logging trawler

Discussion in 'Logging, Mining and Industrial Railroads' started by rebel, Nov 20, 2004.

  1. rebel

    rebel New Member

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    need info if anyone has made a trawler or schooner for hauling logs, need one for a dock area, most logging sites dont seem to deal with that part of the logging production
  2. m_reusser

    m_reusser Member

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    0000000000
  3. Muddy Creek

    Muddy Creek Member

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    Up in my part of the mountains, when logging was at its peak in the early 1900's, softwood logs were towed to the mill on the lake in booms by small steamboats. The heavier hardwood logs were loaded on barges made of softwood logs and towed. (I've seen a photo of a Barnhart loader sitting on a crude barge.) Booms were also used on slow-moving rivers, I believe.

    Was hauling unsawn logs inside ships common on the west coast?

    Wayne
  4. m_reusser

    m_reusser Member

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  5. rebel

    rebel New Member

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    ment lumber, had logs on mind
  6. Muddy Creek

    Muddy Creek Member

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    If you're near San Franciso, you can tour the C. A. Thayer, a schooner built for lumber transport in the 1890's. It's been restored and is currently owned by the National Park Service. At 219' the Thayer would be an imposing feature in your dock area.

    You can see it at: http://www.nps.gov/safr/local/thayer.html

    Be sure to click on the Thayer Restoration link for lots of photos & a QuickTime tour of the interior of the hull.

    Wayne
  7. rebel

    rebel New Member

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    live real close, thanks, great pics
  8. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Found these two articles in the Jan. and April issues of the Timberman magazine. Thought you'd find them of interest.

    Jimmy B
    Lawton, NV

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  9. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    First cut from first article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  10. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Second cut from first article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  11. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Third cut from first article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  12. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Next article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  13. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Next piece of the second article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  14. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    Last piece of the second article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  15. lassenlogger

    lassenlogger Member

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    A cut from the last article.

    Jimmy "B"
    Lawton, NV

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  16. fp9er

    fp9er New Member

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    You may be interested in this, from "Ships Through the Centuries"
    http://collections.ic.gc.ca/maritime_museum/exploration/boattypes3.html

    <snip>
    The 991 ton Thermopylae was designed by Walter Hood and build in Aberdeen in 1868 and was claimed to be the faster sailing clipper in the world. She was the great rival of the clipper 'Cutty Sark'. She spent her twilight years in Victoria B.C. running lumber to the orient.
    <snip>

    The 36" Revell Model works out to 1:70 Scale....Pretty close to HO. The kit, to my knowledge, is no longer made in this (large) scale. I have one, partly built...even have the satin green paint that the hull should be!

    Do you have a big enough harbour, though? You'd either have to cut a hole in the harbour to set the ship at her waterline, or you'd have to trim the hull to make a "waterline" model. Some of the vaccumform sails are missing but if I had this sitting at a dock I'd rig it sans sails.

    The model, BTW can be build as a square rigger or a barque....there are instructions for both. (Wow--this famous ship was Canadian-owned at the end of her days! )

    Paul McD.
  17. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    The 68' two mast schooner "StephenTaber" (which currently sails out of Maine) was built in 1861 for the brick trade, and later carried pulpwood loads on Long Island Sound, and down east. When fully loaded, her decks were all but awash, and the load stacked high on deck, made handling sail a little difficult.
    Nice pics of a 5 mast lumber schooner. Many of these had doors in the bows, for loading long boards, that couldn't be loaded through deck hatches.
    Pete
  18. hswn

    hswn Member

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    The Narrow Gauge Gazette ran a 2 part artical in the 70's or early 80's on a "dog hole steamer" I think. Try searching the modle train mag. index http://www.index.mrmag.com/
    Brady
  19. rebel

    rebel New Member

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    great place to go, found it may-june 1980 page 40