New of Orlik publishing company - G-40 GLOSTER / 1:33

Discussion in 'Kit Announcements' started by Scorpio, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. Scorpio

    Scorpio Member

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    Hello friends,
    The newest model of Orlik publishing company: Gloster G.40 Pioneer.
    Model treatment of Lukasz Fuczek, in trade already from 5th August.
    http://orlik.konradus.com/

    With the best ones greet to everything

    Christoph
  2. Scorpio

    Scorpio Member

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    Hello friends,
    The newest model of Orlik publishing company: Gloster G.40 Pioneer.
    Model treatment of Lukasz Fuczek, in trade already from 5th August.
    http://orlik.konradus.com/

    With the best ones greet to everything

    Christoph
  3. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    This is a very strange coincidence. Previously this evening, I was reading lengthily about the Gloster E28/39 Pioneer (it's got to be the same aircraft, can't explain the different designation other than that the "E" was for "Experimental", which might have changed eventually).

    The reason for my reading was a link that I ended up at following a link originally supplied by Maurice in the thread on the Derwent engine. You can read up on the Pioneer as well, here:

    http://www.meteorflight.com/

    Choose "Type development" and then "E28/39 (Pioneer)".

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "W4041 taking off at Farnborough after the stabilizing fins were added (MOD)". And: "The first official flight took place on the evening of the 15th May 1941. […] The pilot P.E.G Sayer took off after a ground run of about 600 yards after running the engine up to its maxium of 16,500 rpm. After he landed 17 minutes later he reported that he had found the aircraft to be incredibly quiet, vibration free and easy to control."

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "How the hell does that thing work?" "Oh it's easy old boy it just sucks itself along like a Hoover".

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "... They also decided to mount the engine in the middle of the aircraft behind the pilot with the jet pipe protruding from the back of the fuselage and fed from a bifurcated duct in the node of the aircraft. This proved more than satisfactory despite some loss of efficiency and was later used in a number of other designs such as the F86 Sabre and English Electric Lightning."

    It is really interesting reading, and I was just wondering whether there was a paper model of this classic aircraft. Now there is!

    Leif

    PS. The Orlik/Konradus site (link above in Scorpio's posting) has an option to download their cover art in 1024x768 wallpaper format. Go to "Download" and "Tapety". Very nice feature. Here's the "Pioneer" wallpaper link as a taster: http://orlik.konradus.com/tapety/pionier.jpg

    AND - they publish instructions (brief, but still) on their website. Speaking of which - their new SE-5A is said to be fantastic, with an option to build it only partly covered, leaving the fully detailed interior structure visible for inspection!
  4. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    This is a very strange coincidence. Previously this evening, I was reading lengthily about the Gloster E28/39 Pioneer (it's got to be the same aircraft, can't explain the different designation other than that the "E" was for "Experimental", which might have changed eventually).

    The reason for my reading was a link that I ended up at following a link originally supplied by Maurice in the thread on the Derwent engine. You can read up on the Pioneer as well, here:

    http://www.meteorflight.com/

    Choose "Type development" and then "E28/39 (Pioneer)".

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "W4041 taking off at Farnborough after the stabilizing fins were added (MOD)". And: "The first official flight took place on the evening of the 15th May 1941. […] The pilot P.E.G Sayer took off after a ground run of about 600 yards after running the engine up to its maxium of 16,500 rpm. After he landed 17 minutes later he reported that he had found the aircraft to be incredibly quiet, vibration free and easy to control."

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "How the hell does that thing work?" "Oh it's easy old boy it just sucks itself along like a Hoover".

    [​IMG]

    Caption: "... They also decided to mount the engine in the middle of the aircraft behind the pilot with the jet pipe protruding from the back of the fuselage and fed from a bifurcated duct in the node of the aircraft. This proved more than satisfactory despite some loss of efficiency and was later used in a number of other designs such as the F86 Sabre and English Electric Lightning."

    It is really interesting reading, and I was just wondering whether there was a paper model of this classic aircraft. Now there is!

    Leif

    PS. The Orlik/Konradus site (link above in Scorpio's posting) has an option to download their cover art in 1024x768 wallpaper format. Go to "Download" and "Tapety". Very nice feature. Here's the "Pioneer" wallpaper link as a taster: http://orlik.konradus.com/tapety/pionier.jpg

    AND - they publish instructions (brief, but still) on their website. Speaking of which - their new SE-5A is said to be fantastic, with an option to build it only partly covered, leaving the fully detailed interior structure visible for inspection!
  5. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    The E28/39 refers to the official UK government specification. Most RAF
    aircraft in the 1930s started out from a specification issued to manufacturers
    by the UK government - the Gloster jet was no exception. The second no.
    is the year of issue, I think the first no. is the specification no. for that year.
    The prefix letter is the type (F- fighter, E-experimental) - for example the Gloster Meteor started out as F9/40.

    Most British aircraft didn't acquire official names until they were accepted for production and were known officially by their specification only during the prototype stage of development.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  6. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    The E28/39 refers to the official UK government specification. Most RAF
    aircraft in the 1930s started out from a specification issued to manufacturers
    by the UK government - the Gloster jet was no exception. The second no.
    is the year of issue, I think the first no. is the specification no. for that year.
    The prefix letter is the type (F- fighter, E-experimental) - for example the Gloster Meteor started out as F9/40.

    Most British aircraft didn't acquire official names until they were accepted for production and were known officially by their specification only during the prototype stage of development.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  7. shrike

    shrike Guest

    And it should be noted that all aircraft put forward for a given specification used the same number, so you'll find that, say, Westland, Gloster and Blackburn each had an F7/30.
    It can complicate research, not so much by confusing sources, but by getting distracted by the projects that didn't win approval. (Anyone have drawings of Westlands F7/30?)
  8. shrike

    shrike Guest

    And it should be noted that all aircraft put forward for a given specification used the same number, so you'll find that, say, Westland, Gloster and Blackburn each had an F7/30.
    It can complicate research, not so much by confusing sources, but by getting distracted by the projects that didn't win approval. (Anyone have drawings of Westlands F7/30?)