Metallized paper

Discussion in 'Tools of the Trade' started by Darwin, Jul 30, 2004.

  1. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Square it's nice to have company....,

    Reviewing Darwin's original post resulted in my looking more closely at food packaging. I've found that what we're probably looking for isn't paper but a layered film with one of the surfaces being composed of aluminum. I suspect that it's a composite of polyethylene (for ease of closure), mylar (for rugedness) and aluminum (as a vapor seal). I'm including a photograph showing to some effect the visual properties of this material. Now to see if it can be bonded to card stock or better yet to find some enterprising manufacturer that has this available in their product folio.

    Knowing what you're looking for does help...., A LOT!

    Best regards, Gil

    P.S. After further examination it was discovered that the material does have a paper layer after all!

    (Photo no longer available for viewing)
  2. Sticky Fingers

    Sticky Fingers Member

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    It should bond to card stock with spray adhesive. But the trick will be just how well will it print. :? :?
  3. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello All,

    Finally found the right name for the product. ALUMINUM FOIL PAPER...., the following is from a Chinese website. The quote terms are on a 20 MT basis. Thaaaaaaat's right 20 Metric Tons! Now to trace down a user that has scraps to sell off. It has what appears to be a water activated acrylic glue backing for laminating..., nice, very nice.

    Best regards, Gil

    Description Of Self Adhesive Aluminum Foil Paper
    Product Name: Self Adhesive Aluminum Foil Paper
    Model Number: YY-771
    Place of Origin: China
    Specifications:
    1)Face paper: 80g flat-silver gloss aluminum foil paper
    2)Bottom paper: 95g yellow bottom anti-stick paper
    3)Glue water: acrylate emulsion adhesive
    4)Weight: 210g/sqm
    5)Specification:
    a) Sheets: (10 x 10 – 78.7 x 109.2cm)
    b) Rolls: (6 – 109.2cm)
    6)Packaging: sheets in cartons, rolls in woven bags or cardboard
    7)Main uses: facture non-drying brands and adhesive labels
    8)Supply capacity: long-term supply without limit
    9)Delivery period: on basis of 20MT/7 days
    10)Remarks: face paper, bottom paper adhesive and packaging at client's option
  4. Square

    Square Member

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    Gil
    I will jump into my Geo Metro and be right over to pick it all up at once <G> ok so how much is a metric ton ($) (not weight)
    and how much to ship it <G>
    let me guess after you stopped coughing you didnt bother :)


    I think we are back to figuring out how and what to laminate
    anyone try using both sides of Reynolds wrap?
    Square
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello All,

    Square, don't laugh but the following photograph shows some experiments regarding regular old Reynolds Wrap (common name for Aluminum foil) in an effort to make Aluminum Foil Paper.

    I First had to find a glue that would bond the foil to the paper backing. After going through what I thought should work (and didn't) I found that Alene's tacky glue worked extremely well. I experimented with first bonding a light layer of 24# bond paper to the foil to minimize glue use and drying time (see #3.) below). After drying the paper can be bonded to the desired weight card stock. The foil was worked on a pane of glass with a cotton napkin and finger tip action to smooth out any wrinkles in preparation for bonding to the paper (sample is shown in #1.) below). The foil is dead soft and can be worked quite a bit before it work hardens and needs to be reheated to anneal it. The Alene's tacky glue was thinned with a small amount of water and was painted on the paper. The excess was then squeegeed off before applying the foil bright side down. The reason for bonding the bright side was due to a pattern on the bright side surface and besides the dull side looks better for modeling purposes. The lay-up was then placed between two panes of glass and allowed to dry.

    The other experiment concerns the tea wrapper pictured earlier in this thread. It was bonded to a piece of 67# card stock and allowed to dry (see #2.) below).

    I was pleasantly suprised that the hand made foil paper looked nearly identical if not better than the commercial. I made some small test pieces and subjected them to embossing tests shown below in 4.) and 5.) below. Longeron lines, rivet detail, corrugation detail and embossed panel lines were tried. I have to admit this was actually a lot of fun as the amount of sharp, crisp detail allowed by the foil is many times that of normal card stock.

