G goose #2

Discussion in 'G / O / S Scale Model Trains' started by Bill Nelson, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    In the thirties, under receivership , the Rio Grande Southern's largest revenue source was thier mail contract, but the were not making any money by the time they paid for a locomotive crew and fuel, so they experimented with building their own motorcars from Peirce Arrow limousines, and various junkyard parts. the Geese keept the Rr in business from the 30 to the early 60's.



    This is a project I started fifteen to twenty years to make a gift for my Dad. I wanted to make a goose for him. I started work from a postcard and some photos of goose #2, as I couldn't find scale drawings.

    this project was re inspired by Dr Tom's efforts ( the little River RR in Dr. Tom's back yard- over in the logging mining and industrial section). and will run there soon hopefully.


    For the auto body I got a kit for a Buggatti limo, made by Italiari. I had to cut down the hood, make a new radiator, and do a lot of kitbashing to the body, but I was happy with everything but an annoying splice line where the back wheel hole was filled in. Then I got a book on the geese, which showed that the original had that same splice line in almost exactly the same place. The book also had a scale drawing, and overall I had less than 6 inches of error.

    I used two NWSL magic carpets to power the unit, built a brass frame cow catcher, and snow plow. I was on a roll, and then my Dad called me and told me he had torn up his outdoor RR and was building inside for his #1 gauge tinplate collection. the Patrly finished goose went into a box for many long years, but it is out now!


    Studying the drive I found that one of the gears was damaged on one of the NWSL magic carpet drives. I cut up that drive, and removed the motor ( which went in to my Ho RR's #1 ). I was going to get another magic carpet drive, but was concerned that a current model might not run well with a 18 year old unit. at micromasrk you can get miniature chain and sprokets, the prototuype goose had the first axle powered fron the driveshaft through the differential, and powered the second axle off of the first via a chain drive, so that is what I'm going to do on this one.

    I have unhooked the wire leads to the wheels in anticipating using battery power, and will be hauling the whole thing to the RC hobby shop soon to study RC possibilities.

    unfortunately I only lettered one side, I have the dry transfers to do the other side, but some times they don't work well when they get old (just like me). If I can't match the dry transfers the whole shebang will get repainted from RGS to State line RR.

    what fun!

    Bill Nelson

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  2. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    I got the goose drive set up with some miniature chain and sprockets to power the back axle off of the front one like the prototype. The first time I had it set up I had a feedback problems with the chain. the prototype didn't have that problem, as the took out the spider gears in the rear axle's differential so the right t and left rear axle were not connected directly to each other mechanically. I modified one of the sprockets on the rear axle to freewheel, so the chain turns on that side, but the whole axle is powered from the other side, and there is no feedback bind.

    Next I can start putting it together and start shopping for RC stuff.

    Bill

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  3. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    more goose parts

    I have doug up some of the scratchbuilt brass parts for this critter, and I found a bad photograph of the prototype, that I own the copyright to, and can safely post,


    the goose is assembled the wire leads are for testing the power truck, which will get RC some day. shown for reference is a HOn3 3 truck goose.


    Bill Nelson

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  4. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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  5. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Neat Thread!

    Hi Bill,

    I didn't know this thread was out there. Very interesting. I like the vid of the chain and the sprocket drive.......works and looks good.

    I will be following along to see what r/c battery combo you work out.

    Doc Tom:thumb:
  6. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    The goose has been painted green , for my private 3 foot road had it's cowcatcher and snowplow soldered on and painted, now it is ready for lettering for the state line railroad.


    Now I need to start shopping for a radio and battery for it to get it ready to roll

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  7. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Looking Good

    The model looks great. Looking forward to seeing it polish the rails of the LRRR.

    Tom and the crew.

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  8. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    That truck/train, is absolutely amazing!! The chain drive on the outside would facilitate east maintenance. Really cool, almost post apocalyptic, it's something that one might expect to see in a "Road Warrior" genre movie. :)
  9. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    The first axle was powered by a standard automotive rear end, of the drive shaft in the traditional manner, so the problem the guys in the shop had was how to power the second axle. thier junkyard solution was to mout sprockets on the wheels, remove the spider gears from the second differential, and run chains from the forward wheels to the rear wheels to power them.

    All the models of geese I have seen have dummy chains. Mine is the only one I have seen with working chains.


    I have some yellow dry transfers, so I can start lettering it for the State line Railroad. The other G scale equipment I have that is lettered is lettered for the Harlow Cove Coal and Lumber Co. A goose looks to me to be something that better suits a real railroad (although a chintzy one), so I'm lettering it for the State Line Railroad, whose main operations are in HON3, mainly because I really like the look of my HOn3 goose kitbash progect, a 3 truck Pierce arrow bodied goose (in later life some of the pierce arrow bodies got so broke down they were rebuilt with Wayne buss bodies, still very strange animals, but not as appealing to my eye.


    Soon I will be shopping for a 6 or 8 channel radio control system to control this project and a Bachman Ten wheeler, and two model boats I have been working on for years and years.
  10. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Well, you nailed this one. Being a machinist, I can admire the work you put into this. It's awesome! :)
  11. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Lettering the Goose.

    I got some Woodlands Scenics dry transfers and started to letter the goose. The last couple times I have used them I have had old ones that had degraded some, and it was a joy working with the new ones.


    Once upon a time I had my old ones stored in my RR room, which is in the attic of a metal roofed structure. my RR room geets ho, I need to store my dry transfers in my downstairs work area, or my garage, where they won't be exposed to the heat, which after a while will make them want to stick to the backing sheet, instead of transferring to the model.


    I have the letters and numbers done on the cab section, and the U S MAIL EXPRESS on the front ends of the freight body sides. I still have to do a STATELINE RAILROAD MOTOR #2 on the rear end of the freight body sides, and a 2 on the rear extension, that was added on to hold a stove to keep the mail from freezing.

    the second photo shows the details on the back side of the scratchbuilt brass cow catcher and snowplow. these are some of the best brass scratchbuilding I have done. in the first photo the wrinkles in the thin styrene that had the nail heads embossed in them, and then were bonded on the thicker structural shell. The wrinkles were not intentional, but the prototype had wrinkles, so they are welcome details.



    Soon I will have the lettering done I need to paint the front truck (the red wheels really have to go) and I need to get the structural parts of the power truck painted so they don't stand out like a sore thumb. Then when I get brave enough, I have to start ordering radio equipment, and hope I don't **** up too badly as I have the goose, a bachman G scale 10 wheeler, and two model boats, a Roman Bireme, and a 1860's side wheel ocean going steamer I want to put receivers In, I need to get the right transmitter.


    Bill Nelson

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  12. Rhaven Blaack

    Rhaven Blaack ADMINISTRATOR Administrator

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    Years ago, I use to belong to a model RR club, and saw some of the most inteesting things there, but I haev to say that this is the most interesting thing that I have seen on the rail thus far.
    It looks really good. I like what you did with the drive system and the video that shows it working.
    Keep up the good work.
  13. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Occasionally I start a project and the first steps end up with a quality way above what I was aiming at. When that happens I generally attempt to match or exceed that level of quality on the later steps, and the project becomes an exercise in pushing the envelope on materials and techniques ; once I get in that mode, if I scratch build a part, and I'm not happy with it I will make another, If I need one part, and I'm satisfied with it, I'll make a second, and use the one that looks best. If I need eight parts I'll make ten or twelve, and choose the best, and the whole project goes off the deep end. this is one such project.

    the same thing happened on my Ho Surry parker log loader project , in which every step is documented in the logging mining and industrial railroad section in the your unique logging equipment thread. also in my logging in eastern TN on the DGCC&WRR in 1928 also in the logging mining and industrial section toward the current end of the thread (say page 50 or so), I have a still ongoing project on the Crooked Creek engine shops, another project where I have gone bonkers. that project is held up untill I get crazed enough to sit down and scratchbuild another 18 working engine house door hinges in Ho scale, so I can hang the doors on the southern side of the engine house.

    another project that got pretty wild is the building of St. Steven's church in Harlow Tn. that is documented in the scratching and bashing section, and the thread is entitled Bashing a church.


    projects that inspire you to push the limits and do better work are the only things that can make you a better modeler. folks can show you cool methods, but till you bush yourself to make each step better, you won't be improving your skills fast.


    Bill Nelson


    a similar
  14. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Occasionally I start a project and the first steps end up with a quality way above what I was aiming at. When that happens I generally attempt to match or exceed that level of quality on the later steps, and the project becomes an exercise in pushing the envelope on materials and techniques ; once I get in that mode, if I scratch build a part, and I'm not happy with it I will make another, If I need one part, and I'm satisfied with it, I'll make a second, and use the one that looks best. If I need eight parts I'll make ten or twelve, and choose the best, and the whole project goes off the deep end. this is one such project.

    the same thing happened on my Ho Surry parker log loader project , in which every step is documented in the logging mining and industrial railroad section in the your unique logging equipment thread. also in my logging in eastern TN on the DGCC&WRR in 1928 also in the logging mining and industrial section toward the current end of the thread (say page 50 or so), I have a still ongoing project on the Crooked Creek engine shops, another project where I have gone bonkers. that project is held up untill I get crazed enough to sit down and scratchbuild another 18 working engine house door hinges in Ho scale, so I can hang the doors on the southern side of the engine house.

    another project that got pretty wild is the building of St. Steven's church in Harlow Tn. that is documented in the scratching and bashing section, and the thread is entitled Bashing a church.


    projects that inspire you to push the limits and do better work are the only things that can make you a better modeler. folks can show you cool methods, but till you bush yourself to make each step better, you won't be improving your skills fast.


    Bill Nelson
  15. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    I was hunting for something in the garage, and found a box with some stuff from my Dad's old RR. Most of it was junk, but there was a 2 channel radio in there. I had one 2 channel radio, but hadn't been tempted to use it as it had a lot of corrosion in the battery area of the transmitter.


    I had a radio car Dad had set up the throttle control uses a different style of plug for the receiver, so I need to splice on a different plug . I have tested the radio and it works, so when I get a compatible plug spiced on. I can start putting this stuff in the goose.


    I have all the pieces except for the battery power for the motor in hand , so I can start to mount these peices, and look for a battery. I also need to look for another receiver on the same frequency, as I could use that , hooked up to another channel to run a throttle control for my Bachman G scale 10 wheeler, and run it and the goose off the same transmitter. I have a RPO car and a combine, so if I could get all that stuff rolling at once I could move a lot of mail in Tom's back yard

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  16. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Moving Mail and batteries

    Great find. I am glad it still works. Looks like your dad was one of the pioneers in RC/Battery power for Large Scale trains.

    My boys definitely need help moving the mail. Not much will fit in the Little River Motor Car #1.

    In the pictures below you might be able to see the Radio Shack battery holder with 8 1.2 volt rechargeable AA batteries. It provides 9.6 volts of juice which has worked well. This was a pretty cheap set up, under $50 including the battery charger.

    Unfortunately I will miss RR club tomorrow because of a Church Haiti meeting.

    Tom

    Tom

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  17. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Tom, I have seen battery holder like that in fact that is what powers the goose's receiver. It would be as simple as pie to add another to power the motor.


    I have the goose all apart to work on gear placement Once I know where everything goes, I will need to drill and cut some holes in the frame for the transmitter's on off switch, and the motor power on and off switch. after that gets done, then I will add some more paint to the frame. I'm thinking the frame might get just a touch of red auto body primer misted in for that slightly rusty look. I think that would look good, especially at the base of the snowplow.


    while I had the goose out I did some hand painting n the power truck. using some black paint to cover some brass and some balsa wood that stood out. I also painted the sides of the drive wheels black, as all that shiny nickel silver stood out too much. I didn't have power hooked up to the wheel, so I couldn't roll the wheel, so the paint job is a little uneven, but I can come in later and touch it up easily.


    also today I protected what letting I have done with some dull coat. the Dull coat fogged up the windows of the cab, but I was able to use some rubbing alcohol on a Q tip to remove the dullcoat off the "Glass". The dull coat helped the look of the Krylon Hunter green. I will have to get another can, so I can disassemble the Delton Combine and RPO car someday, and cover up the Colorado Southern paint scheme in favor of a STATE LINE approved paint scheme.

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  18. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Nice job Bill. you are coming along nicely with this project.

    I had the same thing happen with dull coat on clear pieces when I forgot to mask. I too used rubbing alcohol to get the clear pieces clear again.

    Another 3 feet added to the LRRR line last month. Looking forward to seeing your new RC/battery creations strutting their stuff perhaps this summer.

    Tom
  19. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    I'm very close to having all needed on hand to get goose #2 operational. right now I'm just looking for plugs so I can disconnect the throttle control for the power truck and whatever battery I use; Dad had some plugs, but they are big hulking things. some of my plugs I have for ho would work, they look puny, but I will probably be running on 6 or 9 volts (it will likely be a slow goose.) so If I don't have it rolling in less than a month, I will be surprised . It is certainly closer to ready than any of my other RC projects, My Roman Bireme needs to have a lot of structral wood removed from inside the hull to get the hull lighter, and then it needs to have a new lighter rowing mechanism designed and built. It took me a year to build the last oar mechanism, and get the bugs worked out. My paddlewheel steamer's hull is done, but I need to scratchbuild some paddlewheels, make some sails, and figure out how to control them. Lots of folks sail R/C boats, but they are mostly into racing, and they don't share their secrets on the internet, hoping to maintain any advantage they might have from the way they have solved any particular puzzle
  20. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    More good news!!

    Tom