"How to Build Large Scale Dioramas"

Discussion in 'Dioramas & Displays' started by JohnReid, Jul 7, 2007.

  1. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  2. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  3. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

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    If not there, then how about, on the inside of the office?
    That's a nice looking picture. I didn't even notice the cut and paste job on the Curtiss logo until you said something about it!

    What is that last picture of with the square metal pan?
    Is that an oil pan with newspaper in it?

    Russell
  4. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  5. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

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    Yup, I thought so.
    I can really tell now that there are some drips in there!

    Russell
  6. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    Drip pan.
    The drip pan is made from brass sheet bent up at the edges with a pair of small pliers.It is made to look rough and home made,nothing fancy here.It was weathered using very thin Jo Sonja Raw Umber .The newspaper was sprayed with lacquer after it was shaped to give it a little more volume.The drips were applied with the tip of a toothpick, using the same thin raw umber, to get that soaked in look.
  7. Millenniumfalsehood

    Millenniumfalsehood Active Member

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    joh, I haven't commented on this so far because I am absolutely blown away! Do you mind if I use some of the pictures to illustrate a paper I'm writing on model building techniques?
  8. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  9. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    Not at all,be my guest! Good luck with the paper.Cheers! John.
  10. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    Where are we now?
    Working my way along the R/H side wall towards the front of the hangar.Next it will be on to the L/H wall ,which is almost already covered by the wings and their stands,so there really is not that much left to do.
    Then it is back to fastening down the rest of the items to the hangar floor and putting on the roof rafter assembly.
    As of right now I think that I am on track for a Spring of 08 finish.My plan is to build the Ford van/Camel aircraft trailer this Winter and install it on the R/H rear landscape module as the final installation.I may also add a few more figures outdoors.
    Ultimately my goal is to do all my own figures for my next diorama, "The Backyard Flyer".As a wood carver I have always admired the figure carvers especially those who work in the small scales.
  11. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    I have a small favor to ask - would you please include one small mistake so that I know you are human? :D

    Really, this is a blast to follow!
    Thanks
    Chris
  12. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  13. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  14. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    Chris,there are plenty ! But the best piece of advice I ever got about modeling was to treat every thing that you do with the same respect,whether it is something you like to do or not.Ex:say you like to do cockpits but hate doing engines ,well you must put the same effort into both,like it or not!
    Cheers! John.
  15. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  16. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    Adding more junk!
  17. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    John
    I thought you might find these quotes inspirational,

    " The Jenny was a temperamental machine to master. She had a tendency to veer left on take-off. Her engine produced a mere 90 horsepower. She had a maximum horizontal flying speed of only 75mph and engine failure was not uncommon.
    My first experience in flying was done in a Jenny, it was said,"If you can fly a Jenny, you can fly anything"

    Lt. Bill Purvis, RAF pilot WW1

    A photograph of a "Jenny" was prominently displayed in the foyer of the Purvis home in Rosedale, Toronto


    "The harsh gray Canadian winter provided many obstacles for airmen training in Canada for the war overseas
    One problem was simply the fragility of early aircraft, The "Jenny" in particular, would struggle through snow in an attempt to get airborne. Wheel undercarriages proved ineffective in snowdrifts more than six inches deep.
    The solution to this problem was to emulate an aboriginal principle, adopting a method used by the North American Indian since he first traversed the frozen wastes of Canada
    Thus was evolved the present day airplane skid."

    John Gordon, historian

    Approximately 6000" Jenny's" were ultimately produced during the war years
    After the Great War, large numbers of Jenny's were sold off at surplus prices; 600 dollars included shipping crates. Many young pilots, trained for war, now found themselves unemployed. If a pilot could procure a "Jenny", one employment option was to travel the country and offer rides, often landing in a farmer's field to set up shop. The pilot also needed to possess the mechanical skills to keep the machine airborne. These flying entrepreneurs became known as"barnstormers".
    Other pilots formed traveling groups, "flying circuses", performing formation aerobatics and flying stunts to the awe and amazement of the crowds, usually in the rural areas of North America.
    One of the most dangerous stunts was wing walking, with a "daredevil "literally walking on the wings of the sturdy "Jenny " while flying, and often performed by young woman
    In the United States.The Air Commerce Act of 1926 placed licensing of pilots and aircraft under federal control and regulated the operation of aircraft, putting an end to the "Barnstormer" in America.

    Cheers,
    Fitzee
  18. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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    [​IMG]
    Almost finished!
  19. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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  20. JohnReid

    JohnReid Active Member

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