Modeling in plastic?

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by RedHeadKevin, May 16, 2009.

  1. RedHeadKevin

    RedHeadKevin New Member

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    I'm new to this site, and I joined it specifically to ogle that 3-foot Battlestar Galactica model. I've never really built a cardstock model before, but I've done plastic modeling for 25 years. I was wondering if anyone's mounted these cardstock printouts to thin sheet styrene, and built the models out of plastic. Thanks for any input.
  2. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    What would be the point of doing that? The cardstock is quite sturdy as it is.
  3. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    Welcome to the fold.

    On the web I have seen a modeler who used paper model kits as a template to build large scale ship models. But I have to reiterate cdavenport’s comment what would be the point. You appear to be a scratch builder give paper modeling a try for all intent and purposes it is scratch building. I guarantee you the skills you will develop building paper models will improve your plastic builds.

    Jim Nunn
  4. SJPONeill

    SJPONeill Guest

    However, you could use the paper shapes as templates for thin plastic sheet and paint the completed model post-assembly. This would provide an opportunity to build some cool models that are not available in other media and also overcome through plastic TTPs some the fit and filling issues that sometimes occur with paper models especially for the non-maestros...
  5. cmags

    cmags Guest

    There are a few folks that have transferred some Fiddler's Green templates to styrene (I think) to build RC aircraft. Here's a link to one:

    (looks like this one uses durobatics foam which is a polystyrene foam)
    http://www.zealot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=163707
  6. RedHeadKevin

    RedHeadKevin New Member

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    Well, here's what I was thinking: Like I said, I was blown away at the prospect of making a 3-foot Galactica, but I'd like more detail, especially at that size, than the paper model provides. I'm thinking specifically of all the ribbing detail on the surface of the ship, as well as the other greeblies.
    [​IMG]

    The card model is, for all intents and purposes, smooth. At this size, I'd want to have more 3-dimensionality to the surface. It's the same with all the guns. The card model is great, but I want more 3-D detail.
  7. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    I am a former president of IPMS/USA; I still bleed plastic.

    I understand the urge and, now, the purpose of your query. Not being a purist, I integrate other mediums into my card models.

    Allow me to suggest that once a surface is primed, paint does not care what is underneath. Cardstock is even easier to work than plastic. To get some 3D into my cardmodels, I will print a section more than once then layer it. I'll paint it if necessary.

    Don't feel compelled to laminate the card to the plastic. That being said, if you still desire to do so, I would recommend a thin spray of 3M adhesive on the back of the card. It will adhere aggressively to both the card and plastic.
  8. cdavenport

    cdavenport Member

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    I am a former president of IPMS/USA; I still bleed plastic.

    I understand the urge and, now, the purpose of your query. Not being a purist, I integrate other mediums into my card models.

    Allow me to suggest that once a surface is primed, paint does not care what is underneath. Cardstock is even easier to work than plastic. To get some 3D into my cardmodels, I will print a section more than once then layer it. I'll paint it if necessary.

    Don't feel compelled to laminate the card to the plastic. That being said, if you still desire to do so, I would recommend a thin spray of 3M adhesive on the back of the card. It will adhere aggressively to both card and plastic.
  9. bonnettm

    bonnettm New Member

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    Where is a good cheap source of card stock to start out with and which printer is most popular?

    Thanks for answers
  10. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Wrong place for this, but I have had really good luck with my Epson Workforce 1100 wide format printer (around $169 ). It will do up to 13" wide and 9 feet long if you set it up right. I think the length is determined by when the ink might run out. These do not have scanners. The Epson NX420 is an excellent inexpensive printer that has a really good scanner attached to it. I have seen them for $69.95. These both use the same cartridge which comes in handy, if you read this post, it will tell you why.

    http://www.zealot.com/forum/showthread.php?t=171086

    Post number 3. You made that thread so this is probably a redundant post, which is why we try to post things in one area! :)
  11. paper hollywood

    paper hollywood Member

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    Welcome to the board, Kevin. It sounds to me like you're experiencing something many of us do when we first encounter card modeling: paper reluctance. I was the same way at first. I suggest building a couple of simpler paper models than the Galactica and getting a feel for the medium. Good quality acid-free card stock is a very good material for models if properly used. And even if you printed a paper model on plastic sheets, you couldn't build it the same way, since plastic doesn't score an bend the same way paper does. You'd probably end up cutting all the parts out and having to glue in a lot of scratch-build supports. Then you'd have to putty, sand and paint-- all things unnecessary if you build in paper. Give paper a try first.

    Wade