Paper Clock Help

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by Stephenb, Nov 27, 2011.

  1. Stephenb

    Stephenb Card Meddler

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm working on a paper clock and I have a few questions. Have any of you used wood hardener on your models, and are you able to use elmers white glue afterwards successfully? Also, after laminating a gear with elmers white glue, and letting it dry between a flat piece of glass and a few books it came out slightly warped similar to, but not quite as bad as a pringles chip. Can any of you tell me a better way? Thank you in advance for any advice.
  2. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Get away from any type of glue that says Elmers on it. ZIP DRY, UHU are the two I have the vest success with. Elmers penetrates the material too much because of it's high water content. You can get ZIP DRy at Michael's Jeweler's as well as UHU's.
  3. Stephenb

    Stephenb Card Meddler

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you very much. I've tried UHU and I found it stringy but then again I used it like Elmer's. I'll give it another try. I've never heard of ZIP DRY but I'll give that a try too. Thanks again!
  4. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    The stringy part is good because that is a strong matrix forming. It make the parts almost hold themselves together and you will find you can chance your building technique as the parts, once glued, can just be put aside to dry. The other aspect is these glues will not cause colors to run and allow plastic windows to be stuck to cardboard, like windshields, etc. If you stick with the UHU and ZIP dry and adjust accordingly, you will never go back.

    The Yellow Construction Elmers adhesive is very strong but runny and hard to work with, but that stuff is brutally strong.
  5. Renaud

    Renaud Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hardener

    I'm fond of clocks too, and of flying paper planes too. This to add that covering and soaking my models with a mixture of acetone and extra hard floor varnish makes cardstock such as plastic card, that is waterproof and elastic at the same time. The idea came to me to laminate two layers, on applying this mixture only between them, and letting the whole under heavyweight, since they would come apart until it is completely dry, I 'll experience this and tell you the result.
  6. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Don't get me wrong, but I personally won't work with acetone. I think many in this community are trying to work with non toxic acid free glues. I have worked with enough nasty chemicals to last multiple lifetimes and have no desire to go through that process. To be honest, just make the stuff out of metal if you want it that hard. Just my opinion. I would suggest getting Gap Filling Cyanocrylate (Crazy Glue) if you want a very hard surface. This stuff is so nasty though, if you can smell it, you do not have enough ventilation.

    Too many of my jobs involved nasty chemicals. I don't nasty chemicals at all. We're just building paper models, and there are enough products that are non toxic and will do the job. You can order ZIP DRY online. It is a most amazing glue, acid and lignin free (lignin makes papers yellow with age). ZIP-DRY, UHU GLUE= Good stuff.
  7. Stephenb

    Stephenb Card Meddler

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Zathros, I agree with you, we're just making paper models. I do like to keep things simple although I do have a habit of making things complicated sometimes. I remember all to well while building RC airplanes how super glue vapor burns the eyes let alone messing around with the other chemicals. I took your advice on ZIP-DRY and UHU. Thank you.
  8. Stephenb

    Stephenb Card Meddler

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is my first clock but I've thought about building a clock for some time now. After some consideration I think that I will just work with ZIP-DRY and UHU although if your going to attempt this I would love to read of your results.
  9. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    I made a clock model 25 years ago. It did work It was off 45 minutes a day, but it did work. I used Crazy glue anywhere the gears made contact. I was not as precise in these things as I am now, and I have no idea what ever happened to that model, but it is possible. I have seen enough Grandfather clocks in Connecticut that have wooden gears and are very old and keep relatively good time. At least you would at know what month you were in! :)