Making WWI Rotary Engine Cylinders

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by Gil, Apr 2, 2007.

  1. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Bengt!

    Lepercan, it's on WWI rotary engines. People new to rotaries have difficulty in understanding their theory of operation which is distinctly different from radial engines. I won't go into the differences in this thread leaving that for the individual to research.

    I took another look at the post and cringed somewhat wondering what possessed me to post it in the first place (oh well). It would be ok if it were for a cartoon engine but not for a strait faced attempt at suspending someone's disbelief (which it doesn't). I have a few ideas that need to be tried which hopefully will fix some of the disparities of the last attempt. That's probably what possessed me to post it, to force me to show progress on fixing the awful thing....,

    -Gil
  2. bocynjo

    bocynjo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tire Treads on paper Wheels

    Go to Memania fan, check out the tutorial on making realistic wheels for the FW-26 F! racing car. System should work well in other applications too.


    bob (in Victoria, BC)
  3. bocynjo

    bocynjo New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tire Treads on paper Wheels

    Go to Memania fan, check out the tutorial on making realistic wheels for the FW-26 F! racing car. System should work well in other applications too.


    bob (in Victoria, BC)
  4. romfolmar

    romfolmar New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2004
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where is Memania fan?
  5. romfolmar

    romfolmar New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2004
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where is Memania fan?
  6. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,543
    Likes Received:
    0
    http://homepage2.nifty.com/m-FAN/index.htm

    Normally the Fan page is accessed through the Metmania page.

    Couldn't find the tire tutorial, but in any case I really don't see the correlation between a tire and the fins of a radial engine.

    Russell
  7. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,543
    Likes Received:
    0
    http://homepage2.nifty.com/m-FAN/index.htm

    Normally the Fan page is accessed through the Metmania page.

    Couldn't find the tire tutorial, but in any case I really don't see the correlation between a tire and the fins of a radial engine.

    Russell
  8. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    0
    Russell,

    tire treads was mentioned earlier in the thread..............

    Gil................ with the screw punch would the stacked disk method make what you want better............ I know it would be a lot of punching, but that tool does make it fun:grin:

    If you lay out your disks and punch the center hole for alignment then punch the disks free at the correct size.................seems I remember you doing this before............ deja vue:oops: Never mind.
  9. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    0
    Russell,

    tire treads was mentioned earlier in the thread..............

    Gil................ with the screw punch would the stacked disk method make what you want better............ I know it would be a lot of punching, but that tool does make it fun:grin:

    If you lay out your disks and punch the center hole for alignment then punch the disks free at the correct size.................seems I remember you doing this before............ deja vue:oops: Never mind.
  10. romfolmar

    romfolmar New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2004
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Russell
  11. romfolmar

    romfolmar New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2004
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Russell
  12. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Some Progress

    Hi All,

    I'm still waiting for the new disc cutter punch to arrive but in the meantime decided to fill the time perfecting the "corrugagtion through crushing" technique.

    I've improved the technique by overlapping the paper roll. The only problem being experienced now is that the plastic wrap gets "clamped" in between the fin structure. The crush has to be relaxed some to allow the plastic wrap to be removed. Also coating the outside of the with white glue before covering with plastic wrap and crushing helps it to hold its shape better. Using tracing paper (vellum) for the corrugation base yields a fine scale fin structure when crushed. Makes the visual cortex click on cooling fin at first glance which is 85% of the solution..., More latter.

    -Gil
  13. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Some Progress

    Hi All,

    I'm still waiting for the new disc cutter punch to arrive but in the meantime decided to fill the time perfecting the "corrugagtion through crushing" technique.

    I've improved the technique by overlapping the paper roll. The only problem being experienced now is that the plastic wrap gets "clamped" in between the fin structure. The crush has to be relaxed some to allow the plastic wrap to be removed. Also coating the outside of the with white glue before covering with plastic wrap and crushing helps it to hold its shape better. Using tracing paper (vellum) for the corrugation base yields a fine scale fin structure when crushed. Makes the visual cortex click on cooling fin at first glance which is 85% of the solution..., More latter.

    -Gil
  14. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Warning! Harbor Freight Punch Set

    I received the Harbor Freight order in the mail today and was sadly disappointed with the quality of the punch set. One of the punches wasn't ground properly and fit problems were experienced on several more. Instead of attempting to fix it I've decided to return it to Harbor Freight on Monday.

    In the interim an idea occured of how to knock out aligned washers without being a steady handed, eagle eyed professional..., Oh yes, it uses the really cheap variety of hole punches. If you're all good and behave properly I'll show you how to put a razor edge on them without much work..., so be good till then...,

    No buy recommendation:

    [​IMG]
    • [FONT=arial, sans-serif][/FONT][FONT=arial, sans-serif]
    • Made from precision ground hardened alloy steel
    • Accurate to within 0.003''
    • Clear plate for easy alignment
    • Includes nine punches, 9-hole die and blow mold storage case[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]Punches: 1/8'', 3/16'', 1/4'', 5/16'', 3/8'', 7/16'', 1/2'', 5/8'' and 3/4'' diameter; Capacities: 20 gauge sheet steel, 13 gauge aluminum & brass[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]ITEM 47734-2VGA[/FONT]


    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]$39.99[/FONT]


    [​IMG]
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Warning! Harbor Freight Punch Set

    I received the Harbor Freight order in the mail today and was sadly disappointed with the quality of the punch set. One of the punches wasn't ground properly and fit problems were experienced on several more. Instead of attempting to fix it I've decided to return it to Harbor Freight on Monday.

