Larry DownUnder

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by Gil, Mar 19, 2006.

  1. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Charlie,

    Looks like a category 5 as it slammed into Queensland later downgraded to category 4 after it waded ashore. Seems to be too far North to give any drought relief to the South. Any updates?

    -Gil
  2. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    That's about what happened:

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200603/s1595732.htm

    Lots of damage to houses and crops but fortunately no reports of injuries so far. There was a fair bit of warning on Larry's arrival (it's been spinning up since last week) so the beachside areas of Cairns were evacuated yesterday (Sunday). How much drought relief we get will depend on which way the ex-cyclone goes - if the monsoon pushes it south we could get useful rain.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  3. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    What a start! I'm afraid this years storms are going to make last years look like summer showers! If I lived on the coast of anywhere I would be packed and ready!

    Glad people took the warnings to heart and there aren't any reported injuries yet!
  4. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    Just an update to Larry....

    The cyclone completely trashed some small towns south of Cairns - the best guess is that it did a billion dollars damage. There won't be much tropical fruit around for the next year or so because all the banana and avocado farms were flattened. Amazingly there were no serious injuries - the local authorities have put that down to years of planning and the Queensland building codes.

    It's close to the end of the cyclone season in Australia (Nov - March) so this might be the last one this year.

    Regards,

    Charlie
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Charlie,

    That's truly amazing. I guesss the Gulf Coast of the U.S. has some lessons to learn. I guess there won't be any guamole dip with the banana daquiries for a while...,

    -Gil
  6. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    I've lived on the Gulf Coast of Florida for over half my life and have gone through numerous hurricanes and tropical storms since the seventies. I've come out of every one of them in good shape because I know where the risks lie. I'm also prepared. the problem lately seems to be that too many folks don't anymore. Currently, there is a campaign in the media to prepare now for the hurricane season. It includes such basic things as having a three day supply of food and water on hand, and other necessities. I was buying a few cases of bottled water, as it was on sale at the commissary, and I mentioned to the checkout clerk that I was stocking up for the "season"--She said I was a fool to waste my money, when they'd be giving it away after a storm. Well that's fine and dandy, but first the stuff has to get there following a storm. After hurricane Ivan, there was only one two line highway available to get into Pensacola--all the other highways had damaged bridges. New Orleans was in a similar situation...most roads were closed. People buy and build in flood prone coastal areas and on the barrier islands--a recipe for disaster. They fail to take responsibility for their own survival. The lesson the Gulf coast (and the rest of the US east coast) needs to learn is that the hurricanes WILL come (Imagine a storm like Andrew or Katrina hitting Boston, New York or Philadelphia--they're not out of the zone--ask the old timers who remember). and that the first line of preparedeness is in the individual.