L183 HS Zakynthos. Hellenic Navy LCAC "Zubr" class, scale 1/200 by...

Discussion in 'Ship & Watercraft Models' started by strk, Apr 25, 2012.

  1. strk

    strk Member

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    (paper) Modern Naval Warfare, aka "strk".

    Today I want to show You build report of (already finished) Russian LCAC 1232 Pomornik class, under flag of The Hellenic Navy.

    Please, have understanding for this (once again) copy+paste report. This is due to lack of free time...


    [​IMG]
    Here's my vision in 3D virtuality:
    [​IMG]

    There are only few, low-res photos showing L183, so the main reference for my build, is his twin-brother L182:
    [​IMG]

    Like in any other builds, I started from framework. It is relatively simple, groove joints in use:
    [​IMG]
    U-element is an air-cushion rubber curtain bearing frame(???darn, I can not better describe this element)

    Framework is reinforced with main deck element and bearing frame from below:
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Hull skin. Parts are printed on 160g/m2 color paper. It was a great choice: it is enough rigid, but thin and forms well. Rounded edge (diameter 1mm) between deck and hull side proved it:
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Above pictures show also narrow tabs (<1mm), very helpful in putting the parts together. Hull skin parts are joined also with tabs, from inside:
    [​IMG]
    This is extremely simple and effective way.

    Same way in fore section:
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Done:
    [​IMG]
  2. strk

    strk Member

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    Build continuation:

    -fore steering nozzles? Exhausts? I dont know:
    [​IMG]

    Stern loading door:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The hull is almost ready:
    [​IMG]

    Next step: air-cushion rubber curtain.
  3. strk

    strk Member

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    Rubber curtain. Again, I use color paper 160g/m2. Pictures explain everything, construction is simple, no framework neccessary

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
  4. strk

    strk Member

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  5. strk

    strk Member

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    Air-cushion turbines exhaust doors. Gluing small elements with rounded corners is not easy (no lines to score and bend along), so heres my solution with use of water glue (water makes the paper softer):
    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]
  6. strk

    strk Member

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    This is the most challenging, difficult and exhausting element of this model, requiring cold blood, a hell of patience, and a huge f-words dictionary [​IMG]))). Despite its simple construction (only three parts), I needed almost four hours to complete a single ring:

    -this is internal, forming element, diameter ~27mm
    [​IMG]

    -outer skin with forming element:
    [​IMG]

    -outer skin must be carefully formed,
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    -both parts glued together:
    [​IMG]

    -one by one, I glued every "leaf" to the internal forming element:
    [​IMG]

    -done:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    As You will see later, this is not proper approach to designing and building cowlings. But with little help of my friend (thx John), the final effect is much much better!
  7. strk

    strk Member

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    Superstructure and aft loading ramp.
    Windows are cut out, and a strip of black paper is glued inside:

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The idea of gluing a stripe of black paper from inside is old, but if U want to get better effect use a 3,5" or 5 1/4" floppy disk. To be precise, "open" it with a knife, remove its plastic cover and use that black foil held inside. It has nice, glossy black color...
  8. strk

    strk Member

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    Four turbo blowers, AK630 CIWS guns:
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    and MR-123 fire control radar mount:
    [​IMG]
  9. strk

    strk Member

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    Cowlings, another approach:

    Main elements (left) are already glued together, next is shaping ring, and other rings. On the right, two rings glued into one, w/out using tabs.
    [​IMG]

    Shaping ring glued in:
    [​IMG]

    Almost done. All elements are glued w/out tabs. All what left is internal, closing ring:
    [​IMG]

    Done! Cowling in its mounting position. External seams are facing downwards, internal - upwards. Thanks to this, seams are invisible:
    [​IMG]

    Here's the picture showing seams. I messed it a little, but IMHO it still looks good
    [​IMG]
  10. strk

    strk Member

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    Some tiny details:

    -boxes and optical sight base in front of the superstructure:
    [​IMG]

    MR-123 Bass Tilt fire control radar. Not finished, but already looks nice:
    [​IMG]
  11. strk

    strk Member

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    cowl and engine base/rudder (one of three):
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]



    Finished MR123 radar, other fire control equipment, and - one (of three) propeller inside the cowl:

    [​IMG][​IMG]
  12. strk

    strk Member

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    Life-rafts, hawse-holes, next two propellers and three rudders:

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    Main mast. So called copper-wire work
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Copper wire must be treated with sand paper (it makes gluing and painting easier).
    The best way is to glue a square piece of sandpaper, lets say 1x1", onto square piece of HDF the same size.Just roll piece of copper wire under this makeshift tool, making its surface scratchy.
  13. strk

    strk Member

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    The last stage of the build, are handrailings.
    This way is effective, rather easy and cheap.
    Stanchions are made of ~0.3mm diameter copper wire, the links along the decks - of thin elastic thread (nylon?), obtained from my wife's stockings [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Each elastic thread consists many ultra-thin fibres. It is important to not damage the structure - if so, the thread will start to curl and loose fibres, becoming useless.
    [​IMG]
    These ~16 cm long threads can be stretched to about 200% of their length, are easy to glue and paint even with acrylic paints.

    [​IMG][​IMG]

    If You want to do this the same way, do not forget to make holes in the deck for the stanchions! Use small diameter (same as stanchions) drill bit.
  14. strk

    strk Member

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    Finished model.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    and Ship's Modeling magazine (Poland) cover:thumb::

    [​IMG]

    Google T?umacz


    See You in next project, I will try to make live build report.
  15. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Amazing, STRK! As always you build the models as fantastically as you design them! :)
  16. strk

    strk Member

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  17. marrecar

    marrecar New Member

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    Omg, that looks great... It's a real shame that there are no magazines about modelling in my country... Keep up the good work!
  18. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Not sure which country your from, but there isn't diddly squat in the U.S. of A. either! I share your sentiments.
  19. Vince

    Vince Member

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    Amazingly realistic. Great job, thanks for sharing with us!