Passing Trains

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by cn nutbar, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello Everyone---Whenever Doctor Wayne and I get together for some photo-shoots,it's not unusual to end up with more than a hundred or so pictures.Usually my favourite shots are of approaching trains where I can focus on the front of the locomotive as it comes into view.After I've taken my shot,I stop taking pictures and just enjoy the rest of the train as it passes by.On the other hand,Doctor Wayne continues to keep shooting pictures as the train rolls by,turning his back to me and often snapping photos until the caboose is out of sight.Wayne refers to this technique as "going away" shots.Here's a few examples of Wayne's technique.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  2. UP SD40-2

    UP SD40-2 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,816
    Likes Received:
    0
    TRULY FANTASTIC SHOTS!:bravo:

    My favorites, 1,2,6 & 8:winki: , but like i said, they ALL look GREAT!:thumb:

    nutbar, GLAD to see my favorites you have in there, #4100 & 4193:mrgreen: .

    [​IMG] -Deano
  3. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2007
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Awesome as usual:thumb::thumb: I always know when I see a post from you or Wayne, I am in for a treat:mrgreen:
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for posting those, Mister Nutbar. The reason that I end up with a lot of "going away" shots, especially of the prototype, is 'cause I screw-up the "comin' at me" shots. :rolleyes::p I was always just as interested in the train as in the loco, too, but most photographers did tend concentrate on the head-end. It is frustrating, though, when you're looking for pictures of freight cars. ;):-D

    Wayne
  5. e-paw

    e-paw Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    209
    Likes Received:
    0
    Whose model is the CN 2-10-2/ looks nice, great shots.
  6. logicman

    logicman Greybeard

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    0
    Grrrreat photos, as always. Thanks for sharing. :thumb::thumb::thumb:

    I've asked before, but I'm asking again:

    How did you do that fantastic flowing water effect?
    Any chance of a howto thread on that?

    Please?

    Pretty please with sugar on? :mrgreen:
  7. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    All of the locos shown belong to Mister Nutbar, as does the camera used for these pictures. Ownership of the particular finger pressing the shutter, however, is subject to speculation. ;):-D

    The water effects were my first try, and to be quite honest, I didn't really have time to shoot photos while I was learning.:p:-D
    The riverbed is 3/8" sheathing plywood, as seen in the photo below:
    [​IMG]

    The plaster bridge piers are glued in place, but the bridge itself, like all bridges on my layout, is removeable as a single unit. To create the "water", the bridge was removed. I first sprayed the river bed with "wet" water (water to which a few drops of liquid dish detergent have been added) - this was to prevent the plywood from drawing water out of the plaster mix, which is the material used to make the "water". I use a product called Durabond 90, a patching plaster available from Canada Gypsum and also from U.S. Gypsum. This comes as a dry powder, in, I believe, 1, 2, and 5lb. boxes or in 33lb. bags. I use this stuff for all of my scenic landforms, so buy the bags. The "90" refers to the approximate setting time, in minutes, as the product contains a catalyst - it will set in the specified time regardless of the consistency to which it's mixed, whether stiff enough to stand on its own while still wet, or thin enough to pass through a sieve. It's also available in other setting times. I mixed mine by adding water until it attained a thick batter-like consistency, then dumped it into the river bed. I used a variety of drywall knives to spread it around, as it was too stiff to level itself. It helps to keep the knives wet, so that the mixture doesn't stick to them. Smaller ones were used to work the material around the piers and along the shoreline. When everything appeared reasonably level and even, I used the knives, not wet but merely damp, to "tease" the swirls and eddies up around the piers. A wide knife was dragged, wet, across the wider expanses in an attempt to further level the surface, holding the handle almost level with the surface, but the actual effect was merely to make it look like there was a strong current at work.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I did a couple of other water areas, too. In the third scene below, the technique used was similar, but I also dabbed at the wet surface of the levelled plaster with a damp sponge, raising little peaks of plaster
    Before:
    [​IMG]

    After:
    [​IMG]

