Need GOOD plan re-size advice PLEASE

Discussion in 'Gallery & Designs' started by Fisher, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. Fisher

    Fisher New Member

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    Greeting all,
    Just want a good and simple re-size idea or solution etc etc, for a plan, in my case a plane of HMS Abercrombie 1943/1954, monitor class Roberts class.......

    Am using PSP7.0 as a 2D graphics set and modeling as is in Lightwave 8.0 and converting with Accutrans 3D to DXF and to Paperkura, giving a totaly fantastic model curvers etc etc every time, but still need to re-scale the plan of said ship.........need it a little larger for own reasons ha ha ha ha.........easier to make at my age he he he...

    Many thanks and regards to all............



    Tom......... :D
  2. Fisher

    Fisher New Member

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    Greeting all,
    Just want a good and simple re-size idea or solution etc etc, for a plan, in my case a plane of HMS Abercrombie 1943/1954, monitor class Roberts class.......

    Am using PSP7.0 as a 2D graphics set and modeling as is in Lightwave 8.0 and converting with Accutrans 3D to DXF and to Paperkura, giving a totaly fantastic model curvers etc etc every time, but still need to re-scale the plan of said ship.........need it a little larger for own reasons ha ha ha ha.........easier to make at my age he he he...

    Many thanks and regards to all............



    Tom......... :D
  3. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Maybe these will help. You can use them to figure out how much to resize the plans to get the size you want.

    Scale Calculator Page. You can use this one either online or save the page and use it offline.

    Scale Calculator Utility. This one is a program download.
  4. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Maybe these will help. You can use them to figure out how much to resize the plans to get the size you want.

    Scale Calculator Page. You can use this one either online or save the page and use it offline.

    Scale Calculator Utility. This one is a program download.
  5. Fisher

    Fisher New Member

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    SCEtoAux,

    Hi mate, thanks for the quick answer many regards, YES!!, have the scale program, just want to get some advice as to how to print off in scale so as to take measurement correctly; PSP7 seems a little reluctant to give up in this respect ......lol lol,.,.,.

    Tom...........
  6. Fisher

    Fisher New Member

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    SCEtoAux,

    Hi mate, thanks for the quick answer many regards, YES!!, have the scale program, just want to get some advice as to how to print off in scale so as to take measurement correctly; PSP7 seems a little reluctant to give up in this respect ......lol lol,.,.,.

    Tom...........
  7. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Tom,

    Is the problem getting measurements off a screen? Set rulers in programme to prefered units (cm or inches), zoom in on drawing (to get more precise readings on the rulers), note bow and stern (or other reference points) measurements, and subtract.

    To find out the present scale of your drawing, divide the full-scale dimension (hopefully supplied in your research material or drawing) by your measured dimension (use the same units, e.g. cm or inches). If the result is 400, the scale is 1:400.

    To arrive at a percentage for your desired scale, divide the present scale (e.g. 400) by your desired scale (e.g. 250). A pocket calculator yields 1,6. Which means that you should magnify your present drawing by 160 percent (just multiply by 100 if you want the result in percent).

    I presume your problem is beyond this, but if so please explain more clearly. Sorry for being so obtuse.

    Leif
  8. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Tom,

    Is the problem getting measurements off a screen? Set rulers in programme to prefered units (cm or inches), zoom in on drawing (to get more precise readings on the rulers), note bow and stern (or other reference points) measurements, and subtract.

    To find out the present scale of your drawing, divide the full-scale dimension (hopefully supplied in your research material or drawing) by your measured dimension (use the same units, e.g. cm or inches). If the result is 400, the scale is 1:400.

    To arrive at a percentage for your desired scale, divide the present scale (e.g. 400) by your desired scale (e.g. 250). A pocket calculator yields 1,6. Which means that you should magnify your present drawing by 160 percent (just multiply by 100 if you want the result in percent).

    I presume your problem is beyond this, but if so please explain more clearly. Sorry for being so obtuse.

    Leif
  9. jleslie48

    jleslie48 Member

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    well I just wrote an article on making 3d tires and resizing the american school bus from http://papertoys.com , here's the text, I think it applies to what your asking, mutatis mutandis...

    In the case of the school bus the answer is easier than the pdf model case. I bring the model into Paint Shop Pro (psp) use the
    select tool to grab a tire, cut and paste the tire, and then mirror it. These are all basic commands in PSP. I just put the
    back side tire on an unprinted spot on on the orginal sheet.

    The paint tool in PSP then lets me fill in the hubcap with black.

    With the mystery machine:
    http://www.lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/movies0310.jpg

    I took it one step further and cut out the entire wheel and spaced it out from the van body as well. I also cut out the hubcap on the outside wheel, and double printed the hubcap with a bit of the wheel, and set it inside the wheel for an even more realistic look.


    when you are starting with a PDF file, you must first convert it to JPG, GIF, or BMP before you can use PSP. I use ghostview/ghostgum/ghostscript for that. Does anybody know where the article on ghostview is?

