My IM 40' boxcar

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by railBuilderdhd, Aug 30, 2008.

  1. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Here is an InterMountain model I purchased on eBay for the sole purpose of learning weathering. I'm not sure it that good but I've learned on it. Please give me all your comments I need to heat them to get better. The paint job is loosely based on a proto photo but I need to look for the digital copy of the photo.

    This side I airbrushed
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    This side was all chalks to look like the other. You can see how it's not as dark
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    The ends need to have some of the spray grim reduced so they don't look so dark
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    Here is the bottom details - I still need more dirt and weathering (open for ideas)
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    Thanks for looking and any comments you may have.

    Dave
  2. Dave Harris

    Dave Harris Member

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    A GREAT modeler once gave me some GOOD advice -- " If you can't see it don't model it!"
    By that he meant that some things don't really need to be done ---- for instance the underside of you boxcar --- you can't see it on the layout why spend a lot of time detailing it?
    Other than that, I'd say you boxcar looks pretty good, seems the chalk worked out best & was probably the easiest to boot.
  3. railroader9731

    railroader9731 Member

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    I dont know if you used a alchol wash but if not try it. It will take the shine of the car and you can also add streaks with it. Looks good other wise:thumb:
  4. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    I like the airbrushed side better. The chalk is a bit too concentrated on the rivet lines.
  5. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Looks good overall...I would add some rust streaks running down from the roof at other places besides the rivet lines. The bottom of the sides could use a bit of "road grime"...I like the couplers...They look great..!!
    Why are the wheels a silvery color..? Did you paint the treads on the wheels..? If so, don't...the paint will wear off all over your track...Not good....
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Unlike Triplex, I prefer the side done with chalk, although it's too heavily weathered for my tastes. ;) One thing to keep in mind is that if the rust forms along the rivet/seam lines, it generally does so equally along the length of the seam. However, rain washes some of this down the side of the car, so the concentration of accumulated rust is greatest at the bottom. Most of the time, these seam lines are merely places where dirt and grime accumulate, and while there may be rust on older cars, most of what you'll see here is dirt. Something to keep in mind when applying rust is the nature of paint adhesion: paint adheres better to a convex surface than a concave one, so the paint on a rivet head may remain in relatively good condition, while the sheets through which it passes may begin to rust around the hole. Rust forms where paint coverage fails, either due to poor adhesion or physical damage. Many steel cars (probably most nowadays) have unpainted galvanised steel roofs, which won't rust unless the galvanising fails. This coating is weakest where holes have been punched for rivets or other fasteners, and sometimes, where separate ribs are used for strength, these parts are not galvanised at all. Rust from these areas will wash down the car's side, but the appearance of it will generally be quite subtle. While "patch" paint jobs are quite common nowadays, paint "life" in the transition era (and earlier) was generally around 20 years. While there wasn't a mass re-painting of 20 year old cars, they were done as they came in for more than minor repair work. This is also a good "rule-of-thumb" to keep in mind when running cars with older paint schemes - if it's a '20s paint and lettering scheme, and you're modelling the late '50s, your car should be updated with that road's current scheme (or scrapped). ;):-D
    Whatever dirt or rust collects on a car is also subject to the weather, especially rain, which tends to wash everything towards the lower parts of the car.
    The sun is also a major factor in weathering, especially for fading the paint. Unless you're modelling a car that's fresh from the builder, cars should have either a low sheen or flat finish. A simple way to give a car a faded appearance is to mist it with a very dilute spray of the car's base colour - about 90% thinner works well. The paint doesn't have to be an exact match, either - the same colour or one slightly darker will kill the starkness of the lettering, while a shade slightly lighter will give the appearance of fading. You can tone down that wheel spray on your car's ends with a light spray of the original (or close to it) colour, but be careful not to obliterate the reporting marks near the top.
    Even a car as dirty as yours would have the dimensional data at least partially visible, and some of it could be new paint. For some further ideas on this check HERE.
    For many, one of the most difficult parts of weathering is simply attempting it for the first time. Most people start with an el cheapo car and I started on a piece of cardboard. Starting on an Intermountain car, like you did, certainly shows no trepidation on your part. ;):p:-D:-D

    Wayne
  7. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Thanks everyone for the comments on ways to improve what I've done. I've gone ahead and removed what had been done with alcohol and I will rework this one again.
    I know it looks bad enough to be my first try Wayne but it's not the first car I've painted. I'll post new photos when I'm done with the second try.
    Dave
  8. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Dave...

    Looks good. Wayne's advice is very helpful - you've seen his results...? ;)

    I have two comments...

    One - It looks like a very dirty car, but in very good shape underneath. If you want to represent a more well-used car, you'll have to venture into the application of rust, repairs, and updates as per Wayne's info.

    Two - The ladders, steps, and grabs do not look worn OR dirty... While I realize that dirt would not pile up on the ladder rungs, the step below the door (for example) would be worn, possibly rusty, possibly bent. I guess this goes with my comment #1... :)

    Good work though! Keep it up! :thumb:

    Andrew
  9. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    First I want to thank everyone for the great comments - they helped me decide to start over.
    Here is the model after I've washed off the last paint job and tried again. I did open the file in photoshop and used auto on the camera so the color is a little off. I feel it looks better but I still plan to add more layers to fix a few errors I see now. This is based loosely on the first photo in my last posting.
    Thoughts?
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  10. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    This one certainly looks more faded, or is that just the camera? I think the rust and dirt are improved.
  11. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Yes, it's got a lot more fad to it now than before because I airbrushed a color fade before I did any weathering. I think the rust looks much better now but I plan to get one more layer to add more dark areas and rust from the hatches on the roof. Then I'll do a layer of dirt to the car and I hope that'll be all I need.
    Thanks for the comments to all.
    Dave
  12. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Dave,

    You might want to rust out some of the letters. For whatever reason, the letters on a car, especially large areas like the "HORMEL" letters, tend to rust or at least weather differently.

    I think that doctor wayne's suggestions about paint patches and/or stencil updates would look great on this car.

    You've done some great stuff! :thumb: :thumb:

    Andrew
  13. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Great comments from all, thanks! I would like to know since I need to replace the wheels on this model would it matter if I use ribbed wheels or not?
  14. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    If you are trying to stay prototypical, you'll need to know that ribbed back wheels were used up to about WW2. After that, they were replaced by smooth backed wheels. There are more details available, but that's the simplest version... ;) :D

    Andrew
  15. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    I've got some work done on this car and I feel it looks much better than before. I still see were some work is needed but I would like to hear what everyone things before I do much more.

    ... and get this I didn't paint the wheels this time :oops: :cry::cry::cry:
    dave

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  16. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Here's an update and I've put this car on the finished pile as I have more piling up that I need to move on to. I've learned mush from this and that's what I want from it. I may be willing to revisit if there are some comments that will help take this model to a better complete look then it is now.

    Dave

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  17. Fluesheet

    Fluesheet Member

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    Hello railBldrHD,

    Late to the comments, but I would suggest two things around the trucks:

    - The area below the journal lid would have quite a bit of oily dirt build up. This is a friction bearing truck, which had to be kept lubricated. Over fill, or just missing with the oiler would leave an oil film on the surfaces, and as we all know, oil attracts dirt. This same oily mung ends up on wheel faces and the lower beam of the truck as well.
    - Dab some slightly thinned flat black on and especially between and on either side of the springs. This will give the look of depth between the springs and to some degree, between coils.

    Matt
  18. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    Thanks Matt, I'll do that before I box this one up.

    Dave