Fat Albert

Discussion in 'Gallery & Designs' started by Gil, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    I have been working on this subject for over a decade. First gathering, or shall I say, attempting to gather drawing and cross sectional information for this bird. It's interesting to note that there isn't a lot of material available on it which is somewhat of an interesting mystery unto itself (Spooks, must be spooks about). There are a lot of photographs of it but a problem arises is that it is so big that it's more like a ship picture than an aircraft picture. No wonder they called the Lockheed-Martin plant that produced it in Georgia the "Ship Factory".

    I finally decided that the only way to start the project was to begin modeling the fuselage which is shown here for the first time. Albert was the first all CAD aircraft produced by Lockheed. The fuselage actually concists of very few definition curves but uses complex curve lofts to realize the surface (guess how I found out...,). Achieving results has been mostly through studying the structure and then trying several different versions of constructs in an attempt to achieve the surface. Needles and haystacks but every once in awhile somehting actually goes right and it goes into the keeper followed by a lengthy messing about to get the next section right so it too can be added. The drawing package is Rhino (of course) and the renderer used for the images is Penguin. Panel lines have already been drawn but not applied as the next step is to section out formers and start portioning the surface into devleopapble sections (with the applied panel detail). The scale is a nice ship scale number. Let you all guess what that is. Now to think about all that wing high lift generating stuff. Be great to have all that stuff hanging out though. Open door fuselage interior? Ramps? Scale armour deplaning on the ramp...,


    Best, -Gil

    [​IMG]
  2. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    I have been working on this subject for over a decade. First gathering, or shall I say, attempting to gather drawing and cross sectional information for this bird. It's interesting to note that there isn't a lot of material available on it which is somewhat of an interesting mystery unto itself (Spooks, must be spooks about). There are a lot of photographs of it but a problem arises is that it is so big that it's more like a ship picture than an aircraft picture. No wonder they called the Lockheed-Martin plant that produced it in Georgia the "Ship Factory".

    I finally decided that the only way to start the project was to begin modeling the fuselage which is shown here for the first time. Albert was the first all CAD aircraft produced by Lockheed. The fuselage actually concists of very few definition curves but uses complex curve lofts to realize the surface (guess how I found out...,). Achieving results has been mostly through studying the structure and then trying several different versions of constructs in an attempt to achieve the surface. Needles and haystacks but every once in awhile somehting actually goes right and it goes into the keeper followed by a lengthy messing about to get the next section right so it too can be added. The drawing package is Rhino (of course) and the renderer used for the images is Penguin. Panel lines have already been drawn but not applied as the next step is to section out formers and start portioning the surface into devleopapble sections (with the applied panel detail). The scale is a nice ship scale number. Let you all guess what that is. Now to think about all that wing high lift generating stuff. Be great to have all that stuff hanging out though. Open door fuselage interior? Ramps? Scale armour deplaning on the ramp...,


    Best, -Gil

    [​IMG]
  3. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Alright Gil......... to a Navy Brat like me "Fat Albert" means a blue and gold C-130.............blasting off the runway with JATO bottles stuck outside!

    This here bird looks like a Galaxy to me..........

    or do I have my heavy Lockheed birds all wrong?

    john
  4. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Alright Gil......... to a Navy Brat like me "Fat Albert" means a blue and gold C-130.............blasting off the runway with JATO bottles stuck outside!

    This here bird looks like a Galaxy to me..........

    or do I have my heavy Lockheed birds all wrong?

    john
  5. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    To me fat albert is a cartoon character. HEY HEY HEY! So that top right image is fitting. :D Looking forward to seeing the progression!
    Chris
  6. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    To me fat albert is a cartoon character. HEY HEY HEY! So that top right image is fitting. :D Looking forward to seeing the progression!
    Chris
  7. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    me too Chris...thought i'd get to have a little chubster with the big lips sitting on my desktop...cheesy cartoon...but I loved it.
  8. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    me too Chris...thought i'd get to have a little chubster with the big lips sitting on my desktop...cheesy cartoon...but I loved it.
  9. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    Having seen plenty of C-5 Galaxy aircraft take off and fly around Delaware
    (they are stationed at Dover AFB)

    I would agree, this model of yours Gil is a Galaxy

    and I am with John, Fat Albert is the Blue Angels C-130.

    Rick
  10. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    Having seen plenty of C-5 Galaxy aircraft take off and fly around Delaware
    (they are stationed at Dover AFB)

    I would agree, this model of yours Gil is a Galaxy

    and I am with John, Fat Albert is the Blue Angels C-130.