    Enough for now...,

    Best regards, Gil
  6. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi all

    I have been watching this with intrest and thought I would show the foil tape I use to produce a metalic finish!!

    This is T 303 BOC Foil Tape used for the joints on pipe insulation world wide, it will stick to anything so longs as its not wet.
    It comes in loads of sizes.

    The roll shown is a bit battered as it has been rolling around my car for a while :roll: This is a two inch (50mm) wide roll 45mt long and costs about $12 a roll.

    I have used this in rolls upto 100mm (four inch) but by order you can get bigger sizes. when used right you can laminate an A4 sheet with no joints showing.

    Hope this helps

    Regards

    Rob
  7. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Rob,

    Great input! The foil tape is great for doing landing gear and polished shafts. Cut a thin strip and it adds the extra detail to aircraft oleos. Cut in thin strips it can also be used as canopy structure over clear plastic sheet. It forms well and will follow compound curves.

    I've tried your method of covering a card sheet with it with varying results. It's still difficult to impossible to print on. The glue stick coating in alcohol may overcome this. This brings up an intersting observation of the glue stick. I've found that the denatured alcohol removes the adhesive ability of the material after it becmes fully dissolved. This is absolutely perfect for the print application.

    Full page tests are next....,

    Best regards, Gil
  8. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello All,

    Made and destroyed numerous test samples of Aluminium Foil Paper Card Stock attempting to develop a method for representing panel lines and rivet detail on the foil surface. The closeup below is the result of that work so far. The piece measures approximately 5 x 8 cm.

    Any comments?

    Best regards, Gil
  9. Square

    Square Member

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    I was kinda saving this thought ..... but what about using silver leaf.... theres also gold leaf .... any automotive paint store carrys this stuff and other metals to .... its very thin ..... and 3M is usually the approved glue for it .... and its like about .00015" thick .... and any that doesnt stick can be lightly removed ... as for the reynolds wrap lamination ... has posabilitys in the hub caps for cars use a water proof glue then lightly wet the paper and push into something to form hub caps the aluminum would hold the shape till the paper drys ... think Im going to have to start some experiments gil :) been working on some models and want to really deck them out ...
    Square
  10. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Gil

    It looks as if you have scored the lines with a blunt knife or pin? this can cause a drag effect on the foil, rippling the finish in the groove. I have in the past used a blunt roller cutter to give a nice neat line.
    I will get it back of the wife tomorrow and have a go to show what I mean. To get it now I would have to wake her up and I don't want to be battered to death right now :lol: I gave it to her for making her greeting cards.

    I will post results tomorrow when I come in from work.
    Great idea it will be well intresting to see how this goes.

    Regards

    Rob
  11. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Gil

    A PS to that last post.
    These are some of the embossing bobins I use to make rivit marks and domes they cost about $0.75 each and can be had from most craft stores.

    Regards

    Rob
  12. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Rob,

    Very observant! The closeup is good enough to see the tearing. I know the tool of which you refer to. I took a photo to show most of the tools I use in embossing surfaces.

    The rotary mini "pizza cutter" is too wide to make a credible seam at this scale. I'll have to remove the wheel and grind the edge down to around 2 or 3 mils for it to work right. Another source would be a circular Olfa cutter with the cutting wheel edge dulled (probably the better solution).

    The tools with the spur looking ends are called "pounce wheels" and are used to transfer outlines from paper to wood or material surfaces with the aid of chalk. The wheel punches holes in the paper which is then laid over the target surface and chalk rubbed over the holes. Modelers use them to make quick and dirty rivet lines. The rivet head size is controlled by the underlying supporting surface when the wheels are used. Soft material like cork or newspapers yields old fashioned bridge/train/boiler style rivets. For this application where flush rivets are simulated I used a glass pane. A ruler is used as a guide when the rivet lines are long otherwise they're done freehand.

