Models By Marek Bristol F2B Fighter

Discussion in 'First Impressions Kit Reviews' started by Ron, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    boring..............I think not!:grin:

    The insulation did great! I know it's early but what are you going to use for the flying wires?

    john
  2. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    boring..............I think not!:grin:

    The insulation did great! I know it's early but what are you going to use for the flying wires?

    john
  3. Ron

    Ron Member

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    John.....


    Now you did it! I went through rigging hell with a build I did of Marek's Pfalz.
    Back then I was looking at monofilament fishing line, various threads, guitar strings etc. I ended up using simple polyester thread and crazy glue. I have a spool of this other stuff I found at a dollar store that might work. It's 34 guage
    aluminum wire that looks like it's actually flat up close.
    I have no clue as to how to secure it yet. I'll have to experiment

    Ron
  4. Ron

    Ron Member

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    John.....


    Now you did it! I went through rigging hell with a build I did of Marek's Pfalz.
    Back then I was looking at monofilament fishing line, various threads, guitar strings etc. I ended up using simple polyester thread and crazy glue. I have a spool of this other stuff I found at a dollar store that might work. It's 34 guage
    aluminum wire that looks like it's actually flat up close.
    I have no clue as to how to secure it yet. I'll have to experiment

    Ron
  5. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Well........ that's really the only thing that stops me from the WWI birds......... I did Digital Navy's P-26 and used mono-filament first then changed to floral wire.......... really wasn't satisfied with that either.........

    Alright Gil or Eric............ how about coming up with a solution for this modeling dilemma...........

    Ron have you looked at some of Eric Goedkoop's work...........have a look see..........words don't work good enough to describe

    john
  6. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Well........ that's really the only thing that stops me from the WWI birds......... I did Digital Navy's P-26 and used mono-filament first then changed to floral wire.......... really wasn't satisfied with that either.........

    Alright Gil or Eric............ how about coming up with a solution for this modeling dilemma...........

    Ron have you looked at some of Eric Goedkoop's work...........have a look see..........words don't work good enough to describe

    john
  7. EricGoedkoop

    EricGoedkoop Member

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    Yeah, right.

    To be honest, I HATE rigging.

    I've been using monofilament (invisible thread), colored black with a marker and attached in one of the following ways:

    1) A line exiting a wing or fuselage (rudder and elevator control lines, for example) can be knotted at one end. Push the knot through a hole in the fuse, apply a drop of white glue and then pull the line back carefully until the knot is just at the backside of the card. White glue won't hold monofilament, but it will harden around it and trap the knot.

    2) At control horns, a very little bit of CA. Might not grab the first time around - when this happens cuss quietly and then try again with another very little bit. I also HATE using CA on card models, but for stuff like this there really isn't a choice.

    3) At strut bases (flying and landing wires, for example) the monofilament can be tied in a knot around the strut. A drop of white glue will hold the knot from untying. The only real hard part about this is getting the stuff tight before tying the knot . . . .

    4) Wing bracing wires on monoplanes should NOT be run as continuous lengths going through the wing - tension will pull anhedral into the wing and you'll always have a curve in the line where it passes through. Better to poke two small holes through the wing at the attachment point (chordwise) and tie a small piece of mono through them in a loose knot. The upper and lower bracing wires can then be passed through this loop on either side of the wing and the knot pulled tight and glued. Once the glue holding this knot dries, you can tug the lines tight and glue them again. I explain all this a lot better in the MoS/Pfalz thread.



    For short runs, straightened wire is way easier to deal with.

    Back before I got all particular about such things, I used ordinary sewing thread and it's a joy to work with compared to monofilament. The problem, of course, is all that fuzz. I recently found some #100 pure filament silk thread, however, and am anxious to give it a shot. It's thin enough to use for 1/48th and fuzz-free. I'm in the middle of a project that I already started to rig with mono, but will try the silk on my next one.





    The Biff is coming along nicely, Ron.
  8. EricGoedkoop

    EricGoedkoop Member

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    Yeah, right.

    To be honest, I HATE rigging.

    I've been using monofilament (invisible thread), colored black with a marker and attached in one of the following ways:

    1) A line exiting a wing or fuselage (rudder and elevator control lines, for example) can be knotted at one end. Push the knot through a hole in the fuse, apply a drop of white glue and then pull the line back carefully until the knot is just at the backside of the card. White glue won't hold monofilament, but it will harden around it and trap the knot.