    Rick
  11. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Fat Albert Deux

    Yeah, that's one of the nicks that the C-5 is also known as amongst others;

    C-5 Galaxy
    Aluminum Overcast*, Cumulus Aluminus,
    Big Mac, Fat Albert,
    FRED (Foolishly Ridiculous Economic Disaster)**
    Linda Lovelace,Queer* (PIC)

    I also like Cumulus Aluminus...,

    -Gil
  12. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Fat Albert Deux

    Yeah, that's one of the nicks that the C-5 is also known as amongst others;

    C-5 Galaxy
    Aluminum Overcast*, Cumulus Aluminus,
    Big Mac, Fat Albert,
    FRED (Foolishly Ridiculous Economic Disaster)**
    Linda Lovelace,Queer* (PIC)

    I also like Cumulus Aluminus...,

    -Gil
  13. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    No matter the name it's one BIG plane.

    Last air show we had in our lovely city, New York ANG sent one down for us to oogle........... they put up the nose, opened the tail and it was truly amazing to see. With with both ends opened it echoed inside.

    Ok Gil................ no one else guessed at the scale so I'm taking 1/250! This is what I'd like to see, Texman will say 1/144, and would probably down scale at that!:grin:

    Are you planning a series of these big boys............ a C-133 and C-124 would be nice! Oh...... and the new C-17 would be sweet too! The MS ANG fly them so I get to see them all the time.

    Wow......... Nieuport 17 to C-5a Galaxy.......... I just realized that!

    john
  14. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    No matter the name it's one BIG plane.

    Last air show we had in our lovely city, New York ANG sent one down for us to oogle........... they put up the nose, opened the tail and it was truly amazing to see. With with both ends opened it echoed inside.

    Ok Gil................ no one else guessed at the scale so I'm taking 1/250! This is what I'd like to see, Texman will say 1/144, and would probably down scale at that!:grin:

    Are you planning a series of these big boys............ a C-133 and C-124 would be nice! Oh...... and the new C-17 would be sweet too! The MS ANG fly them so I get to see them all the time.

    Wow......... Nieuport 17 to C-5a Galaxy.......... I just realized that!

    john
  15. Ashrunner

    Ashrunner Member

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    To an old airman, it is definitely "Fat Albert." That bird got that nickname from the site of it coming in for a landing. It was a big, fat thing floating down from above.

    When I was stationed in Alaska, I could hear the whine of the engines several minutes before Job Control would call to tell us (fuels folks) that one was coming in and required refueling. Watching one take off was a sight also. You would swear it wasn't going fast enough to lift-off when suddenly, the nose would rise and shortly afterwards, so would the entire aircraft. Amazing sight, it was.

    In 1986, I flew on a C-5 from San Antonio, Texas to San Fransisco, California to attend a WANG computer conference. Shortly after the aircraft obtained cruise altitude, one of the crew from below (the Galaxy has a passenger compartment in the upper spine area forward of the tail) and asked if we were interested in a game of basketball. Several of us agreed and we went down to the cargo compartment, where planking had been placed on the deck and a backboard and hoop lowered. It was half court round ball all the way to the west coast. Sure is fun trying to shoot a "swisher" in turbulance. 8v) We had a lot of fun and most of us ended up with a number of bumps and bruises. But it was worth it.

    Nice to see someone modeling this memory filled aircraft.
  16. Ashrunner

    Ashrunner Member

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    To an old airman, it is definitely "Fat Albert." That bird got that nickname from the site of it coming in for a landing. It was a big, fat thing floating down from above.

    When I was stationed in Alaska, I could hear the whine of the engines several minutes before Job Control would call to tell us (fuels folks) that one was coming in and required refueling. Watching one take off was a sight also. You would swear it wasn't going fast enough to lift-off when suddenly, the nose would rise and shortly afterwards, so would the entire aircraft. Amazing sight, it was.

    In 1986, I flew on a C-5 from San Antonio, Texas to San Fransisco, California to attend a WANG computer conference. Shortly after the aircraft obtained cruise altitude, one of the crew from below (the Galaxy has a passenger compartment in the upper spine area forward of the tail) and asked if we were interested in a game of basketball. Several of us agreed and we went down to the cargo compartment, where planking had been placed on the deck and a backboard and hoop lowered. It was half court round ball all the way to the west coast. Sure is fun trying to shoot a "swisher" in turbulance. 8v) We had a lot of fun and most of us ended up with a number of bumps and bruises. But it was worth it.

    Nice to see someone modeling this memory filled aircraft.
  17. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    C-5B Lockheed-Martin Galaxy

    Nice memory Ash and I agree with your impressions. The first time I saw this aircraft was at Travis AFB north of San Francisco. It was more like an airship than an airplane. That's when I decided that speed and size can be very deceptive. From Nieuport to Galaxy does sound like a stretch but I work on a lot of stuff and the Galaxy just finally could not, would not be pushed down the stack any longer.