    Best regards, Gil

    P.S. Almost forgot the scrap piece of acrylic plastic that I scribed a recessed line in with dental pick type tools of the proper width. The scribe line is repeated until the proper depth is attained. Placing the paper over the scribed line and using the pizza cutter wheel to emboss a line allows folding lines to be embossed on the card stock. It also makes impressive rib and longeron lines as well. If you're looking for really crisp square corner folds this is the way to go!
  13. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    I've run into an interesting problem. It's the delamination of the aluminum foil from the card stock. 3M 77 spary and Easy Roller double-sided tape don't have ths problem. All the water based glues seem to share this same problem to varying degrees. The following glues have been tested:

    1.) RC-56 (still under test)
    2.) Aleene's Tacky Glue
    3.) Generic Glue Stick (thinned and unthinned)
    4.) 3M 77 Spray Mounting Cement
    5.) Easy Roller

    Another interesting problem is that the foil delaminates when a sharp inward curve is formed. Again the 3M Spray doesn't have this problem but the Easy Roller does. The RC-56 is still under test but seems to be in betwen the 3M and the Aleene's. The Aleene's did much better on these tests when the first coat was allowed to set before applying a squeegeed coat for bonding the aluminum. The 3M Spray has the problem of an inadequate spray misting. Large droplets result on the surface which show right through the foil when it's burnished down (naturally).

    Enough for now....,

    Best regardds, Gil
  14. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Gil

    I tried my roller on the foil but it was a new one and very sharpe (bad idea to use it) cut clean through it every time :cry: I will be out tomorrow and get roller from the old craft sotre and try again then. Hope it works as I have a plane I want to build in foil card to get the right effect.

    Regards

    Rob
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Rob,

    One big problem with the foil is that it's very delicate or more so than the surface of normal card stock. I think the reflective surface amplifies any small surface imperfection. The thickness of the card backing and the surface on which the embossing takes place control the amount of detail imparted to the work. It's really an art form to get just the right effect for the conditions at hand.

    I tried another adhesive today. It's from Delta Renaissance Foil, Easy Gold Leafing System. It's water based and stays tacky when dry. The system uses plastic film which is vacuum metallic coated and contains a backing of some sort. It's a multi step process of painting down a primer layer followed by two layers of adhesive before the plastic "gold leaf" is layed down (each layer is allowed to dry including the last one before application of the gold leaf). I simply painted some on a card surface, squeegeed till the coating was smooth and let it to set for arround 5~7 minutes while preparing some Al foil for the test. The foil was layed down and rubbed into the surface till smooth. The entire piece was left to set for several hours. The application and rubbing process went very well without any problems. The resulting pieces still have problems with sharp internal radius wrinkling which I now believe is a function of the thickness of the card stock and not just the adhesive used. Has a lot to due with the deflection of surfaces under load and all that material science stuff. Using a lighter card stock may well solve this problem. These tests were all done with 0.3 mm (0.012 mil) card stock. Reducing this to 0.15 mm (0.06 mil) might work to reduce this one drawback. More tomorrow.

    Best regards, Gil

    P.S. All the pictures have disappeared from the thread except a few on this Page?????
  16. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Square,

    I tried out your idea for hubcaps. You'll be glad to know that it's really too easy. I took some of the foil paper cut out a disc and then proceeded to form it in a hemispherical dapping block (jewelers metalsmithing tool) with a wax modeling spoon. You can then polish the results to mirror finish ready for mounting. I'd post a picture but they are being edited out so it's not worth the effort any longer. Hope this doesn't keep you from completing your idea.

    Best regards, Gil
  17. Square

    Square Member

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    Thanx Gil
    The pics are nice but not needed
    Square
  18. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello All,

    The right adhesive has finally been found. It is easy to work with bonds both paper and foil and does not delaminate. In fact the paper feels just like dead soft aluminum when it's deformed and can't be detected from the actual article. Much thanks to all who have helped in this investigation.

    Best regards, Gil
  19. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    Well Man?!?!?!?

    don't leave us in suspense

    TELL US

    Rick
  20. SteveM

    SteveM Member

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    And that would be...:?:

    SteveM