    From above, in the area mentioned:
    [​IMG]

    A third area, meant to represent an inlet of Lake Erie, was also done, using similar techniques. The area had already been done as hardshell over screen, so in some areas here, the "water" is about 1" thick. The sponge was used to raise some waves, and a damp drywall knife was used to create a couple of low "breakers", with the knife being held with the handle close to the surface while the knife was drawn out (towards the backdrop), then the handle lifted while at the same time reversing direction.
    This is the only photo that I can find of the area before the water was installed, seen at the bottom left corner:
    [​IMG]

    And from a normal viewing angle:
    [​IMG]

    And from overhead:
    [​IMG]

    This type of plaster, after setting but before it's fully cured, is soft enough to allow you to knock off any unrealistically high spots. Once cured, though, it is extremely hard and stands up well to dusting and vacuuming. We often place the camera on blocks of wood placed atop the finished "water", and, so far, it's resisted scratching and breakage. The two rivers are only about 1/8" deep.
    After the plaster has fully cured (I left if for a few days), I used flat latex interior house paint, applied with a 2" brush, to colour the river - the brown is the same one used as my basic terrain colour, while the dark grey/green is used on backgound trees and brush. When the paint had dried, I added "white water" effects with some PollyScale white on a 1/2" brush. After all of the paint was thoroughly dry, I brushed on three coats of water-based high-gloss clear urethane, following the manufacturer's instructions regarding times between coats.

    Wayne
  8. logicman

    logicman Greybeard

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wayne: thanks for sharing that. :thumb::thumb::thumb:

    I've dabbled with plaster before, but your masterpiece looks like
    it was done with casting resin - meant as a compliment of course.

    I shall certainly come back and re-read your tutorial when I'm more awake.
    (01.30 am here - snoooozzzzzzze.)

    It'll be a while before I have the elbow room for a layout, but I'm
    itching to try your technique.

    Thanks again - lots and lots.
  9. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you, logicman. :-D I used casting resin many years ago on a photo diorama, but I found the plaster less messy and more forgiving, too. It also doesn't "creep" up the shoreline and is probably cheaper, too. If I had thought that the knife-work hadn't, by the time the plaster started to set, produced results that would work, I would've scraped it all out and made another try. I think that there was more than a little luck at play, though - we'll see, as there's still at least one more major river to be done. :rolleyes::p
    [​IMG]

    Wayne
  10. e-paw

    e-paw Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    209
    Likes Received:
    0
    I should reword thatsign1. I meant What co. put out the model or was it scratch built etc. (sorry:p).
  11. RobertInOntario

    RobertInOntario Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    Messages:
    1,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    These are great pics -- I can't believe how realistic they are! Of course, the great layouts help a lot! Rob
  12. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,845
    Likes Received:
    0
    The 4193 is an old (1963, I think) Akane USRA 2-10-2 that I reworked for Mister Nutbar. You can check it out, including quite a few construction photos, HERE , although I should warn you that there are LOTS of pictures.
    As for the other one, the 4100, I'm guessing Samhongsa, although I wouldn't put a lot of money on that.:rolleyes::p I'm sure that Mister Nutbar will either confirm or correct that tomorrow. :-D

    Wayne
  13. cn nutbar

    cn nutbar Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2005
    Messages:
    570
    Likes Received:
    0
    hello all---thanks for all your feedback and a special thanks to Doctor Wayne for all your input.The 4193 is a custom made beauty that Doc created from an Akane usra model.The 4100 is a Pacific Fast mail brass import.Here's a couple more shots---hope you enjoy

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  14. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2005
    Messages:
    1,851
    Likes Received:
    0
    CN steam does look good going away. I guess it's the all-weather cabs.
  15. seanm

    seanm Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Messages:
    378
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have to agree with the other here. The water detail (as well as everything else) is really fantastic. I was thinking for a while it was photoshopped in somehow and was going to ask. I have some water areas planned on my upcoming build and I think I will try these ideas there. Thank you SO much for sharing!!