    2) At control horns, a very little bit of CA. Might not grab the first time around - when this happens cuss quietly and then try again with another very little bit. I also HATE using CA on card models, but for stuff like this there really isn't a choice.

    3) At strut bases (flying and landing wires, for example) the monofilament can be tied in a knot around the strut. A drop of white glue will hold the knot from untying. The only real hard part about this is getting the stuff tight before tying the knot . . . .

    4) Wing bracing wires on monoplanes should NOT be run as continuous lengths going through the wing - tension will pull anhedral into the wing and you'll always have a curve in the line where it passes through. Better to poke two small holes through the wing at the attachment point (chordwise) and tie a small piece of mono through them in a loose knot. The upper and lower bracing wires can then be passed through this loop on either side of the wing and the knot pulled tight and glued. Once the glue holding this knot dries, you can tug the lines tight and glue them again. I explain all this a lot better in the MoS/Pfalz thread.



    For short runs, straightened wire is way easier to deal with.

    Back before I got all particular about such things, I used ordinary sewing thread and it's a joy to work with compared to monofilament. The problem, of course, is all that fuzz. I recently found some #100 pure filament silk thread, however, and am anxious to give it a shot. It's thin enough to use for 1/48th and fuzz-free. I'm in the middle of a project that I already started to rig with mono, but will try the silk on my next one.





    The Biff is coming along nicely, Ron.
  9. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hmmmm...,

    Hi All,

    I prepare 2# to 4# test monofilament nylon by passing a length through 220 grit sandpaper (400 grit will do too). Do at least a half dozen passes to get all the stuff on the surface off and to prepare it for coloring. I use a mixture of Testor's non-rubbing steel with a touch of gunmetal applied with a Q-tip. Do another application just to make sure it's all covered. One of the nice things that sanding the monofilament does is to remove manufacturing films and to give it tooth so that CA glue will secure it (Eric you'll love the way the CA wicks to the monofilament when prepared this way). I have very small diameter drill sets which are very useful for punching holes in the right places for rigging. Fooling with a pin in a pin vise works much better if the pin has had one side flattended on a fine grit stone (old style spoon drill) but the Dremel with a small diameter drill does it quckly, cleanly and nicely. Wick a small drop of CA on the prepared monofilament and stick it in the hole. It should set nearly immediately. If not, a quick mist with Zip Kicker will set it. Don't over tighten the rigging whatever you do. Slack can be taken up by judiciously applying heat from a heat gun EVER SO CAREFULLY AND QUICKLY. Nylon monofilament will shrink when heated and take up any slack. Always plan ahead for rigging. Drill the holes in advance of assembly otherwise it will be a nearly impossible task to do decently.

    100% Silk thread works well and can be found on the net at places that cater to jewely making supplies. An old model ship builders technique is to dissolve bees wax in turpentine and use this to coat the rigging. It is rubbed down to get all the fuzz to stick down. It also adds a dull sheen which makes the rigging look more realistic for some reason...,

    -Gil
  10. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hmmmm...,

    Hi All,

    I prepare 2# to 4# test monofilament nylon by passing a length through 220 grit sandpaper (400 grit will do too). Do at least a half dozen passes to get all the stuff on the surface off and to prepare it for coloring. I use a mixture of Testor's non-rubbing steel with a touch of gunmetal applied with a Q-tip. Do another application just to make sure it's all covered. One of the nice things that sanding the monofilament does is to remove manufacturing films and to give it tooth so that CA glue will secure it (Eric you'll love the way the CA wicks to the monofilament when prepared this way). I have very small diameter drill sets which are very useful for punching holes in the right places for rigging. Fooling with a pin in a pin vise works much better if the pin has had one side flattended on a fine grit stone (old style spoon drill) but the Dremel with a small diameter drill does it quckly, cleanly and nicely. Wick a small drop of CA on the prepared monofilament and stick it in the hole. It should set nearly immediately. If not, a quick mist with Zip Kicker will set it. Don't over tighten the rigging whatever you do. Slack can be taken up by judiciously applying heat from a heat gun EVER SO CAREFULLY AND QUICKLY. Nylon monofilament will shrink when heated and take up any slack. Always plan ahead for rigging. Drill the holes in advance of assembly otherwise it will be a nearly impossible task to do decently.

