Figures for paper model scales?

Discussion in 'Dioramas & Displays' started by Mindaugas, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hello friends,

    Thanks Dimas Karabas for taking your precious time for
    me and finding those figures. Really thanks Lizzie and
    shoki for advice.

    I've bought two sets from Zvezda with soviet
    assault group (6 figs.) and german MG team (3 figs.).
    They do not fit paper planes (you can try, but they will
    act as soldiers, not as pilots) so I decided to make them as a plastic models and to put them into diorama using paper for major
    model (walls, sidewalk bricks...).

    So I will try to use 1/35 (or 1/33 or 1/32) figures for planes.
    As there are not many pilots in such scale, so I will try to make
    a diorama with soldiers. Lets say a soldier sitting on a wing of
    a plane and another one taking photo of him :D

    And about 1/25 scale I can use only those german
    soldiers from Academy. As Piterpanzer said many
    figures come together with plastic tank kits and I
    won't buy those tanks because of figures (since I
    don't build plastic tanks - maybe I'll do this in future)
    (and also they are quite expensive.. :) )

    So the photos:

    Both kits:

    [​IMG]

    Soldiers. I have made about half body of every soldier, then I filled
    seams and sanded them. Now I'm going to paint
    armpits and body armor, and then I will attach
    hands and fill/sand them. I do this, because I
    paint with paintbrush, since I don't have airbrush.. It's hard to paint armpits with paintbrush, when hands are attached (or similar areas).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thats all. Good luck and thanks! ;)
    --
  2. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hello friends,

    Thanks Dimas Karabas for taking your precious time for
    me and finding those figures. Really thanks Lizzie and
    shoki for advice.

    I've bought two sets from Zvezda with soviet
    assault group (6 figs.) and german MG team (3 figs.).
    They do not fit paper planes (you can try, but they will
    act as soldiers, not as pilots) so I decided to make them as a plastic models and to put them into diorama using paper for major
    model (walls, sidewalk bricks...).

    So I will try to use 1/35 (or 1/33 or 1/32) figures for planes.
    As there are not many pilots in such scale, so I will try to make
    a diorama with soldiers. Lets say a soldier sitting on a wing of
    a plane and another one taking photo of him :D

    And about 1/25 scale I can use only those german
    soldiers from Academy. As Piterpanzer said many
    figures come together with plastic tank kits and I
    won't buy those tanks because of figures (since I
    don't build plastic tanks - maybe I'll do this in future)
    (and also they are quite expensive.. :) )

    So the photos:

    Both kits:

    [​IMG]

    Soldiers. I have made about half body of every soldier, then I filled
    seams and sanded them. Now I'm going to paint
    armpits and body armor, and then I will attach
    hands and fill/sand them. I do this, because I
    paint with paintbrush, since I don't have airbrush.. It's hard to paint armpits with paintbrush, when hands are attached (or similar areas).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thats all. Good luck and thanks! ;)
    --
  3. 46rob

    46rob Member

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  4. 46rob

    46rob Member

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  5. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    A few years ago, in Model Railroader magazine, was an article on creating your own, large scale figures. The technique used was to make a wire armature, as a skeleton of the figure. The next step was to mold and sculpt Fimo around the armature to produce the correctly proportioned body. the hands and face were then painted. here's where the cool part starts: Clothing was add to the figures by cutting out the various parts from paper, of idderent textures, saturated with a bit of white glue to give them a bit of flexibility....and then stiffness when dry, the "clothes were then painted with acrylicss. The results were some very realistic looking figures with clothes that actually looked like separte items, rather than the usually plastic casting. In model RR'ing--large scale can be anything from 1/32 and up. Since there's a wide variation in size between adult humans, you wouldn't have to be precise about your exact scale.
  6. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    A few years ago, in Model Railroader magazine, was an article on creating your own, large scale figures. The technique used was to make a wire armature, as a skeleton of the figure. The next step was to mold and sculpt Fimo around the armature to produce the correctly proportioned body. the hands and face were then painted. here's where the cool part starts: Clothing was add to the figures by cutting out the various parts from paper, of idderent textures, saturated with a bit of white glue to give them a bit of flexibility....and then stiffness when dry, the "clothes were then painted with acrylicss. The results were some very realistic looking figures with clothes that actually looked like separte items, rather than the usually plastic casting. In model RR'ing--large scale can be anything from 1/32 and up. Since there's a wide variation in size between adult humans, you wouldn't have to be precise about your exact scale.
  7. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hello 46rob,

    WOW! Thats a great idea. Thanks for sharing it with me!
    This is really useful, because I could never create such idea by my own.
    I will definately try this.

