Fat Albert

Discussion in 'Gallery & Designs' started by Gil, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 Member

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    The Galaxy truly is an amazing and beautiful bird. We still have the privilege of seeing them here in San Antonio, but not as much as we used to.

    Ryan
  2. RyanShort1

    RyanShort1 Member

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    The Galaxy truly is an amazing and beautiful bird. We still have the privilege of seeing them here in San Antonio, but not as much as we used to.

    Ryan
  3. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    GE TF39 Turbo Fan Engine Nacelle

    Nearly finished the surface model for the TF39 tonight. This was the first of the High Bypass Turbo Fan engines which now power every airliner. The year of the contract was 1965. Next the engine pylons...,

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  4. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    GE TF39 Turbo Fan Engine Nacelle

    Nearly finished the surface model for the TF39 tonight. This was the first of the High Bypass Turbo Fan engines which now power every airliner. The year of the contract was 1965. Next the engine pylons...,

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  5. Willja67

    Willja67 Member

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    That's very impressive work. It amazes me that you are such a good builder and also very capable around the computer. I hope to one day match your skill in the computer arena though I don't expect to in the building arena. A tutorial on how you made your 3d model might be a good idea. Just to show you how dense I am it had not really occured to me until recently to build the model in 3d without any concessions for converting it so it can be unrolled. I just made all mine so far so that everything can be unrolled.
  6. Willja67

    Willja67 Member

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    That's very impressive work. It amazes me that you are such a good builder and also very capable around the computer. I hope to one day match your skill in the computer arena though I don't expect to in the building arena. A tutorial on how you made your 3d model might be a good idea. Just to show you how dense I am it had not really occured to me until recently to build the model in 3d without any concessions for converting it so it can be unrolled. I just made all mine so far so that everything can be unrolled.
  7. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

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    Im hoping for 1/33...right????


    John John
  8. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

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    Im hoping for 1/33...right????


    John John
  9. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Surface Development

    Wilja,

    I did it that way too only to find that if the surface isn't right in the beginning it leads to a less than satisfactory result in the end. The real benefit is that the frames can be developed easily from it. I found that building a surface from a network of curves command to be one of the most powerful in Rhino's repertoire. It can save an incredible amount of work. I suggest that you just play around with it on nothing in particular to test it out. The nose of the Galaxy consists of about four curves in a network. Consider my suprise when a Galaxy nose popped out of the network of curves command!

    I guess the real wonder of all this is that such beautiful shapes can be generated by so very few but well defined inputs (or so little information). It's somewhat like DNA in that respect...,

    On the subject of scale. I've avoided this as everyone seems to have their own desires. It will be between 1:87 and 1:96. Haven't really selected one yet but those are the candidates. This yields a model with a wingspan of around 30 inches (76 cm).

    -Gil
  10. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Surface Development

    Wilja,

    I did it that way too only to find that if the surface isn't right in the beginning it leads to a less than satisfactory result in the end. The real benefit is that the frames can be developed easily from it. I found that building a surface from a network of curves command to be one of the most powerful in Rhino's repertoire. It can save an incredible amount of work. I suggest that you just play around with it on nothing in particular to test it out. The nose of the Galaxy consists of about four curves in a network. Consider my suprise when a Galaxy nose popped out of the network of curves command!

    I guess the real wonder of all this is that such beautiful shapes can be generated by so very few but well defined inputs (or so little information). It's somewhat like DNA in that respect...,

    On the subject of scale. I've avoided this as everyone seems to have their own desires. It will be between 1:87 and 1:96. Haven't really selected one yet but those are the candidates. This yields a model with a wingspan of around 30 inches (76 cm).

    -Gil
  11. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

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    Is this for yourself or will you be publishing it?

    thanks

    John John
  12. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

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    Is this for yourself or will you be publishing it?

    thanks

    John John
  13. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    1/96 would be cool.......... and I too hope you will let us all in on the build!

    Does using this technique also allows for the texturing (panel lines, markings, etc) to be applied before un-folding?

    john
  14. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    1/96 would be cool.......... and I too hope you will let us all in on the build!

    Does using this technique also allows for the texturing (panel lines, markings, etc) to be applied before un-folding?

    john
  15. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Publishing?

    John John,

    Good question. I haven't really haven't reached any decision yet. Let's see how it turns out first.

    Designing a model for yourself is much easier than designing for publication. Designing for publication forces a certain discipline on the design and development making it a business rather than a hobby which isn't my real intent on this project although it is something that should be thought out...,

    -Gil
  16. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Publishing?

    John John,

    Good question. I haven't really haven't reached any decision yet. Let's see how it turns out first.

