Logging East Tennessee on the C&S RR

Discussion in 'Logging, Mining and Industrial Railroads' started by Doctor G, Nov 17, 2008.

  1. Hot Cinder

    Hot Cinder New Member

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    Beautiful Layout Tom :thumb:

    HC
  2. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Thanks HC and welcome to Zealot. See my buddy Bill Nelson's layout here too. He has some more great Tennessee logging action just a few miles away from the C&S.
    Doc Tom:wave:
  3. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    The Logging Branch Lines of the C&S RR

    In 1929 there were 4 logging branches of the C&S RR. These branches penetrated deeply into the mountainous wilderness where the ringing of axe and the singing of saw signalled a bustling logging industry that kept good men working at the start of The Great Depression.
    The 4 branchlines were: 1) Christine Branch 2) Bottomlands Branch 3) The Nickel Camp Branch and 4) The Crazy Eight Line.

    The first set of photos show a "logging meet" as a loaded log train meets a string of empties in the Christine yard on the "Christine Branch" about 4 miles from the intersection with the C&S mainline. The thundering staccato of geared locomotive exhaust echoes off the nearby mountains.
    Doc Tom:mrgreen:

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  4. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    More Logging action on the Christine Branch

    While the logging trains were making their moves in tha Christine Branch yard the company photographer snapped a few photos of the well used equipment.

    Pictured are Heisler #3 and a scratchbuilt logging flat. The flat was modeled after Little River RR prototypes including the side mounted brake wheel.
    Doc Tom:wave:

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  5. ytter_man

    ytter_man Member

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    Funny you mention side mounted brake wheels, all my equipment will have side mounts - the upright stands break off when logs start flying around (and my fingers!)sign1

    Nice!:thumb:
  6. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Sometimes these side mounted brake wheels snag scenery and foliage. Time to get the road crews out cutting brush!!!
    Doc Tom:cry:
  7. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Moving Day on the C&S

    Camp #1 and #2 further down the Christine branch need more housing for loggers as operations continue to grow.

    So best way to do it is to load up the camp houses built on skids and use the Barnhart to haul them to the site. Instant housing!!!

    Included is a prototype photograph from the Little River RR of a load of camp cars heading to "string town" where a string of camp cars was set out.
    Doc Tom :wave:

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  8. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Crazy Horse Bridge on the Christine Branch

    With wheels squealing and screaming, the logging trains take the curved Crazy Horse bridge high over Kit Creek.

    This is the same steel trestle bridge modeled by Malcolm Furlow in his book about building a narrow guage western RR.... The San Juan Central. Although this bridge has a decidely more Eastern RR flavor to it.

    Included is a photo of "flat car surfing" a very dangerous sport on a rocking and rolling logging train 84 feet above a river.
    Doc Tom:eek:

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  9. Hot Cinder

    Hot Cinder New Member

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    I finally read the entire thread! What a showpiece, story, and history lesson. Do you have any references of a device called a poke (name may be wrong) it was used to push logs off log cars into the mill pond? It was somehow powered. I had read a book referring to this device but no reference photos were included. Can't recall the book either.

    HC
  10. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Jill Poke Log Unloader

    Hi HC,
    Glad you like the thread. This site is so easy to use that I have enjoyed documenting my RR for the first time.

    What I think you are referring to is called a Jill Poke Log Unloader. I got several "hits" when I googled that term. Keystone made a kit for this in HO scale. I have attached a picture. Basically it is a stationary pivoting metal arm that would engage a log on a moving (slow) log car and as it moved along would push the logs off the car.

    Thanks for contributing to this thread with such good questions. Other good folks may have modeled a Jill Poke and hopefully will post here.
    Doc Tom:wave:

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  11. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Doc Tom....I can't believe the level of detail you've incorporated into this layout....It's one-of-a-kind..!! You really should look for someone to publish it in the model media...
    Keep those pics a-comin'....:thumb:
  12. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Thanks Gus!!!!

    I have no idea how to get the layout in the "model media." Glad to give it a whirl if you all know how. I have just learned how to use a digital camera although I did 35mm photography in High School and College decades ago.

    I guess I could ask my darling daughter how to make a CD disc and send it to a choo choo magazine.

    Thanks for all the support you guys have given me. This a very "user friendly" web site for model railroading.
    Doc Tom:wave:
  13. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Logging Camp #1 on the Christine Branch

    Here is where the C&S generates its major source of revenue....the logging camps.

    This is Camp#1 on the Christine branch and we see old #1 working the site with a steam powered hoist on a modified MDC flat car. Keeping all the equipment working requires the support of trains with coal, cable and at times during the summer water tanks for the thirsty steam powered machinery. The loggers also need a ride to work and the C&S RR is only too willing to oblige.
    Doc Tom:wave:

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  14. Hot Cinder

    Hot Cinder New Member

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    Thanks! thats it! I always assumed some brute would be on the other end forcing the logs off by hand.

    HC
  15. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Camp #2 and the log roll

    Further down the Christine Branch is Logging Camp #2. Unlike Camp #1 with all the hoists and loaders Camp #2 loads log cars by a log rollway.

    I have included a prototype photo showing how this was done in the classic steam logging railroad era. I love the old Climax in the protoytpe Photo.

    Doc Tom:mrgreen:

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  16. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    The Nickel Camp Branch

    The second major logging branchline off the C&S main is the "Nickel Camp Branch".

    This branchline leaves the mainline at Stanleyville and works it way up the slope of Grandfather Mountain to logging camps #3 (abandoned),#4, #5 (The Nickel Camp) and camp#6.

    Here is a shot of a Shay bringing up a string of empties breaking out of the gloom of a tunnel into the sun on the north face of Grandfather Mountain.

    Here at the tunnel portal is the spur to abandoned camp #3 to the left.

    In the foreground is the turnout for camp #4.

    Hurlene and Otis's shack...the "HO Shack" sit right at the turnout. Otis is a junk collector and a train lover from way back. It was true love that led Hurlene with "her man" to this picturesque site on the side of a mountain with a train track in the back yard and a "Junque Repository"on the way to the "facility." Why she even is happy to wash Otis's overalls....mountain love!!!!!!

    Doc Tom:rolleyes:

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  17. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Only a Shay, Heisler or Climax could

    Here is a shot of the "Nickel Branch" heading up grade from Camp #4 to The Nickel Camp on the south side of Grandfather Mountain.

    A locomotive engineer is happy he is aboard a Shay, Heisler or Climax when confronted with this view of a curving 6% to 7% grade outside his cab window.
    Doc Tom:wave:

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  18. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Active Member

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    I'm just guessing here, but taking a leak at oh-dark thirty after a shot or two of "shine" would appear to be somewhat problematic for either of them. Or is that why the tracks are a little bit more rusty in front of their house? :mrgreen:
  19. allaboutkevin

    allaboutkevin New Member

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    very cool layout.. a couple of inspiring pictures for my upcoming pacific northwest n scale logging layout...
  20. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Fortunately the logging train only comes by once or twice a day and not in the pee errrr wee hours of the morning. Otherwise that headlight would surely show an embarassed local citizen.
    Doc Tom:cry: