Learning about glue

Discussion in 'Tools of the Trade' started by hapes, Oct 20, 2006.

  1. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    I use a glue syringe I purchased from my local Hobby shop it is sold for use with Cyan glues. You can see in my avatar. The syringe comes with two interchangeable tips and I use the smallest tip. The problem you are experiencing is because you have an air bubble in the syringe. Tilt the tip up and let it sit until the bubble goes to the top. Force out the air until you get only glue. You can not compress a fluid, but you can compress a gas so when you push on the plunger you compress the air bubble until the glue flows and when you stop the bubble continues to expand and you end up with glue dribbles.


    As for glue I use Greven Wiccoll but alas the only source for the glue in the US was Lighthouse. So when I run out I will be back to using Allene's and good old Elmer’s.

    As for how good is Elmer’s white glue-all I have 30 plus year old paper models that were built using Elmer’s and they show no degrading in the glue joints. Personally I am not a fan of UHU solvent based glues but some modelers love it. The UHU craft glues that I have seen and used are OK, no better no worse then any of the other craft glues. Also keep some Cyno Gap filling glue handy it is excellent for gluing metal to paper and wood.

    Jim Nunn
  2. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    I use a glue syringe I purchased from my local Hobby shop it is sold for use with Cyan glues. You can see in my avatar. The syringe comes with two interchangeable tips and I use the smallest tip. The problem you are experiencing is because you have an air bubble in the syringe. Tilt the tip up and let it sit until the bubble goes to the top. Force out the air until you get only glue. You can not compress a fluid, but you can compress a gas so when you push on the plunger you compress the air bubble until the glue flows and when you stop the bubble continues to expand and you end up with glue dribbles.


    As for glue I use Greven Wiccoll but alas the only source for the glue in the US was Lighthouse. So when I run out I will be back to using Allene's and good old Elmer’s.

    As for how good is Elmer’s white glue-all I have 30 plus year old paper models that were built using Elmer’s and they show no degrading in the glue joints. Personally I am not a fan of UHU solvent based glues but some modelers love it. The UHU craft glues that I have seen and used are OK, no better no worse then any of the other craft glues. Also keep some Cyno Gap filling glue handy it is excellent for gluing metal to paper and wood.

    Jim Nunn
  3. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Elmer's Glue-All. School Glue is a good substitute, if a little thinner.
    Stay away from the washable Elmers. Too thin to get a decent bond, tends to warp the paper due to water absorbtion.

    I've tried Alene's, but found it too thick and unforgiving for the way I work. Especially with the syringe applicator I use.

    Have no experience with UHU as of yet, but I tend to stay away from solvent based glues...

    3M spray adhesive is great for bonding large areas, like when you are laminating sheets together.

    I very very very rarely use cyranoacetates (superglues). Generally only a spot on the one end of a very long seam line, just to stick the end down. But I've started avoiding this as well, in favor of holding the end with a pair of hemostats (surgical clamps)...
  4. ekuth

    ekuth Guest

    Elmer's Glue-All. School Glue is a good substitute, if a little thinner.
    Stay away from the washable Elmers. Too thin to get a decent bond, tends to warp the paper due to water absorbtion.

    I've tried Alene's, but found it too thick and unforgiving for the way I work. Especially with the syringe applicator I use.

    Have no experience with UHU as of yet, but I tend to stay away from solvent based glues...

    3M spray adhesive is great for bonding large areas, like when you are laminating sheets together.

    I very very very rarely use cyranoacetates (superglues). Generally only a spot on the one end of a very long seam line, just to stick the end down. But I've started avoiding this as well, in favor of holding the end with a pair of hemostats (surgical clamps)...
  5. rockpaperscissor

    rockpaperscissor Member

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    Elmer's or Aleene's for me - whichever I happen to have on hand. I'm right handed, so I usually squeeze out a small amount of glue on the back of my left hand between the thumb and index finger - just enough for the job at hand. I use small pieces of scrap card as applicators, selecting a size that is appropriate for what I am gluing. I rarely apply the glue to the glue tabs. Instead, I spread a thin, uniform coat to the inside of the piece that the glue tabs will be attached to. After joining the two parts I use needle nosed pliers and/or a small spatula (a chemists spatula for picking up powdered chemicals) to ensure good contact between the tabs and the glue film on the ajoining part.
    Regards,