    Designing a model for yourself is much easier than designing for publication. Designing for publication forces a certain discipline on the design and development making it a business rather than a hobby which isn't my real intent on this project although it is something that should be thought out...,

    -Gil
  17. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Panel & Outlines

    John,

    The surface development method I'm using is one step above surfaces which can be unfolded or developed but do reflect that the object is directed toward a model (note that only the fan and turbine blades that show are implemented in the ghost image below). Once the high level surface is satisfactory it will undergo "slicing" to obtain the individual frame elements. These will then be used to develop the surface segments which will then have panel & outline detail projected onto them before they are unfolded. Painting of the developed surfaces will be performed in Illustrator or Photoshop.

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  18. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Panel & Outlines

    John,

    The surface development method I'm using is one step above surfaces which can be unfolded or developed but do reflect that the object is directed toward a model (note that only the fan and turbine blades that show are implemented in the ghost image below). Once the high level surface is satisfactory it will undergo "slicing" to obtain the individual frame elements. These will then be used to develop the surface segments which will then have panel & outline detail projected onto them before they are unfolded. Painting of the developed surfaces will be performed in Illustrator or Photoshop.

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  19. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    Ah the C-5...

    When I was discharged from the USAF (honorably!) in 1986 I had saved all my leave until the end of my service period and applied it to what was known as 'terminal leave'. Basically, it meant that I could leave two weeks early, and just 'not come back' to base, ever. So I 'got out', and drove from Vandenberg AFB where I had been stationed for nearly four years up to Travis AFB north of San Francisco. I abandoned my junker car there, and 'hopped' a MAC flight on a C-5 bound for Japan for $10. I had no real plan and not much money either; I just winged it. In hindsight I should probably have thought it through a bit more. But then I may not have done it...
    The upper deck of the huge plane was empty, aside from a single military family (who, unlike me, had thought to bring along something to eat on the long flight). The main payload was in the cargo bay below deck; we were just traveling on it's back on a 'Space-A' (space-available) basis like fleas.
    The giant C-5 stopped in Hawaii on the way for refueling. While stretching my legs I happened to look out the tiny porthole above the wing and observed airport workers swarming about in shorts and Tshirts- in February! I quickly abandoned my 'plans' for Japan and spent the next two weeks in Waikiki in 85 degree weather. I managed to book a room a few nights at a time for about $30 a night (a steal!) at one of the Outrigger Hotels. When I was about out of money I had to find a way back to the mainland (oops- I'd forgotten about that part of my scheme. Since my leave had ended I was now officially no longer in the military, so I couldn't hop another MAC flight back). I had less than $150 left, but somehow I managed to get a walk-up ticket on Hawaiian Air (now defunct?) back to San Francisco for $125 (an even bigger steal).
    At the airport in SF I spent a free night at the USO, then took a greyhound 'home' to SLC. I got home to the freezing snow of SLC, sunburned and tired, wearing a pair of cheap Hawaiian shorts , whereupon a gent saw me and announced to everyone in earshot; 'That boy's been tuh Hu-wah-ee!'
    I've returned many times since, but that visit still tops them all.
  20. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    Ah the C-5...

    When I was discharged from the USAF (honorably!) in 1986 I had saved all my leave until the end of my service period and applied it to what was known as 'terminal leave'. Basically, it meant that I could leave two weeks early, and just 'not come back' to base, ever. So I 'got out', and drove from Vandenberg AFB where I had been stationed for nearly four years up to Travis AFB north of San Francisco. I abandoned my junker car there, and 'hopped' a MAC flight on a C-5 bound for Japan for $10. I had no real plan and not much money either; I just winged it. In hindsight I should probably have thought it through a bit more. But then I may not have done it...
    The upper deck of the huge plane was empty, aside from a single military family (who, unlike me, had thought to bring along something to eat on the long flight). The main payload was in the cargo bay below deck; we were just traveling on it's back on a 'Space-A' (space-available) basis like fleas.
    The giant C-5 stopped in Hawaii on the way for refueling. While stretching my legs I happened to look out the tiny porthole above the wing and observed airport workers swarming about in shorts and Tshirts- in February! I quickly abandoned my 'plans' for Japan and spent the next two weeks in Waikiki in 85 degree weather. I managed to book a room a few nights at a time for about $30 a night (a steal!) at one of the Outrigger Hotels. When I was about out of money I had to find a way back to the mainland (oops- I'd forgotten about that part of my scheme. Since my leave had ended I was now officially no longer in the military, so I couldn't hop another MAC flight back). I had less than $150 left, but somehow I managed to get a walk-up ticket on Hawaiian Air (now defunct?) back to San Francisco for $125 (an even bigger steal).
    At the airport in SF I spent a free night at the USO, then took a greyhound 'home' to SLC. I got home to the freezing snow of SLC, sunburned and tired, wearing a pair of cheap Hawaiian shorts , whereupon a gent saw me and announced to everyone in earshot; 'That boy's been tuh Hu-wah-ee!'
    I've returned many times since, but that visit still tops them all.