First weathered loco

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by spitfire, Dec 19, 2002.

  1. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Well, I found that Model RR mag article on weathering steam locos, and a few prototype pix on the net and finally gathered up the courage to paint the sucker. A lot of models have a very grey looking smoke box - from the photos I've seen that wasn't the case - at least it wasn't so obvious. The effect was more that it was a different texture - the loco would show shiny black paint, with soot and grime, but the firebox was totally matte in finish. I've tried to capture that look. The lighting here is not that great, but I can't wait for daylight to show y'all what I've done. I think I need to do a little more work on the "scale" dripping down the sides, but here she is so far.

    cheers
    ;) Val

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  2. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    And here's a boxcar.

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  3. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    Very nice Val :cool:
  4. TomPM

    TomPM Another Fried Egg Fan

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    Looking good. Weathering just seems to make the model come alive.
  5. Drew1125

    Drew1125 Active Member

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    Nice work Val!!:cool:
    Are you using an aur brush?
    For getting that sand & ash coloring on the yard goat (which tended to be dirtier than the road engines) try dry-brushing with some Polly Scale Concrete, or Aged White.
  6. Gary Pfeil

    Gary Pfeil Active Member

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    Nice work Val! In regard to the smokebox, it and the firebox were the hottest parts of the loco. The paint used on the rest of the loco didn't last as long on the smokebox. Especially the paints from the earlier days. When first placed in service after painting, the first thing that would happen is the paint finish would become flat. It wouldn't take to long before it would start to peel. In the very early days, the smokebox wasn't painted, they used Russia Iron. It had a nice blue tint, like gunmetal. That lighter color you refered to was the use of graphite, which helped withstand the heat. The best approach to painting a model is to work from prototype photos of the road you model, of course. If you are not modeling a particular prototype, paint as you wish, both the light and dark colors were common.

    Gary
  7. davidstrains

    davidstrains Active Member

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    very nice weathering on both the loco and the box car. The subtle hints of dirt and grime give it a "used" character. Let us see more as you get "creative":) :)
  8. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks guys!

    Gary, that's very interesting and useful info, and explains why I've seen both. I've been looking for prototype photos, but in the case of CN steam they're all black and white, which doesn't help much for colour. In the case of a loco built in 1927 still in use in the 1950's, which paint job do you think it would have?

    Charlie, I used a regular brush first to paint the boiler oily black, then airbrushed over it with engine black on top and a light grey mix on the sides. Then I did some light grey washes for the drips, and some rust washes for rust. I left the smokebox its original flat black, and finally repainted some oily black here and there. Then some white. Then more black, etc. Trying things basically. I've now done quite a few coats and its kind of hard to tell what's what anymore.

    I found this pic on the net that I really like, and now I'm thinking I need more light colour on top. What do you think?

    cheers
    :D Val

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  9. Gary Pfeil

    Gary Pfeil Active Member

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    Val, I can't say, I would suggest painting it the way you prefer, both are prototypical. In regard to your last post concerning the photo and a lighter color on top, I just had a conversation with Blake about this the other day. He told me he tints the black with blue and sprays this on the boiler top from above. This is to add the effect of "outdoors" (reflecting the sky). It is subtle but effective.

    Gary
  10. sumpter250

    sumpter250 multiscale modelbuilder

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    Val,
    I was going to comment on the pic, when I saw Gary's reply. some of that "lighter color" is sky reflection (locomotives were glossy when freshly painted). I have seen some of Blake's work, and didn't realize he had done the tinting. "Subtle but effective",very definitely!
    One thing which helps a steam loco model look far better is to eliminate the bright shine of the sides of the tires (the surface of the tire, and the flange would be "highly polished"), and the side, and main rods, and valve gear.
    The box car is beautifully done! Can't wait to see the loco when you've done everything you wanted to it.
    Pete
  11. marty w.

    marty w. Member

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    Looks great Val! Nice job.
    Marty
  12. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

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    Nice paint job Val. Well done and great photography too.
    What camera do you use?
  13. Casey Feedwater

    Casey Feedwater Member

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    Looks great, Val. I would have never known this was a "first-time effort" if you hadn't told us. Good job. :)
  14. Railery

    Railery Member

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    :D :D Great job. Looks like you've mastered the art of dirtying ;) Nice pictures . The box car looks good to. :)
  15. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    Here is some more pics for future reference Val. :)

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  16. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    #2

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  17. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    #3

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  18. Tyson Rayles

    Tyson Rayles Active Member

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    and the last one is from your side of the border.

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  19. aartwmich

    aartwmich Member

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    Nice job Val.......I'm gonna have to try that someday
  20. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks Tyson - those pix are going to be very useful. Thanks Gary, Pete, Marty, Robin, Casey and aart. Gary, the painting tip re the reflected sky is an interesting one - any idea where I can see Blake's work? Is he a Gauge member - cuz I don't recognize the name.

    Robin, my camera is the Olympus (brand of the gods) C730 Ultra Zoom.

    Here's an interesting bit of info I came across - it's John Allen's "warm black" mix for locos: 70% engine black, 25% white, 5% boxcar red. He varied the proportions from one loco to the next so they wouldn't all be the same.

    cheers
    ;) Val