    If you examine the after part of the fuselage you'll notice a notch that begins just aft of the wing and blends into the tail area gradually. This is the deck line of the compartment Ash spoke of that contains seating. It also works out that the profile shape of this compartment is a circular arc. The reason for the tail raising up like this are two fold, one, it provides the airstream a lift up as it flows back around the fuselage preventing the flow from separating from the fuselage and creating a large drag penalty. And, two, the structure is stiffened by cabin pressurization working to maintain shape and stiffens the entire tail assembl. A similar, although smaller, structure can be observed on the C-141. The Herc just makes a lot of turbulence.

    Another interesting factor that popped out of all this is that modern jet transport aircraft follow a fairly predictable design forumula:

    -Straight circular single deck or a figure "8" for double decks (A380 is an may be an exception)
    -Streamlined nose with avionics nose cover
    -Streamlined tail (airliner) or with streamlined "burble bubble" (cargo doors)
    -Streamlined wheel well compartments (pods on the sides)
    -Single strut nose gear
    -Wheel wells and wing attach points are very near the center of gravity and represent the stongest section of the aircraft
    -Horizontal, vertical stabilizers and wing sweep are all at, or nearly at the same angle

    Boring but efficient I guess.

    Currently working on the GE TF39 high bypass turbofan engine and the attach struts. I've got a technique that's been tucked away especially for the fan in these units. It will be interesting to see how it works out. Notice that the forward inlet to the fan shroud is angled. Early flight testing experienced compressor stalls during high power takeoffs providing some really interesting experiences for those involved. The down tilt resulted as part of the "fix"...,

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  18. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    C-5B Lockheed-Martin Galaxy

    Nice memory Ash and I agree with your impressions. The first time I saw this aircraft was at Travis AFB north of San Francisco. It was more like an airship than an airplane. That's when I decided that speed and size can be very deceptive. From Nieuport to Galaxy does sound like a stretch but I work on a lot of stuff and the Galaxy just finally could not, would not be pushed down the stack any longer.

    If you examine the after part of the fuselage you'll notice a notch that begins just aft of the wing and blends into the tail area gradually. This is the deck line of the compartment Ash spoke of that contains seating. It also works out that the profile shape of this compartment is a circular arc. The reason for the tail raising up like this are two fold, one, it provides the airstream a lift up as it flows back around the fuselage preventing the flow from separating from the fuselage and creating a large drag penalty. And, two, the structure is stiffened by cabin pressurization working to maintain shape and stiffens the entire tail assembl. A similar, although smaller, structure can be observed on the C-141. The Herc just makes a lot of turbulence.

    Another interesting factor that popped out of all this is that modern jet transport aircraft follow a fairly predictable design forumula:

    -Straight circular single deck or a figure "8" for double decks (A380 is an may be an exception)
    -Streamlined nose with avionics nose cover
    -Streamlined tail (airliner) or with streamlined "burble bubble" (cargo doors)
    -Streamlined wheel well compartments (pods on the sides)
    -Single strut nose gear
    -Wheel wells and wing attach points are very near the center of gravity and represent the stongest section of the aircraft
    -Horizontal, vertical stabilizers and wing sweep are all at, or nearly at the same angle

    Boring but efficient I guess.

    Currently working on the GE TF39 high bypass turbofan engine and the attach struts. I've got a technique that's been tucked away especially for the fan in these units. It will be interesting to see how it works out. Notice that the forward inlet to the fan shroud is angled. Early flight testing experienced compressor stalls during high power takeoffs providing some really interesting experiences for those involved. The down tilt resulted as part of the "fix"...,

    -Gil

    [​IMG]
  19. shrike

    shrike Guest

    I recall them coming in and out of McGuire when I was at Ft Dix. Our barracks were directly off the end of one of the runways and they were pickier than usual about having dog tags on 110% of the time in case they had to know which shovel of ashes to send home.
    The shorter than usual length of inlet before the first fan gives them that distinctive bansee wail. Easy to tell them from the 141's that made up the other half of traffic.
    I also learend that if you are tired enough you can sleep through anything - including a loaded C-5 clawing it's way skyward a couple hundred feet overhead.
  20. shrike

    shrike Guest

    I recall them coming in and out of McGuire when I was at Ft Dix. Our barracks were directly off the end of one of the runways and they were pickier than usual about having dog tags on 110% of the time in case they had to know which shovel of ashes to send home.
    The shorter than usual length of inlet before the first fan gives them that distinctive bansee wail. Easy to tell them from the 141's that made up the other half of traffic.
    I also learend that if you are tired enough you can sleep through anything - including a loaded C-5 clawing it's way skyward a couple hundred feet overhead.