    Using the box selection tool you can also measure the wheelbase of the school bus for scaling puroses. In the lower left corner of PSP is shows the size in dpi of the box out area before you release the button. So what I do is resize the model to 100 dpi so the math is easy. then I measure the the distance of the wheelbase by making a selection of a rectangle between the same points of the wheels. If the measurement is (whatever)x275 I know that the bus' wheel base will print at 2.75" aka 1/100 scale. if I resize the picture now to 200%, that same selection will show (whatever)x550, aka 5.5" wheelbase, aka 1/50 scale:

    bus 1:1 wheelbase: 275"

    1) 275" * X == 5"

    2) divide both sides by 275"
    X == 5.5"/275" == 1/50

    so if your model is starting at 1/100, and you want 1/72

    B1) 1/100 * X == 1/72

    B2) X = (1/72) / (1/100) = 1.39 or 139%

    B3) so increase the size of the image by 139%.

    then you will have to cut up the sheet to fit it back onto your stock paper. I generally take the original model sheet, white out the sheet, and cut from the sheet created in B3) and paste
    sections onto the new "white sheet" template. heres' a view of
    how the 1/48 school bus came out using that procedure:

    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image1.jpg

    If you need further clarifications let me know.

    here are some screen shots:




    [​IMG]
    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image2.jpg


    [​IMG]
    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image2a.jpg


    you'll note in these examples the value "840" is used where I discussed 275. Thats because this image is at 300 dpi, so whereever I calcuated at 100dpi, I had to substitute 300 dpi, hence the use of the calculator ;)
  10. jleslie48

    jleslie48 Member

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    well I just wrote an article on making 3d tires and resizing the american school bus from http://papertoys.com , here's the text, I think it applies to what your asking, mutatis mutandis...

    In the case of the school bus the answer is easier than the pdf model case. I bring the model into Paint Shop Pro (psp) use the
    select tool to grab a tire, cut and paste the tire, and then mirror it. These are all basic commands in PSP. I just put the
    back side tire on an unprinted spot on on the orginal sheet.

    The paint tool in PSP then lets me fill in the hubcap with black.

    With the mystery machine:
    http://www.lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/movies0310.jpg

    I took it one step further and cut out the entire wheel and spaced it out from the van body as well. I also cut out the hubcap on the outside wheel, and double printed the hubcap with a bit of the wheel, and set it inside the wheel for an even more realistic look.


    when you are starting with a PDF file, you must first convert it to JPG, GIF, or BMP before you can use PSP. I use ghostview/ghostgum/ghostscript for that. Does anybody know where the article on ghostview is?

    Using the box selection tool you can also measure the wheelbase of the school bus for scaling puroses. In the lower left corner of PSP is shows the size in dpi of the box out area before you release the button. So what I do is resize the model to 100 dpi so the math is easy. then I measure the the distance of the wheelbase by making a selection of a rectangle between the same points of the wheels. If the measurement is (whatever)x275 I know that the bus' wheel base will print at 2.75" aka 1/100 scale. if I resize the picture now to 200%, that same selection will show (whatever)x550, aka 5.5" wheelbase, aka 1/50 scale:

    bus 1:1 wheelbase: 275"

    1) 275" * X == 5"

    2) divide both sides by 275"
    X == 5.5"/275" == 1/50

    so if your model is starting at 1/100, and you want 1/72

    B1) 1/100 * X == 1/72

    B2) X = (1/72) / (1/100) = 1.39 or 139%

    B3) so increase the size of the image by 139%.

    then you will have to cut up the sheet to fit it back onto your stock paper. I generally take the original model sheet, white out the sheet, and cut from the sheet created in B3) and paste
    sections onto the new "white sheet" template. heres' a view of
    how the 1/48 school bus came out using that procedure:

    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image1.jpg

    If you need further clarifications let me know.

    here are some screen shots:




    [​IMG]
    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image2.jpg


    [​IMG]
    http://lhvcc.com/egiftshop/others/busresize_image2a.jpg


    you'll note in these examples the value "840" is used where I discussed 275. Thats because this image is at 300 dpi, so whereever I calcuated at 100dpi, I had to substitute 300 dpi, hence the use of the calculator ;)
  11. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Have you tried opening a new blank image in PSP, turning on the grid lines and adjusting them to the horizontal and vertical size you feel is the best for you to work with then pasteing the part as a new layer and using the deformation tool to adjust the size?

    I have my grid set to .250" spacing vertical and horizontal. That helps. I also watch the rulers at the top and side of the page and note where a part starts and stops to get an idea of the size.

    Using layers helps in moving a part around or starting over on a part without having to redo the whole picture. You can have many layers on a pic and work with them individually. When you are done you can merge them all and save the pic in a format you want, or save the pic as a .psp image so the layers are preserved and you can go back later to change individual parts.

    Hope this helps some or gives you some ideas to work off of. :)
    ~Doug~
  12. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Have you tried opening a new blank image in PSP, turning on the grid lines and adjusting them to the horizontal and vertical size you feel is the best for you to work with then pasteing the part as a new layer and using the deformation tool to adjust the size?

    I have my grid set to .250" spacing vertical and horizontal. That helps. I also watch the rulers at the top and side of the page and note where a part starts and stops to get an idea of the size.

    Using layers helps in moving a part around or starting over on a part without having to redo the whole picture. You can have many layers on a pic and work with them individually. When you are done you can merge them all and save the pic in a format you want, or save the pic as a .psp image so the layers are preserved and you can go back later to change individual parts.

    Hope this helps some or gives you some ideas to work off of. :)
    ~Doug~