    In the interim an idea occured of how to knock out aligned washers without being a steady handed, eagle eyed professional..., Oh yes, it uses the really cheap variety of hole punches. If you're all good and behave properly I'll show you how to put a razor edge on them without much work..., so be good till then...,

    No buy recommendation:

    [​IMG]
    • [FONT=arial, sans-serif][/FONT][FONT=arial, sans-serif]
    • Made from precision ground hardened alloy steel
    • Accurate to within 0.003''
    • Clear plate for easy alignment
    • Includes nine punches, 9-hole die and blow mold storage case[/FONT]
    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]Punches: 1/8'', 3/16'', 1/4'', 5/16'', 3/8'', 7/16'', 1/2'', 5/8'' and 3/4'' diameter; Capacities: 20 gauge sheet steel, 13 gauge aluminum & brass[/FONT]

    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]ITEM 47734-2VGA[/FONT]


    [FONT=arial, sans-serif]$39.99[/FONT]


    [​IMG]
  16. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Collapsed Corrugation Technique

    Background:
    The following shows the most recent progress in the attempt to achieve real looking cylinder fins at a scale of 1:33. For those who need flex joints, oxygen hose, radiator hose etc. this method is as close to molding it out of the real thing as it comes.

    Technique:
    Dampened tracing paper (25% cotton vellum - 0.07 mm) was wrapped around a 10-24 bolt with an overlap of about one half the circumference. Teflon plumbing tape was then used to wrap it tight around the bolt and the threads chased with a steel ruler to obtain better definition. It was then set on a space heater to dry. I've learned to leave a free tab on the wrapping tape so that it can be easily removed. The tape was removed and the embossed corrugated paper cylinder carefully removed from the bolt. The corrugated cylinder was placed on a 3.97 mm (0.156" - 5/32") and the helix removed by moving one side up by a single thread. PVA glue was spread on the cylinder and between the overlap layers before being wrapped teflon tape. The ends were then trimmed with a razor blade. A telescoping brass tube was then used to push and "crush" the corrugations together first from one end then the other before the piece was set aside to let the glue dry. Any mushrooming at the ends were trimmed with a razor blade. The teflon tape was then carefully removed. The rest is what you see below...,

    -Gil

    P.S. The drill is 3.75 mm in diameter.

    [​IMG]
  17. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Collapsed Corrugation Technique

    Background:
    The following shows the most recent progress in the attempt to achieve real looking cylinder fins at a scale of 1:33. For those who need flex joints, oxygen hose, radiator hose etc. this method is as close to molding it out of the real thing as it comes.

    Technique:
    Dampened tracing paper (25% cotton vellum - 0.07 mm) was wrapped around a 10-24 bolt with an overlap of about one half the circumference. Teflon plumbing tape was then used to wrap it tight around the bolt and the threads chased with a steel ruler to obtain better definition. It was then set on a space heater to dry. I've learned to leave a free tab on the wrapping tape so that it can be easily removed. The tape was removed and the embossed corrugated paper cylinder carefully removed from the bolt. The corrugated cylinder was placed on a 3.97 mm (0.156" - 5/32") and the helix removed by moving one side up by a single thread. PVA glue was spread on the cylinder and between the overlap layers before being wrapped teflon tape. The ends were then trimmed with a razor blade. A telescoping brass tube was then used to push and "crush" the corrugations together first from one end then the other before the piece was set aside to let the glue dry. Any mushrooming at the ends were trimmed with a razor blade. The teflon tape was then carefully removed. The rest is what you see below...,

    -Gil

    P.S. The drill is 3.75 mm in diameter.

    [​IMG]
  18. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cylinder Head Fins

    Cylinder Head Fins
    The following item was made from one of the experimental collapsed corrugation technique cylinders. It was cut open along one seam, flattended out, stretched out slightly and punched out with a hole punch. The piece was then glued to another thicker disc.

    -Gil

    P.S. Still continuing on with this investigation but at a much lower rate due to time allocation constraints.

    [​IMG]
  19. Gil

    Gil Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2004
    Messages:
    1,981
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cylinder Head Fins

    Cylinder Head Fins
    The following item was made from one of the experimental collapsed corrugation technique cylinders. It was cut open along one seam, flattended out, stretched out slightly and punched out with a hole punch. The piece was then glued to another thicker disc.

    -Gil

    P.S. Still continuing on with this investigation but at a much lower rate due to time allocation constraints.

    [​IMG]
  20. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is really good, particularly since it doesn't involve exotic materials. (Even if I have not come across Teflon tape yet, I now have a reason to keep my eyes open...)

    The result is magnificent. And I am happy about the vellum paper and PVA glue bits - those I should be able to handle!

    The cylinder top bit is ingenious.

    One thought - it might even be possible to make taped cylinders this way, shouldn't it? If you make the original slightly oversize, a wedgeshaped cut could yield a tapered part of the cylinder, married to a straight part, right?

    Leif