Fokker EIII from modele-kartonowe.com

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by Ron, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. Gregory

    Gregory New Member

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    Hi folks. :roll:

    I'm new here, so let me say 'hello' to everybody ;)

    I am giving a little help to Lech, author of Fokker E-III. Lech is surprised that there are some difficulties with this very simple model. AFAIK, everything 'should' fit ...

    Nevertheless, Fokker EIII is just being built to ensure that we did not make any horrible mistake. Pictures should be ready by tomorrow.

    regards,
    Gregory
  2. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi Gregory,

    Posting some photos showing build progress on the Fokker EIII. The cowl has been rough sanded and will undergo sealing, filling, sanding and painting. Note the shallow angle on the fuselage sides between front metal work and rear of cockpit. The sides need to to step down on the sides of the cockpit to fit properly. I had to sand down both sides all the way to the tail to make the sides fit properly.

    Best regards, Gil

    P.S. It's tough emulating Raimund's photography.

    [​IMG]
  3. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    Assembled nose cowl and sanded. First image shows cowl with acrylic filler drying. Second photo is of cowl test fit on fuselage after application of primer. Final sanding and application of aluminium finish scheduled for tomorrow.

    Best regards, Gil

    [​IMG]
  4. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    Finally tackled the landing gear. Decided to use bamboo in place of paper due to ease of construction and long term strength of the model. The original had balsa strips doped onto the tubular steel struts which were recreated here. Wheels were made using the same method as the sites article explains. They're being trial fitted as is the cowl. I've decided to paint the model to a different aircraft using various airbrush techniques.

    Best regards, Gil

    [​IMG]
  5. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    The EIIIs fuselage is out of the paint shop with the first primer coat after filling with acrylic modeling paste special compound and sanding. One last filling and fine sanding before the last primer coat tomorrow. Panel lines will be scribed after that coat is thoroughly dry. Looking at developing a LMG 08 that will withstand a high resolution closeup. Engine will also receive special attention detailing. Wings and tail group remain to be done followed by full assembly and rigging.

    Best regards, Gil

    [​IMG]
  6. Ron

    Ron Member

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    Gregory, welcome to Cardmodels :) The mistakes presented could just be me. Have you guys had any success in figuring out what was done?

    Gil, once again you've taken things one or two steps further than I dreamed possible with paper. The cowling looks magnificent! I can't wait to see the rest of the model and your take on rigging

    All the best

    Ron
  7. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    Been busy doing Oberursel U1 engine work posted elsewhere on this site. The engine and cowl are very important modeling wise on WWI aircraft as these two structures first attract the eye and therefore need to be given a good deal of attention as compared to the rest of the model in order to achieve a high level of appreciation and further invite the viewer to inspect the work. Proportions from photographs of the Oberursel 100 HP engine were lifted today and will be used to develop a 3-view drawing, the basis for the paper model construct design.

    As for the fuselage, I plan to do the final filling, sanding and last primer coat tomorrow amongst other things.

    Spun off on a wheel cover tangent in CAD (no pun intended). Learned a lot about spoking patterns before looking at photos of the original and realized that Fokker used spun aluminium wheel covers. Oh well, the research will be applied to French Nieuports in the future. I plan to experiment with dapping blocks to obtain the wheel cover shape using circular motions of a clay modeling spoon to deform the paper into a dished shape (dapping blocks are steel cubes with various diameter hemispheres removed from the faces. Used by jewelers in metal forming tasks. One other point is that the spoke covers are a tad too small as supplied they need to be 0.548 inches in diameter to fit snuggly with the inner tire rim. Those will be printed cut, formed and trial fitted tomorrow. Pictures if it works, words if it doesn't.

    Best regards, Gil
  8. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi All,

    It's pictures! The wheel covers were successfully formed using the spoon modeling tool and the steel dapping block. The discs did, at first, crinkle around the outside but this was pressed out by the tool using additional force. A circular motion of the tool starting from the center and spiraling outward works best (paper is 67# stock). The discs were cutout using the Olfa circle cutter. The center axle clearence hole was punched out using a 4 mm die on the leather punch tool. This is a great method for tank and submarine hatches and with a little work it could make great looking racing tires.

    Best regards, Gil

    [​IMG]
  9. Bernhard

    Bernhard Member

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    Hi Gil

    What's the "acrylic filler" you used before sanding the engine cowl into shape? Is it the stuff coming in tubes to add body to artist's acrylic paints or something else?
    Is this stuff sufficient to harden the card for sanding or did you soak the parts with CA or the likes?

    Bernhard
  10. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hi Bernhard,

    It's official name is "acrylic modeling paste" and "hard acrylic modeling paste". One is simply harder when it dries than the other. You can add spackling powder or micro balloons to further thicken and improve the sandability and in the case of the micro ballons lighten the paste also. You can find this in the paint section of any artists supply, and yes, it is used to thicken paints to the effect of adding visible relief to the piece and as an adhesive for papier mache.

    CA was used to assemble the pieces but other than that was not used consciously to harden the paper. The acrylic paste will "harden" the paper somewhat but I'd prefer to call it "toughen" the paper. I usually apply a coat of acrylic sealer to the paper before forming to "seal" the surface. This has no real effect on the structural quality of the paper. In this case, where additional stiffness and water resistance is required, I applied several coats of lacquer before applying the acrylic paste. A nice quality of the acrylic paste is that it can be applied on a flat surface, let dry, and then folded or formed into shape without cracking or splitting. One use is to make corugated paper to cover the likes of a JU-52 or metal roofing material etc.

    Best regards, Gil
  11. charliec

    charliec Active Member

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    Sounds like the perfect material to model the Zimmerit coating on German tanks.

    Sigh - so many ideas - so little time.

    Regards,

    Charlie