    So you can also engrave wrinkles on faces and fingers on hands with sanding file.. But I think, that making clothes may be a hard deal, but for that we are cardmodelers :D

    Good luck and thanks! ;)
    --
  8. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hello 46rob,

    WOW! Thats a great idea. Thanks for sharing it with me!
    This is really useful, because I could never create such idea by my own.
    I will definately try this.

    So you can also engrave wrinkles on faces and fingers on hands with sanding file.. But I think, that making clothes may be a hard deal, but for that we are cardmodelers :D

    Good luck and thanks! ;)
    --
  9. dimas Karabas

    dimas Karabas Member

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  10. dimas Karabas

    dimas Karabas Member

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  11. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hi Dimas Karabas,

    Thanks for nice link. Those dioramas are without humans. This type of dioramas is good for me, but sometimes I would like to make dioramas with people :roll:

    Also thanks everyone for links to e-shops. But it will be nonsense to buy 2-3 figures from each shop :D I need to find some Lithuanian guys to buy together or I must make a big list of goods, then to save several hundreds of "Litas" (Lithuanian money..) and to buy :D

    Ok, thanks very much! Good luck! ;)
    --
  12. Mindaugas

    Mindaugas Member

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    Hi Dimas Karabas,

    Thanks for nice link. Those dioramas are without humans. This type of dioramas is good for me, but sometimes I would like to make dioramas with people :roll:

    Also thanks everyone for links to e-shops. But it will be nonsense to buy 2-3 figures from each shop :D I need to find some Lithuanian guys to buy together or I must make a big list of goods, then to save several hundreds of "Litas" (Lithuanian money..) and to buy :D

    Ok, thanks very much! Good luck! ;)
    --
  13. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    Making clothes for figures--the time I tried it--I used paper bag material--isn't hard--just time consuming. You just look at typical pants, shirts, coats, etc---see how the individual pieces of cloth are sewn together, and duplicate it in miniature.
  14. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    Making clothes for figures--the time I tried it--I used paper bag material--isn't hard--just time consuming. You just look at typical pants, shirts, coats, etc---see how the individual pieces of cloth are sewn together, and duplicate it in miniature.
  15. Sticky Fingers

    Sticky Fingers Member

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    When I was a wee tyke the guy across the street was a big model railroad buff. One trick he used for figures in HO was to make them out of pipe cleaners and paint appropriately. He'd use them in spots where he needed large numbers of figures such as station platforms etc but he would use some of the comercial ones that were available at the time (early '60s, late '50s) The total effect was quite effective IIRC. Think along the lines of the railroad yard scene from Gone with the Wind. Most of the "casualties" are little more than piles of blankets. In fact you can see stretcher bears step on one of them if you look carefully.
  16. Sticky Fingers

    Sticky Fingers Member

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    When I was a wee tyke the guy across the street was a big model railroad buff. One trick he used for figures in HO was to make them out of pipe cleaners and paint appropriately. He'd use them in spots where he needed large numbers of figures such as station platforms etc but he would use some of the comercial ones that were available at the time (early '60s, late '50s) The total effect was quite effective IIRC. Think along the lines of the railroad yard scene from Gone with the Wind. Most of the "casualties" are little more than piles of blankets. In fact you can see stretcher bears step on one of them if you look carefully.
  17. ARMORMAN

    ARMORMAN Guest

    Generic man, Alpha Build. Designed for 1/32 or smaller model kits (I HATE steamroller flat figs with beautiful models).

    [​IMG]

    Bill
  18. ARMORMAN

    ARMORMAN Guest

    Generic man, Alpha Build. Designed for 1/32 or smaller model kits (I HATE steamroller flat figs with beautiful models).

    [​IMG]

    Bill
  19. Corporal_Trim

    Corporal_Trim Member

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    Hi, Mindaugas.

    Regarding your quest for 1:32 figures, there are many 1:32 figures made for slot car racing, Scalextric and others. They are drivers, pit crew, officials and spectators. Probably not very good for airplane dioramas, but conversions are always a possibility. Also, wouldn't the numerous types of plastic 54mm toy soldiers be just about right for a 1:33 tank diorama ?
  20. Corporal_Trim

    Corporal_Trim Member

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    Hi, Mindaugas.

    Regarding your quest for 1:32 figures, there are many 1:32 figures made for slot car racing, Scalextric and others. They are drivers, pit crew, officials and spectators. Probably not very good for airplane dioramas, but conversions are always a possibility. Also, wouldn't the numerous types of plastic 54mm toy soldiers be just about right for a 1:33 tank diorama ?