    Don
  6. rockpaperscissor

    rockpaperscissor Member

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    Elmer's or Aleene's for me - whichever I happen to have on hand. I'm right handed, so I usually squeeze out a small amount of glue on the back of my left hand between the thumb and index finger - just enough for the job at hand. I use small pieces of scrap card as applicators, selecting a size that is appropriate for what I am gluing. I rarely apply the glue to the glue tabs. Instead, I spread a thin, uniform coat to the inside of the piece that the glue tabs will be attached to. After joining the two parts I use needle nosed pliers and/or a small spatula (a chemists spatula for picking up powdered chemicals) to ensure good contact between the tabs and the glue film on the ajoining part.
    Regards,

    Don
  7. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    I use all different kinds of glue, depending on the job at hand. Aleene's Tacky both regular and quick grab; Elmer's glue all; UHU office pen; glue sticks; super glue. The super glue is good to reenforce small parts and keep some parts straight and pointy, like pennants or steeple tops or other architectural details. Those detail parts can sometimes delaminate or curl and don't look so good. I soak the part with the super glue and let it dry. It helps it retain the proper shape. :)
  8. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    I use all different kinds of glue, depending on the job at hand. Aleene's Tacky both regular and quick grab; Elmer's glue all; UHU office pen; glue sticks; super glue. The super glue is good to reenforce small parts and keep some parts straight and pointy, like pennants or steeple tops or other architectural details. Those detail parts can sometimes delaminate or curl and don't look so good. I soak the part with the super glue and let it dry. It helps it retain the proper shape. :)
  9. hapes

    hapes New Member

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    Wow, didn't expect this much of a reply.

    I haven't noticed a significant delay in bonding and drying time with the washable stuff. I think I'll move to the non-washable Elmer's or Aleene's when
    this bottle is empty.

    Currently I use a square of paper (cut from the scrap of my model) as my glue holding mechanism, dip my finger in it lightly (just to get a dot of glue on my finger), then smear that on the tabs for this model. I think the toothpick thing would work for me as well, for smaller joints. I suspect I would have trouble with a paper applicator as discussed in previous posts.

    Some of you have pointed out that you don't like glue smears on viewable areas, I have to agree, tho I'm having trouble avoiding it, with my clumsy hands! :) Fortunately, I can excuse that with 'first model, that I don't really care about! OK, darn, I do care.'

    Anyway, thanks for the responses!
  10. hapes

    hapes New Member

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    Wow, didn't expect this much of a reply.

    I haven't noticed a significant delay in bonding and drying time with the washable stuff. I think I'll move to the non-washable Elmer's or Aleene's when
    this bottle is empty.

    Currently I use a square of paper (cut from the scrap of my model) as my glue holding mechanism, dip my finger in it lightly (just to get a dot of glue on my finger), then smear that on the tabs for this model. I think the toothpick thing would work for me as well, for smaller joints. I suspect I would have trouble with a paper applicator as discussed in previous posts.

    Some of you have pointed out that you don't like glue smears on viewable areas, I have to agree, tho I'm having trouble avoiding it, with my clumsy hands! :) Fortunately, I can excuse that with 'first model, that I don't really care about! OK, darn, I do care.'

    Anyway, thanks for the responses!
  11. Larry Marshall

    Larry Marshall Member

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    Nobody has said a word about how good (or not) Elmer's Glue-All is, though I recommended it in preference to Elmers "Washable Glue", which is a very watery version of Elmers Glue-All. It was "School Glue" that negative comments have been made about and they're certainly real enough. While I don't use Elmers Glue-All for my card models, I've never had anything come apart that's been glued using it.


    Cheers -- Larry
  12. Larry Marshall

    Larry Marshall Member

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    Nobody has said a word about how good (or not) Elmer's Glue-All is, though I recommended it in preference to Elmers "Washable Glue", which is a very watery version of Elmers Glue-All. It was "School Glue" that negative comments have been made about and they're certainly real enough. While I don't use Elmers Glue-All for my card models, I've never had anything come apart that's been glued using it.