    100% Silk thread works well and can be found on the net at places that cater to jewely making supplies. An old model ship builders technique is to dissolve bees wax in turpentine and use this to coat the rigging. It is rubbed down to get all the fuzz to stick down. It also adds a dull sheen which makes the rigging look more realistic for some reason...,

    -Gil
  11. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I reinforce the holes in the paper with fabric tape. I'm using what is called linen hanging tape that is used for mounting artwork. It's archival and acid free. I trim the tape to shape then put in on the backside of the hole in the paper. I sew the thread though the hole then stitch and knot the thread to the fabric.

    --Lizzie
  12. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I reinforce the holes in the paper with fabric tape. I'm using what is called linen hanging tape that is used for mounting artwork. It's archival and acid free. I trim the tape to shape then put in on the backside of the hole in the paper. I sew the thread though the hole then stitch and knot the thread to the fabric.

    --Lizzie
  13. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Cockpit Coaming Experiment

    Hi Ron,

    Got back to late. You've already solved the coaming problem. You did get me thinking about an issue that's been on the back burner for some time so I decided to take action and experiment a bit to see if I could come up with a viable solution. Four or five trys later I was able to get something that is passable. It consists of embossing a crease in the paper using a plexiglass panel with a scored out channel to align and sharpen the crease. The strip of paper is then foldded over by finger then flattened out and applied to the cockpit coaming. The two sides are then systematically worked down to conform to the cockpit surround by finger and burnishing tool (PVA is used to glued the coaming down). A pounce tool was then carefully run at the edge of the coaming to give it the "laced" effect. The color is from a Sharpie brown permanent marker.

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  14. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Cockpit Coaming Experiment

    Hi Ron,

    Got back to late. You've already solved the coaming problem. You did get me thinking about an issue that's been on the back burner for some time so I decided to take action and experiment a bit to see if I could come up with a viable solution. Four or five trys later I was able to get something that is passable. It consists of embossing a crease in the paper using a plexiglass panel with a scored out channel to align and sharpen the crease. The strip of paper is then foldded over by finger then flattened out and applied to the cockpit coaming. The two sides are then systematically worked down to conform to the cockpit surround by finger and burnishing tool (PVA is used to glued the coaming down). A pounce tool was then carefully run at the edge of the coaming to give it the "laced" effect. The color is from a Sharpie brown permanent marker.

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  15. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    See............. I knew I could count on you two guys for answers!

    Both tips are great......... you guys are going to make me drag out all those WWI planes I've bought and just couldn't make myself do!:grin:

    My only question Gil.......... is how long does the mono last once the outer layer has been sanded off........... I know it won't stand up to UV from the sun, but what about from florescent lighting.......... does it effect it?
  16. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    See............. I knew I could count on you two guys for answers!

    Both tips are great......... you guys are going to make me drag out all those WWI planes I've bought and just couldn't make myself do!:grin:

    My only question Gil.......... is how long does the mono last once the outer layer has been sanded off........... I know it won't stand up to UV from the sun, but what about from florescent lighting.......... does it effect it?
  17. Ken Horne

    Ken Horne Member

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    Hey guys,

    Silk thread (I got some silver stuff at a quilting store for too much money ) is SOOOO nice. The thinest piano wire is the easiest to work with though, just measure the gap with dividers, cut the wire a little long, poke a couple of holes with a needle and poing it into place. Major problem though is that even the thinnest is large...

    Kenny
  18. Ken Horne

    Ken Horne Member

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    Hey guys,

    Silk thread (I got some silver stuff at a quilting store for too much money ) is SOOOO nice. The thinest piano wire is the easiest to work with though, just measure the gap with dividers, cut the wire a little long, poke a couple of holes with a needle and poing it into place. Major problem though is that even the thinnest is large...

    Kenny
  19. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    UV Degredation?

    Hi Greg,

    Indoor fluorescent lighting emits extremely low UV as compared to sunlight. This when combined with the paint used to color the wire minimize any degradation of the underlying nylon to a level that probably will allow it to last as long as the paper.

    -Gil

    P.S. Ron, Beautiful build and thanks for the amount of work and time taken to obtain great photogrpahs of it.
  20. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    UV Degredation?

    Hi Greg,

    Indoor fluorescent lighting emits extremely low UV as compared to sunlight. This when combined with the paint used to color the wire minimize any degradation of the underlying nylon to a level that probably will allow it to last as long as the paper.

    -Gil

    P.S. Ron, Beautiful build and thanks for the amount of work and time taken to obtain great photogrpahs of it.