Glossy Paper

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by silverw, Sep 29, 2006.

  1. silverw

    silverw Member

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    I'm wondering if anyone has any good tips for building models using glossy photo paper. What glue do you use? I've tried a couple times, but can get satisfactory results using white glue. Maybe there are different kinds of paper, without the sort of plastic backing on the types that I have tried.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    ....Bill
  2. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    the trick I think is that you have to scrape/sand the gloss of the glue tabs (and possibly off the back) where you intend to glue - I avoid glossy just for that reason.
    Chris
  3. hpept

    hpept Member

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    i tried Epson glossy photo cardstock and more recently HP photopaper but i didn't have satisfactory results for various reasons:
    1) There's no way to keep it glued with plain white glue (i used cyanocrylate with some success but gluing a whole model with CA is not for me, with the problem that CA is a very fragile glue and a lot of touching of the model can cause ruptures of glued parts)
    2) scoring causes bruises in the ink layer and bending will cause paper to crack leaving a white mark
    3) folding doesn't come out right, as paper is very elastic and a 90° bend will never stay 90°
    4) i don't like the sensation of touching it, as it seems covered with fine powder and this disturbs me :cry:

    Conclusion: i gave up. I build my models on 160 gsm matte cardstock, and if i need a shine, simply spray it with acrylic lacquer (Acrilex, most famous here in Brasil)
  4. silverw

    silverw Member

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    Thanks guys...

    That has been my experience, also. I had a request to build a model using glossy and I just thought that maybe someone had made a useful discovery!

    ...thanks again ..... Bill
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Don't Use Glossy Photo Paper for CardModeling

    Hi Bill,

    Same experience as others with photo paper. It seems to delaminate easily when bent, folded or otherwise mutilated. Put photos on it but don't use it for modeling. Several coats of Krylon Crystal Clear will yield a glossy surface equal to a glossy photo paper. If you're after highly saturated prints using inkjet printing I suggest using matte photo paper followed by bonding it to regular card stock with 3M #77 spray contact cement. It will still need a coat of gloss or matte spray to seal the surface but the colors will be outstanding. I'm still looking for an inkjet coated cardstock that's suitalbe for building card models but haven't found any yet...,

    -Gil
  6. dhanners

    dhanners Member

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    There are glossy papers that aren't necessarily photo papers. My local copy shop carries a paper that is slick and glossy on both sides; I think they use it for printing brochures.

    It feels like it is somewhere between 60- or 80-pound weight, and so far, it cuts, folds, rolls and glues like "normal" paper. Care must be taken when rolling it, though, as any wrinkles or dents really show and are virtually impossible to smooth out.

    When I build, I use a pH-neutral PVA glue that I buy at my local art supply store, and it glues the paper just fine. (PVA is basically a purer form of Elmer's.)

    I'm currently building one of Erik te Groen's Delta II rockets and I'm using the paper for the glossy sections of the launch vehicle, mainly the rocket's core. But after printing out the sheets, I found out that the Delta II bodies are painted with a semi-gloss paint, so I taped my printed-out sheets to some cardboard and sprayed them with some Testor's semi-gloss overspray from a rattle can. Worked just fine.
  7. dhanners

    dhanners Member

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    There are glossy papers that aren't necessarily photo papers. My local copy shop carries a paper that is slick and glossy on both sides; I think they use it for printing brochures.

    It feels like it is somewhere between 60- or 80-pound weight, and so far, it cuts, folds, rolls and glues like "normal" paper. Care must be taken when rolling it, though, as any wrinkles or dents really show and are virtually impossible to smooth out.

    When I build, I use a pH-neutral PVA glue that I buy at my local art supply store, and it glues the paper just fine. (PVA is basically a purer form of Elmer's.)

    I'm currently building one of Erik te Groen's Delta II rockets and I'm using the paper for the glossy sections of the launch vehicle, mainly the rocket's core. But after printing out the sheets, I found out that the Delta II bodies are painted with a semi-gloss paint, so I taped my printed-out sheets to some cardboard and sprayed them with some Testor's semi-gloss overspray from a rattle can. Worked just fine.
  8. RINGMASTER

    RINGMASTER Member

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    Has anyone had experience with HP Brosure and Flyer Paper?
  9. RINGMASTER

    RINGMASTER Member

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    Has anyone had experience with HP Brosure and Flyer Paper?
  10. Dnlgtr

    Dnlgtr Member

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    I have 3 different brands of Gloss paper.
    Kodak soft gloss 44#(165g/m) 6 mil.
    Special Moments 10 mil 68#(260g/m) 1 pack gloss, 1 pack High gloss.
    & NCR Glossy 7 mil 70#(195g/m)

    The NCR has yielded the best models,Though I have only built 2 that I printed, And 1 of those has since faded.
    I would like to add more support inside the second model I built even though it says that it is 70#. It is still somewhat flimsy. Even on a Small camper trailer.
    This paper says it is "perfect for everyday printing"
    Now i just have to get lucky and find this paper again.( I bought it at a Buyout chain[Big Lots])

