, and building the model accordingly. I have had to extrapolate some dimensions, but the legs ain't one of them.

    Bill Nelson
  19. Sawdust

    Sawdust Member

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    Right you are, them legs look improbably spindly. Now my railroad is a fictitious outfit. I have been immersed in logging history since I was a little kid, and much of what you see on my railroad is stuff that I have pulled out of my ***. Mind you. I do try to get the physics involved close and make it something that will work. Often I have made up a design for a machine , a building, or a railroad car, and built it, and later found a nearly exact prototypet. That is my normal modus operendi for modeling. I can pull that off cause I have been looking at historical photos so long, my brain can pull up images that look right.



    This Surry Parker project is different from most of my stuff. There is some speculation involved, since I have no plans for the skidder-loader that I am building. I have plans for the simpler loader, and I have fuzzy black and white overall photos of both the simpler loader, and the more complex loader skidder.

    These photos seem to indicate that the skidding tower is an addition to the simpler unit to which I have plans, as the frame to the two style units apears to be the same in the fuzzy black and white photos I have used as reference. These photos are in an article on Surry Parkers in the Narrow Gauge and Short line Gazzette (The best model train magazine- period) and in Logging Railroads of South Carolina. I don't own the copyright to these photos so I can't and wond post them here.


    What these photos clearly show is that the historical photos of the originals in use have four very spindly looking legs under them. Now keep in mind that these units are petty big, and the spindley legs are bigger in cross section than a cross tie. They were probably cut from clear red or white oak. with the guy wires and tie downs, they won't be exposed to latteral forces, and will be exposed to compression forces only, no tension; and oak is insanely strong under compresion.


    If this were one of my seat of the pants models, I'd put bigger or more legs on it, but this is for me, a rare forray into modeling an actual prototype. I have a scale drawing of something very similar drawn by someone who does good work. I got fuzzy black and white photos of units like the ones the drawing is made from, and like the one I'm building. The photos and the drawings agree- THEY HAVE SPINDLY LEGS! I'm trusting my source material, and building the model accordingly. I have had to extrapolate some dimensions, but the legs ain't one of them.

    Bill Nelson[/QUOTE]

    Wo Bill! didn't mean to derail on your ego there. I just felt compared to the upper section of your build the lower section looks lacking. If you like what YOU called Spindly Legs then that's all that matters. Like I said it ws just my opinion that's all. Sorry
  20. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    SML winding Cable.jpg SML winding Cable.jpg No problems, it's just nobody questions the stuff I make up. Just a little frustration showing. shame I can't share prototype photo's or you'd see instantly where I'm coming from.


    Am starting to wind cable on unit #2. the cable is Button thread, which doesn't get fuzzy on you. It is a time consuming process, but must be done befor the machinery and roof go on.


    Bill Nelson
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2014