"How to Build Large Scale Dioramas"

Discussion in 'Dioramas & Displays' started by JohnReid, Jul 7, 2007.

  1. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Modifying the "T"
    Before I go any further with the T I had better figure out where and how I am going to stash all the Camel parts and pieces.The 4 wings will be attached to the fuselage and will be resting up against the side probably held on with rope etc..The center section and its struts will be left on the fuselage for easy re-assembly.The horizontal stab ,fin and elevators will be strapped to the side of the T and the ailerons on the roof rack.
    I hate to cut this nice kit up but I have to re-design it a bit for my purposes.The cab portion will remain the same but the body will have to be opened up a bit as I find it too enclosed .I want the focus to be on the aircraft parts and pieces that the truck is carrying and not the truck itself.
    I have a set of more modern headlights left over from another project ,so I will convert the system to electric more in keeping with a T from early 20's.
  2. Millenniumfalsehood

    Millenniumfalsehood Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1,598
    Likes Received:
    94
    So is this going to be displayed in a museum or model show somewhere? I'd love to see this in person, and about the only excuse for seeing models is shows and museums.
  3. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  4. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    This is the plan for strapping things on to the van.The horiz stab and elevator will take up one side ,with the ailerons on the top rack and the rest inside. I don't plan to fabric cover any of this.I have had to stop building the T for now until I get the seated figs that you see here,which should be in a couple of weeks or so.These figs are already in a seated pose so I don"t anticipate too much modification.The uniforms can be altered to become street clothes or coveralls.The hats I will modify or change the heads altogether.I plan to improve my painting techniques(especially the faces) as these figs are outside and not subject to hangar lighting .They also are near the edge of the diorama and more subject to up-close observation by the viewer.
    This Camel /Ford truck piece will probably take a lot more time than I anticipated as it seems to grow in complexity day-by-day.The whole thing is just an add-on and not central to the storyline .It is more just a fun piece that I thought would add more interest to the back of the diorama . We don't often get to see airplanes being towed on our roads anymore!
  5. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Ash! I am planning to have all three dioramas on permanent display at the Canada Aviation Museum in Ottawa by next year sometime.They are being donated for educational purposes so kids can see how the old airplanes were put together!
  6. Fishcarver

    Fishcarver Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2004
    Messages:
    890
    Likes Received:
    1
    John:
    You are far and away the best contributor that this column has ever had!!

    Your model building skills are absolutely awesome!!

    Jim
  7. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    From van to flatbed!
    I don't know what I have been thinking but the van idea is really not a good one.A flat bed would be much better as it would allow me to rest the Camel's tail directly over the T's rear wheels. I could also leave the fin and rudder on the airplane which may look a lot better.It would also provide for a much more open concept to view the various parts and pieces.This would be an easy modification at this stage.The seated figures are on order at the hobby shop and when I get them they will be temporarily fitted to the seats of the T or one seated in the T and the other on the flatbed as an observer.Remember the driver is in the mens room taking a nervous one!
  8. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  9. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Jim for your kind comments! Cheers! John.
  10. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  11. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  12. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  13. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Opinions please!
    I am at a stage now with the Camel build where I have to finally decide whether to add the guns or not to the model.Up until now I was of the opinion that they would have been long removed from the aircraft but now I am having second thoughts.
    The story is that it is being transported by road to a university in southern Ontario where it will be used for study and research purposes.(this actually happened after the war).
    A asked a young friend of mine(13)what he thought and he said that it would be more attractive to the kids if I left them on. The Camel aircraft after all got its name from the hump created by the machine guns and they are a big part of its overall design.
    Something tells me that in all likelihood the guns would have been removed ,but then again I am doing this diorama for the kids and I want to please them first and foremost.What do you guys think on or off?
  14. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  15. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wow! at this level of magnification every flaw sure shows.The things you never see at 1/16th.
    The copper fittings were heated red hot with a butane lighter and then dunked in cold water to get the aged patina.Where the nails or screws go I just colored the holes black.With successive coats it will look better.
    The lower wing root area is another figment of the kit designers imagination,so I attempted to make it look a little better using some extra fittings I had left over from Jenny(in the end however I will somehow cover this area)I added some extra brace wire fittings for the internal wires.
    Some areas were weathered now while they are easily accessible .
    Next will be the rudder bar and the installation of the main fuel tank.

    Thanks to everyone who responded to my guns off or on question.Looks like 90% want them left on.My modeling bud,Stephen Lawson ,had a great idea.They could be fakes that were used in the air shows and movies of the era.I will have to research this angle and see if any Camels were used in this way in Canada .This would fit perfectly into my story line as a former movie prop airplane being donated to a university or museum.Movies were very important to this era as a means of promoting aviation to the general public. If anyone has any info on this please let me know.
  16. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  17. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  18. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
  19. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    In building the Camel I get a real sense of a fighter pilot's aircraft .It has the same mystic that the Spitfire had in WW2.Everything about this airplane says "top of the food chain", the Peregrine Falcon of the fighter aircraft world of its day.I can only imagine the feeling that a pilot would get sitting in this cockpit.Joy,fear,excitement,a feeling of pilot and machine as one.It must have been a wonderful feeling to master an aircraft such as this.A very real challenge just to fly let alone fight in.Once you were in you were in till the end whatever the outcome.No escape from this cockpit.You either walk away or you buy the farm,period.Modern day gladiators for sure!
    It must have seemed very strange to return from battle every night ,sitting in the officers mess sipping your brandy and wondering if tomorrow would be your turn to die! Unlike the foot soldier who lived in constant fear of sudden death in the trenches, the fighter pilot was in a kind of strange world of destruction by day and mock joy of survival at night.Still knowing that tomorrow the cycle would begin all over again.It must have taken nerves of steel to climb into that cockpit every day,day after day and try to be brave until the very end.
    __________________
    It has been said that the difference between a "pilot" and an "aviator" is that a pilot is a technician,and an aviator is an artist in love with flight.
    JohnReid (Aviator)
  20. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2005
    Messages:
    1,219
    Likes Received:
    0
    The machine guns!
    the machine guns are an excellent example of fake guns and are a great depiction of how a carpenter might build a fake gun and then paint it gunmetal!
    The fact that they are fakes and look it doesn't bother me at all ,in fact guns are not one of my favorite things anyway and not really something that I would want to promote to kids.Maybe I should paint them red!