Home made trees...

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by J. Steffen, Jan 8, 2008.

  1. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    The pics are bad so be gentle and tell me what you think.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  2. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Nicely done...! They look like twisted wire armatures - how about a little bit about how you made them?

    :thumb:

    Andrew
  3. Santa Fe Jack

    Santa Fe Jack Member

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    My honest opinion is that they are unrealistically uniformly orange. When trees turn color, they go in stages, usually starting at the top or extremities. I'd suggest doing them mostly in green, then adding a bit of orange on the edges for a more realistic look.
  4. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    $4.00 worth of 26 guage floral Wire, floral tape, and industrial strength scouring pads (stiff pads used on grills). Picked it all up at Walmart. A bag of medium turf or flocking. I got a big bag of the fall colors for $4.00.

    I cut at least six strands of the floral wire in equal length and used my safety wire pliers to twist them. I splayed the ends out in different directions and sprayed them with adhesive. I stuck cut up scouring pad on the spurs. The pads naturally want to cling together. I try to get them to look... tree shaped.

    I wrap the trunk in floral wrap, spray the pads with green or brown paint, (depending on the foliage color). before the paint dries, I dump the foliage on it and while its drying, spray the trunk brown.

    I figure with the amont that I can make, they're costing me about .10 cents a piece to make, and take about five minutes.
  5. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    This is why I ask. I just wanted to see If I could do it first. Eventally I will get it down to a science.
  6. puddlejumper

    puddlejumper Member

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    Those look great! :thumb: While it is true that trees turn orange in the fall gradually you will see that there are plenty of unrealistically uniformly orange colored trees out there. I would definitely use those. Also I have a maple tree in my yard that is that color almost all year around.

    Thanks for the pics and tips!

    Dave
  7. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    Here are a couple more. I know they need a little more flocking but right now, I'm just experimenting.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  8. puddlejumper

    puddlejumper Member

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    Very nice! I especially like the first one, not sure why but it's my favorite!

    :thumb:

    Dave
  9. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    I think I'm getting the knack. Using more wire. Five doubled strands give ten separate branches. More to work with.
  10. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    I would not add any more foam to them. Most trees are somewhat see-through, or at least have spots where they are less dense. I think they are fine as is. I like the cut out in the top corner too - looks like the hydro electric company has been by, trimming them away from the wires...!

    Andrew
  11. coachC

    coachC Member

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    That is a good point but after the trees have turned they can be uniformly orange.


    http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_th...oto_984876_autumn_orange_foliage_blue_sky.jpg
  12. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    They look good. I thionk it would be worthwhile to look up trees on google to see pictures of various types of trees that are nativce to the area you are modeling, or if you know what trees are native look them up by name. The reason I say this is some trees tend to grow very uniformly. The first tree that comes to mind when thinking uniformly woould be pines, but oak trees also show a level of uniformity. On the other hand, and elm tree has branches going every which way. By studying the various types of trees you can model trees as accurately as you would a locomotive!
  13. coachC

    coachC Member

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    Russ makes a good point. Searching for your the type of tree in your layout's location is a good idea also. For example, he was talking about Pine trees being uniform. In his area they are, but here in the South they could be like the Elm tree with branches growing in all diffrent directions.
  14. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    Actually, I decided I'm just going to have fun. I can spend years like a chinese artist trying to paint the perfect rooster, but what fun would be in that?
  15. puddlejumper

    puddlejumper Member

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    :thumb: Having fun is what it is all about anyway, right? Besides, I thought your trees were great!

    You know, I have a better idea, I think you SHOULD keep trying to make the perfect tree like a chinese artist trying to paint the perfect rooster. Perfection is VERY important. You can send all your failures to my address and I will dispose of them on my layout! :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

    Dave
  16. J. Steffen

    J. Steffen Member

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    :mrgreen:

    I wish I COULD mass produce them.