New Fokker E-III (okay, several)

Discussion in 'Internet Finds' started by Texman, Feb 23, 2006.

  1. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Machine-turned Pattern on E.III Cowling - Why?

    Eric,

    This is so far the only thing in print to in some way support my statement:

    [​IMG]

    it´s from an article in the April 2006 issue of the British magazine "RC Model World" on an amazing 1/4th (Proctor) scale build of the 'stealth cellon' E.I (here in the form of an E.III), developed by Anthony Fokker but never put into production.
    Proctor-enterprises is an interesting site, by the way: http://www.proctor-enterprises.com/

    But I know I read about it somewhere - perhaps it was in Weyl´s book "Fokker: The Creative Years". I´ll dive into it and some other sources and see what I can come up with. Might take a while, though . . .

    Meanwhile, here´s the dashing young Fokker CO Tony at Schwerin in front of the beautifullly machine-turned cowling of his 1915 top-selling product (from A. R. Weyl´s book):

    [​IMG]

    Bengt :smile:
  2. EricGoedkoop

    EricGoedkoop Member

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    Careful with that one.
  3. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    If you look closely at the shadow of the upper propeller blade on the cowling you'll see that the shadow/reflection is grossly distorted perhaps indicating a fairly uneven surface. To my eye the cowling looks as if it has been beaten out by hand using a hammer and dolly. It also looks as if no particular effort was made to achieve a smooth finish - I guess this would have taken too long to achieve.

    From my (limited) understanding of early aircraft the purpose of the cowling seems to have been to stop the pilot being showered in oil from the rotary engine rather than serving any aerodynamic purpose. So surface smoothness wouldn't have been the major objective.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  4. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Sources

    Eric,

    Do I detect a hesitant standpoint as to whether A. R. Weyl is a reliable source?

    I´m lost for words - I thought Paul Leaman was the one to look out for.
    But then again, these historians seem to be at each other´s throats every now and then . . .

    Bengt :cry:
  5. shrike

    shrike Guest

    I only base my input on having done it myself.
    The 'squiggly' pattern shown in the pictures above is even easier and quicker to achieve than the neat overlapping circles you find on say the Spirit of St. Louis, and that is pretty easy after a little bit of practice too.
  6. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Fokker E.III Machine-turned Cowling Pattern

    Yes, shrike,

    I imagine this must be a lot easier than the Ryan NYP "Spirit of St. Louis" cowl (although I haven´t tried it yet) because the pattern is supposed to be really uneven.
    The difficult bit must be to make it uneven enough, and not repeat yourself . . .
    I´ve gotta try 'swirling' that E.III pattern soon and see if I can make it look like the original:

    [​IMG]


    Best,
    Bengt :roll:
  7. EricGoedkoop

    EricGoedkoop Member

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    A fair portion of Weyl's work has been discredited, including - famously - the idea that Reinhold Platz designed the Dr.I and other aircraft.

    More often than not, it seems. Perhaps they should all relax a bit, maybe build a model . . . .

    :wink:
  8. Richard

    Richard Member

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    Fokker E.III next part

    again a couple pictures, things are really getting shape now.

    In the first pic you see the new triangular supports I made for the tailskid.
    I cheated a bit on the wheels, they came from my unfinished Morane monoplanes, only had to replace the hubs.

    I discarded the paper roll that had to be fitted between the wing-core parts. Instead I glued 2 strips of 1x1mm cardboard along the lines on the lower part and then glued the top part on.
    Beware not to use too thick cardboard for these parts otherwise you end up with a wing that's too thick.(used 0.5mm cardboard)

    Richard

    Attached Files:

  9. Richard

    Richard Member

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    parking problems

    another way to park your Fokker Eindecker........................

    Attached Files:

  10. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Fokker E.IIIs Nearing Completion

    Richard,

    There is no doubt anymore who will be the first to complete a large-scale Modele-Kartonowe Fokker E.III in one of the new colour schemes . . .
    This looks very promising indeed.
    What are the Morane wheels made of - plastic or card?

    Best,
    Bengt:grin:
  11. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Roof 'Parking'

    Well, Richard,

    Let´s hope that the pilot could WALK away from the hanger that day . . .

    Bengt :p
  12. Richard

    Richard Member

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    Bengt,

    the Morane wheels were made of three layers of 1mm thick card.
    I cut out the centres of the outer discs and after glueing them together I mounted them on a mini drill to round off the corners.
    Still having doubts about repainting the tyres as the ones on German planes were 'filthy white' rather than black.

    Richard
  13. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    'Dirty' Tyres

    Richard,

    I thought about this too. Some of the rubber tyres of this period were not dark black but light brown or light gray.
    The wet and muddy airfields of course also left their mark - on period photos the outer rims of the tyres are often quite (unevenly) bright from dried-up mud.

    The most accurate would prehaps be to run them in little pools of brown mud or clay and let them dry . . .

    Bengt :lol:
  14. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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  15. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    Tires / Tyres for WW I Aeroplanes

    Gil,

    Thanks a lot for the link to this most interesting thread on the Aerodrome Forum!
    For example, Achim Sven Engels (of the Fokker-Team-Schorndorf) writes that he are trying to find the process for making hand made tires (tyres), out of light grey (or gray, for the English chaps) Indian natural rubber, for their two current Fokker D.VII projects (of which one is for sale, by the way!).
    Apparently, rubber tires made before 1918 were not black, if you read the text next to "1918" on the time line on this web page, Oldtimer-Reifen in Munich. Michelin mixed soot in the rubber compound in this year and started the production of the black tires that are the 'standard' today (click on the British flag for English):
    http://www.oldtimer-reifen.com/
    -this link was supplied by Patrick of Coker Tires, a company that makes tires to old specifications.
    The reputed WW I-expert Dan San Abbot gives typical measurements and dimensions for wheel rims of the period.
    There are also references to my countryman, the well-known aviator Mikael Carlsson, who has restored a Fokker D.VII and is currently building a Fokker Dr.I. He is also known as the sole aviator who owns one of the two existing original Thulin-Blériot XIs in Sweden. Mikael frequently flies with his original machine and the other hangs in the ceiling in the Technical History Museum in Stockholm.

    To sum up, we had better paint our Fokker E.III tires from 1915 in a grey or light grey shade, to be on the safe side.

    Best,
    Bengt :smile:
  16. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Aerodrome is a Great Resource for WWI Modelers

    Bengt,

    You are most welcome. Aerodrome is a wonderful site to do research on. I also spend a lot of time viewing the WWI aviation artwork by some of the World's most renowned aviation artists. I have met some of the very best sources for information on that site. It comes with the very best of recommendations on my part.

    Best regards, -Gil
  17. Bengt F

    Bengt F Active Member

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    The Aerodrome Forum

    Gil,

    I agree - The Aerodrome Forum is a veritable wishing-well of WW I information.
    I too have admired the art work of Tim West and other fine artists - there are a lot of detailed drawings and paintings, showing for example the interior of The Fokker D.VII and Dr. I airplanes and other details such as rotary engines.
    It was here I first found the remarkable card model scratchbuilding thread by Eric Goedkoop.

    Register to be a member of this Forum too,
    Bengt:roll:
  18. EricGoedkoop

    EricGoedkoop Member

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    Yeah, but the Moderators over there are real jerks.


    :wink:
  19. Richard

    Richard Member

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    Teaser 1

    ....................

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  20. Richard

    Richard Member

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    Teaser 2

    ......................

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