Jumping ship

Discussion in 'G / O / S Scale Model Trains' started by 1GUNRUNNER, Apr 24, 2007.

  1. 1GUNRUNNER

    1GUNRUNNER New Member

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    I have been annoying the HO guys with some of my newbie questions but, have now realized I need to go bigger. I am going to do an early 20th century logging scene. HO is going to be too small for what I have to work with. What guage will give me a track with ties that is in the 4" width area and have a good selection of the era I am looking for?
  2. ozzy

    ozzy Active Member

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    wow, i think G is as close as your going to get as far as track,
  3. Torpedo

    Torpedo Member

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  4. fsm1000

    fsm1000 Member

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    G scale will do it unless you go to live steam. :D
  5. 1GUNRUNNER

    1GUNRUNNER New Member

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    4" is what I have to run on. It will be an overhead layout that runs on a 4" beam. It is about 9' in the air and the HO was just going to be too small.
  6. ozzy

    ozzy Active Member

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    if thats why, then go with O.
  7. 1GUNRUNNER

    1GUNRUNNER New Member

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    Well where is the difference between O and G?
  8. Cannonball

    Cannonball More Trains Than Brains

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    O is smaller than G.
    Ho is half of O
    N is just really tiny.

    If you've only got a 4" wide space, you're going to want to run O gauge to give your train some balancing room. If you go with G, you're not going to have enough room. Personally, I would still run Ho just to be safe but O will run.
  9. spankybird

    spankybird OTTS Founder

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    To put in just a little differant way.

    O gauge is twice the size of HO

    G gauge is twice the size of O gauge (in some cases)

    N gauge is Half the size of HO

    :thumb:
  10. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    G is more than twice the scale of O. US O is 1/48, UK O is 1/43, some European O is 1/45. What is often called G encompasses several scales. "True" G is 1/22.5. F is 1/20.3. These are more than twice the size of O, but are only used to model narrow gauge prototypes. Large scale models of standard gauge prototypes are Gauge 1 (1/32) or the now-more-common-but-nameless 1/29.
  11. Cannonball

    Cannonball More Trains Than Brains

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    How can it be more common if it's nameless? :confused:
    :mrgreen:
  12. Triplex

    Triplex Active Member

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    Search me... Then again, nothing about the various forms of "large scale" ever made sense to me.
  13. N Gauger

    N Gauger 1:20.3 Train Addict

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    If you really want to go with O - then that would be better than G, mostly because of what's available vs. cost..

    But HO looks good on my 1 X 4" shelf :) :) All around my dining room.... about 9" high.....

    Attached Files:

  14. Travellar

    Travellar Member

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    I'm just glad that I realised I mis-read the original post, I thought he said 4 foot ties!