'nother "crummy" HOn30 project...

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by shaygetz, Sep 6, 2003.

  1. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Chris333's got me sparked for another project. Just hadta build a caboose or "crummy" for my teakettle steamer. I used an N scale streamliner truck for a starting point.

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  2. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The couplers were cut off of scrap N trucks and recessed into the floor.

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  3. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The modification of the truck weakened it considerably so styrene reinforcement was added.

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  4. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The body is in place and the windows and door are in. I installed them before I cut the body panels apart, using the full sheet of material for added security and squareness. The siding is handscribed styrene signage material.

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  5. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Bustin' a pose with a penny for perspective.

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  6. interurban

    interurban Active Member

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    :D I note, it`s good enough for a President:D
    Nice work;)
  7. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Thanks, Chris. I went to the Pensacola Model RR Show today and the teakettle steamer was a big hit with the spectators, enough that I will build a short train for it and shoot for the NMRA convention in Montgomery, AL. This caboose will bring up the rear of that train. I'll probably build a loop of narrow gauge into a club module so that it can be run as well.
  8. Greg Elems

    Greg Elems Member

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    Very cool caboose you’ve started there. It just reeks with personality. :D I like your idea about adding a loop to show off the narrow gauge side of our great hobby.

    Greg
  9. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Thanks Greg. I found that the NMRA convention is in Birmingham, not Montgomery and it will be in May 2004 so there is time and there are several catagories I could shoot for.

    The remaining details on the body are in place. The steps are bent ladder stock with wood steps, the marker lamps are from the scrap box. Also note the formed wire grabs and roof trim from .010"x.020" styrene strip.

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  10. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    From the other side...I really need to get a handle on centering that camera:eek: :p

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  11. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    Wow, I can hear the conductor now, "this job is getting to me, feels like the walls are closing in" :D :D :D
  12. Chris333

    Chris333 Member

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    COOL BEANS!!

    When I had my "train" (engine,6 cars, and caboose) I could get it to run around 5" radius curves all day without derailing. Hard to get em to run slow, but they look great in a small space with big ups and downs in the scenery.

    Nice work:cool:

    Chris
  13. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Could you imagine riding in this thing, all 49 sq. ft. of it, at the end of a log train in the North woods back in the daze before "Sports Illustrated"?

    I'll have to have at least an 8" radius for my Goose, Chris, so this'll handle that with ease. As for the speed, that's my only real concern, these little N scale lokeys aren't known for low speed operating.

    The interior had to be painted and the widow glazing had to be installed before the the roof could be put on. The chimney and its guy wires had to be installed in the same manner---even more challenging---the chimney had to be installed at an angle to the roof stock to conform to the final curve. I guessed at it and won. Note also the new brake wheel, a brass casting from a box lot.

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  14. jon-monon

    jon-monon Active Member

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    Your doing some really neat work with this stuff. Betcha can't wait to see it all bringin home a load of logs! :D :D :D
  15. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Weeelllll.......actually, it'll be bring up the rear on a tourist train:D :p ;) :rolleyes: as yet another loggin' fan faints dead away at the thought.

    Saturday finds Crankpin, Billy Joe Ray Bob and Hyram spying the FHP and wondering just how good a deal they got on their new rides. The 'boose is painted and the open air tour car is started.

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  16. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The basic car is completely scratchbuilt from my faithful store signage. The only commercial parts are the N scale "old timer" passenger trucks and the Pulman seat castings.

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  17. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    Another view. Weight is a problem, it is way too light, even with all those castings it weighs .9 oz! I'll soon post some pics on how I dealt with it.

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  18. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The weight problem was solved by using ceiling fan counterwieghts. They're flat and flexible and I was able to roll these up to look at least railroady alongside of the other cast metal brake parts used to add weight. The red washers on the bolsters are Kadee .015" to raise it up enogh to clear the truck mounted couplers.

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  19. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    With the weight now up to a healthier 1.5 oz. the seats and floor had to be painted before the side were added.

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  20. shaygetz

    shaygetz Active Member

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    The uprights are trimmed to make the overall height in the interior a comfortable 7'. Because this is modeled to reflect the 1970s, the isles and steps are prototypically narrower to pre-ADA standards i.e. no wheelchair access. It's amazing how quickly we get used to how gubmint regs affect our daily lives. If built today, the car would have to be at least 2 feet wider and one row of seats would have to be removed and wheelchair clamps installed. Not a complaint, just one of the many theorums and variables one has to take into consideration that makes realistic free-lancing so much fun.

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