    The High gloss from Special Moments left a textured surface. I have only printed 1 model on this, K.I.T.T., and I don't know if I want to build it due to the surface effect. It feels like 400 or even 320 grit sandpaper
    I haven't opened the regular gloss from this brand or the Kodak.
    And I doubt with what happened with the High Gloss, I will even use the regular.
    The Kodak I am not sure about.
  11. Dnlgtr

    Dnlgtr Member

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    I have 3 different brands of Gloss paper.
    Kodak soft gloss 44#(165g/m) 6 mil.
    Special Moments 10 mil 68#(260g/m) 1 pack gloss, 1 pack High gloss.
    & NCR Glossy 7 mil 70#(195g/m)

    The NCR has yielded the best models,Though I have only built 2 that I printed, And 1 of those has since faded.
    I would like to add more support inside the second model I built even though it says that it is 70#. It is still somewhat flimsy. Even on a Small camper trailer.
    This paper says it is "perfect for everyday printing"
    Now i just have to get lucky and find this paper again.( I bought it at a Buyout chain[Big Lots])

    The High gloss from Special Moments left a textured surface. I have only printed 1 model on this, K.I.T.T., and I don't know if I want to build it due to the surface effect. It feels like 400 or even 320 grit sandpaper
    I haven't opened the regular gloss from this brand or the Kodak.
    And I doubt with what happened with the High Gloss, I will even use the regular.
    The Kodak I am not sure about.
  12. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Fly paper? Now there's an interesting concept.....

    Tim (wunwinglow)
  13. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

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    Fly paper? Now there's an interesting concept.....

    Tim (wunwinglow)
  14. jparenti

    jparenti Member

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    I gave up on glossy paper, because I do a lot of rocket models and you cannot keep the glossy paper glued well, so the tubes fall apart. When I want shiny parts (the inked parts, anyways) I go to Staples and have them print the model for me. Their laser printers leave a nice glossy finish to the ink, which is appealing for, say, car models or even some rocket parts. It doesn't help white areas, but acrylic spray does the trick.
    Also, the ink doesn't rub off. I know I am not alone with this one being important. My fingers are permanently stained with inkjet ruboff. :grin:
  15. jparenti

    jparenti Member

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    I gave up on glossy paper, because I do a lot of rocket models and you cannot keep the glossy paper glued well, so the tubes fall apart. When I want shiny parts (the inked parts, anyways) I go to Staples and have them print the model for me. Their laser printers leave a nice glossy finish to the ink, which is appealing for, say, car models or even some rocket parts. It doesn't help white areas, but acrylic spray does the trick.
    Also, the ink doesn't rub off. I know I am not alone with this one being important. My fingers are permanently stained with inkjet ruboff. :grin:
  16. bugman72

    bugman72 Member

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    How do you guys who build cars go about spraying your model with gloss? Do you build the vehicle and then apply the gloss afterwards? And if so, how do you keep the items that you don't want glossy protected, especially when some of those item may be an important part of the body's build? Or, do you apply the gloss to the parts prior to the build? Do you cut the parts out and then pin them to a surface for glossing, or do you do the entire sheet?

    I had tried in the past to use gloss photo paper for body panels and have encountered the same issues as others. Either you can't get a good fold or curve or, when using a laser printer, the ink flakes off and the printed image is glossy in the background but has a matte sheen where the printed parts are.
  17. bugman72

    bugman72 Member

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    How do you guys who build cars go about spraying your model with gloss? Do you build the vehicle and then apply the gloss afterwards? And if so, how do you keep the items that you don't want glossy protected, especially when some of those item may be an important part of the body's build? Or, do you apply the gloss to the parts prior to the build? Do you cut the parts out and then pin them to a surface for glossing, or do you do the entire sheet?

    I had tried in the past to use gloss photo paper for body panels and have encountered the same issues as others. Either you can't get a good fold or curve or, when using a laser printer, the ink flakes off and the printed image is glossy in the background but has a matte sheen where the printed parts are.
  18. blueeyedbear

    blueeyedbear Member

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    I have not tried either of these on card models, but I used both methods when I was building 1/72 scale plastic aircraft:

    1. Seal the model with Testors Dull coat (spray on several light coats), let dry over night, then spray the gloss coat on the entire model, using several light coats. Then, using an appropriate size of good paint brush (Soft, pointed water color brushes are best. Clean them carefully after use), coat the areas to be non-glossy with Dull Coat (Dull Coat and Gloss Coat come in both spray cans and bottles --- see your local hobby shop).

    2. As above, seal the model and let dry. Use a low-tack masking tape (hobby shop or art supply store), mask the non-glossy areas. Spray with gloss coat, as above. Carefully remove the masking tape.

    Either way (or any other way!) EXPERIMENT first. The coatings may dissolve the ink on the paper, for truly disastrous results. The masking tape may be too tacky and may lift the surface from the paper when the tape is removed (with plastic models, this calls for stripping and repainting the whole model --- reprinting is LOTS easier!). The tape may not seal tightly, leaking the coating at the edges.

    You might find an airbrush better than a spray can --- easier to get a light "mist" coat with than the spray can.

    [If you didn't think of it, either method could be used to "shine-up" the canopy, lights and other shiny places.]

    Notice that I did not say either of these was really easy, but both methods are easier than they sound, once you get the hang of it!:grin:

    Bob