Flying RC plane models

Discussion in 'Extended Mediums' started by copertura, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Ingenious! - L..
  2. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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  3. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Cheers Gil

    I see I will have to watch the RC sites a lot more.
    Great stuff Gil and thanks a lot for letting me know :D

    Rob
  4. TigerMike

    TigerMike New Member

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    Marked for later reading.
    Mike
  5. TigerMike

    TigerMike New Member

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    Marked for later reading.
    Mike
  6. Renaud

    Renaud Member

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    RC paper

    I remember now a Spanish RC planemaker, and this company, born two or three years ago, use thick cardstock on purpose. Unfortunately, I did not pay attention to the name of the company, but the models (I remember a WWI biplane, on reading a French magazine) looked very impressive.
    About Suzuki's aircrafts Leif Oh speaks about, I have to say that I enjoyed his gliders a lot, to such a point that I enlarged some of them up to four times...just to realize that either the paper should be so thick, making impossible the glider to fly, either enough thin and the glider subsequently too weak...
    If you enlarge the plane four times in lengh and span and make the paper four times thicker, weight is 4 X 4 X 4 the initial weight, but the wing area being only 4 X 4 bigger, the ratio weight/surface is four times the ratio allowed: you cannot change the paper thickness whatever your plane is large or not, unless you change the construction process.
    I am eager to build Ojimak's planes to see how they fly. Unlike Suzuki's creations, they are real three dimensional planes. So it should be possible to add some changes in order to reduce weight without weakening the structure, if bigger.
  7. Renaud

    Renaud Member

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    RC paper

    I remember now a Spanish RC planemaker, and this company, born two or three years ago, use thick cardstock on purpose. Unfortunately, I did not pay attention to the name of the company, but the models (I remember a WWI biplane, on reading a French magazine) looked very impressive.
    About Suzuki's aircrafts Leif Oh speaks about, I have to say that I enjoyed his gliders a lot, to such a point that I enlarged some of them up to four times...just to realize that either the paper should be so thick, making impossible the glider to fly, either enough thin and the glider subsequently too weak...
    If you enlarge the plane four times in lengh and span and make the paper four times thicker, weight is 4 X 4 X 4 the initial weight, but the wing area being only 4 X 4 bigger, the ratio weight/surface is four times the ratio allowed: you cannot change the paper thickness whatever your plane is large or not, unless you change the construction process.
    I am eager to build Ojimak's planes to see how they fly. Unlike Suzuki's creations, they are real three dimensional planes. So it should be possible to add some changes in order to reduce weight without weakening the structure, if bigger.