Marine Supply Company

Discussion in 'The Academy' started by spitfire, Mar 13, 2005.

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  1. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    This is my first true scratchbuild, and it's going on the Keating Channel area of my layout. It will be a marine supply and boat repair shop on the lower level, with a sail loft on the upper. I did a lot of surfing on the HABS site to find some reference for the building, and then created a set of plans on the computer.

    I was planning to build it the real way, with post and beam construction, but I found after I had started that it was too flimsy. Back to the drawing board, and the art supply store to get some heavy black cardstock which will be the support for the structure.

    Here's my progress so far.

    First pic is the cut-out cardstock. Second is with the wood partially on, and the third has all the wood siding on. Windows are Tichy and no, they're not upsidedown - the top pane tilts to let in air. Pretty cool.

    Val

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  2. TrainClown

    TrainClown Member

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    It's coming along fine. You can't bite off more than you can chew. There is a way to build buildings board by board. You need to use a jig. You make a jig by printing your plan out on paper and then placing it on a piece of 2" foam (I've used thick congregated cardboard and that works too). Over the plan you put a piece of waxed paper. Now you can see the plan and glue wont stick to it. Now cut out your supports and pin them in place on the jig with straight pins (not through the lumber, but crossing the wood in an "X" pattern to hold it in place.) Then stick your clap boards on using pins to hold them in place while the glue sets up. Once you get all the boards stuck together, the piece becomes quite ridged.

    This is how scale flying models of airplanes are made.



    TrainClown ;)
  3. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks everyone!! And thanks for the info Chris, I'll use that next time out.

    Well, today I built the back side of the building. This board by board construction is very time consuming, but I knew that going in, and I kind of like it. I broke some of the boards rather than cutting to get that splintered look at the ends.

    The windows have not yet been installed. I'm not sure if I like the colour I have for them. I really wanted them to be the same colour as the weathered wood, but it's a tough colour to match.

    Val

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  4. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Just for interest's sake, here is the front elevation of the building. I printed this in black and white to cut out the cardstock.

    Val

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  5. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    More Progress

    Today I finished putting the stripwood on the 2 end pieces and began the interior of the boat repair bay. Since the large doors will be open, I'll be doing a full interior of this part, with post and beam construction.

    The black part on the one end is a roof support for the brick office.

    Val

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  6. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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  7. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Wow!! That's really nice Pete! But then all your modelling is so impressive. :thumb:

    While the Gauge was down yesterday I was forced to do some actual modelling, hehehe.

    Here are a couple more progress shots showing the interior of the boat repair area.

    Val

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  8. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Wow Val!

    That interior is nice (and the outside too...) ;) You should take some shots of your layout through the open door, before you close the building in. Framing the shots like that can add a whole level of realism...

    Andrew
  9. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Cool idea Andrew. Too bad my layout is in such a shambles right now.

    Anyway, here's a shot of the interior part that I'm detailing before I put the roof on.

    Val

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  10. revandy

    revandy Member

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    Hi Val,
    Great job! What size and kind of timber are using? Are you considering a materials list? This is a great project, but you must have a ton of patience!
    Rev. Andy
  11. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Andy, the planks are 3x6 scale lumber. That's a bit thick, but it's what I had on hand. The interior beams are 10x10, which is about right. The cross pieces inside I'm not sure what I used.

    As far as the patience is concerned, I just do as much as I feel like at any given time, then wander off and surf the internet, check the Gauge, do a crossword. When I get bored with that I go back and put on some more planks. Actually, I find I get into a groove with it - kind of mindless work, almost meditative.

    Val
  12. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

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    All scratchbuidling can be tedious but as you say Val its' like meditation in that you can think of the next project or whatever. The colour of the wood looks perfect in the interior photos. Have you coloured them in any way or is it the natural colour?
  13. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks Lynn!

    Robin, I stained it with a light alcohol/ink wash. The outer wood has a slightly darker stain.

    Val
  14. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks a lot guys! I've made a little more progress. Decided on a roofing material, and built the brick office annex. Roofs are just temporarily positioned right now. I am not sure about the brick - I think it might look better if it were also wood.

    Any suggestions?

    Val

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  15. Will_annand

    Will_annand Active Member

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    Val, my first impression would be to make the roof on each section different.
    The roof on the brick part is fine, but I would put either tar paper or wooden shingles on the "older" wooden section. This would give that part of the structure a "been here for awhile" look.

    Just a suggestion.

    BTW, The building looks great. :thumb:
  16. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    I like the mix of wall materials, and I agree with Will that you could also vary the roofing materials. I like the corrugated metal with the wood, and suggest mabe asphalt shingles for the brick annex? And maybe a chimney or two...

    Love the life ring on the door, btw... :)

    Andrew
  17. belg

    belg Member

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    Val I really like the contrast between the two sections,but agree with Will that the roofing should also be different and definately weathered too a different degree as one would be an "addition". My question would be are you going to light the interior? Thanks Pat :thumb:
  18. eightyeightfan1

    eightyeightfan1 Now I'm AMP'd

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    Looks real good Val.
    The floor though, looks too clean. Could use some of its own weathering. Oil spills, paint spills, a pile of dirt next to the broom(worker just swept it out of the way without picking it up) that kinda of stuff.
    Keep up the good work! Make me more jealous.
  19. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions, folks. :thumb: Chimneys (or stacks) are definitely needed. There will be lighting for the interior of the repair shop. As far as weathering the floor, once I install the boat cradle with the boat being repaired, you won't really see much of the floor. But I like the idea of the pile of dirt next to the broom - that's definitely a good one!

    Still need to build the stairs to the second floor and exterior walkway. On the building I have based this on, there is also an exterior sprinkler system, so some pipe are needed. Also, a beam and hoist over the door, build the door...etc. etc.

    My original thinking on the roof was to have 2 different roofing materials as has been suggested. Then I decided that they re-roofed the whole structure fairly recently. Now, I'm leaning towards having the whole thing be a wooden structure. I like the way the brick turned out, but it just looks "wrong" somehow - and ya gotta go with these gut feelings.

    Hopefully I will have some more progress shots later today.

    Val
  20. Will_annand

    Will_annand Active Member

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    Val, my suggestion would be to leave the brick and try changing the roof material. I still say some old wooden shake shingles would look great on the two-story section. :D
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