    Cheers -- Larry
  13. Larry Marshall

    Larry Marshall Member

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    It would probably help you considerably if you used one of the slightly thicker glues and stopped putting glue on the ends of your fingers. If I get glue on any of my fingers I immediately wash my hands. I never purposefully put it there. I can't say that I completely avoid glue on my models but to me, glue on a part means I need to make a new part.

    Your compass project is a fairly sophisticated 'first project' unless you have a lot of modeling experience so don't worry about any of the details for a while. You've got a full plate in any case. Can't wait to see the finished model.

    Cheers --- Larry
  14. Larry Marshall

    Larry Marshall Member

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    It would probably help you considerably if you used one of the slightly thicker glues and stopped putting glue on the ends of your fingers. If I get glue on any of my fingers I immediately wash my hands. I never purposefully put it there. I can't say that I completely avoid glue on my models but to me, glue on a part means I need to make a new part.

    Your compass project is a fairly sophisticated 'first project' unless you have a lot of modeling experience so don't worry about any of the details for a while. You've got a full plate in any case. Can't wait to see the finished model.

    Cheers --- Larry
  15. Fishcarver

    Fishcarver Active Member

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    I like Aleene's Quick-Tack glue as well.
    Have you thought about using a small paintbrush as a glue applicator? I have some real cheap #0 rounds that I pick up at a dollar store. Just wash them out wioth soap and water when you're done and they will last almost indefinitely!
    Jim
  16. Fishcarver

    Fishcarver Active Member

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    I like Aleene's Quick-Tack glue as well.
    Have you thought about using a small paintbrush as a glue applicator? I have some real cheap #0 rounds that I pick up at a dollar store. Just wash them out wioth soap and water when you're done and they will last almost indefinitely!
    Jim
  17. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest


    I mentioned it larry :) course my building technique back then was way less than perfect (now its perfect - yeah right!) heh heh I think I was putting it on a bit thin and quite often it would dry a bit much before putting the pieces together. back then I didnt always have the piece close enough to the actual needed shape before gluing.... so it was likely my fault those are falling apart. But who knows for sure. I was using glue stick on my first few sometimes too so it mgiht have been that. It was soooo many models ago ;)

    Ignore me now - I ramble on needlessly!
    Chris
  18. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest


    I mentioned it larry :) course my building technique back then was way less than perfect (now its perfect - yeah right!) heh heh I think I was putting it on a bit thin and quite often it would dry a bit much before putting the pieces together. back then I didnt always have the piece close enough to the actual needed shape before gluing.... so it was likely my fault those are falling apart. But who knows for sure. I was using glue stick on my first few sometimes too so it mgiht have been that. It was soooo many models ago ;)

    Ignore me now - I ramble on needlessly!
    Chris
  19. hapes

    hapes New Member

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    The last modeling experience I had before this was many years ago, building some plastic airplanes. But paper modeling, with tabs at least, seems to have some fairly basic principles that you can follow.

    We may be getting a little off topic, but the compass model doesn't seem THAT complex. I've had a few sketchy areas, like the domes aren't precisely round, and connecting the inside dome to the outside dome was a little tricky (made more difficult, I suspect, by the watery glue and fingers method of gluing). I'm curious about the latch mechanism, as there are no tabs to glue it to the box. Anyway, once it's done, I'll slap up a pic or five.
  20. hapes

    hapes New Member

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    The last modeling experience I had before this was many years ago, building some plastic airplanes. But paper modeling, with tabs at least, seems to have some fairly basic principles that you can follow.

    We may be getting a little off topic, but the compass model doesn't seem THAT complex. I've had a few sketchy areas, like the domes aren't precisely round, and connecting the inside dome to the outside dome was a little tricky (made more difficult, I suspect, by the watery glue and fingers method of gluing). I'm curious about the latch mechanism, as there are no tabs to glue it to the box. Anyway, once it's done, I'll slap up a pic or five.