Fall scenery

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by csxengineer, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. csxengineer

    csxengineer Member

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    Is there any threads regarding making fall scenery? I just got tired of the all green monotony, and started transitioning it to the fall colors. It's kinda tough, I could use advice. I am using woodland scenics fall foilage. Thanks
  2. MadCoW1

    MadCoW1 Member

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    Hello csxengineer, I don't spend enough time here to have read any threads on fall colors. It is tough to get it down. I'm no expert by ANY means, but, I find that using the combination of real weeds(sprigs) and the woodland scenics fall foliage colors to be quite satisfactory. I also am experimenting with making my own birch trees which play nice into fall scenes.

    This photo shows my bridge diorama using said weeds. Here in Wisconsin, I go down by the tracks and look for things that resemble 'little trees'. This is the perfect time of year for it here. I was out harvesting more today. After picking, I soak them in a 50/50 glue and water mixture and hang them from clothespins to let them dry for about 3 days. This helps them withstand the occasional bumps they seem to get. Then I use cheap spraypaint to paint them gray(primer), a mist of black, and a light overcoat of brown. While this is still wet, I dip them back into the glue mixture and sprinkle varying colors of ground foam. And Wha-Lah!! Trees!! Hope this helps. If not, feel free to ask away. These photos are meant to represent late fall, like around the first freeze.

    [​IMG]

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    Johnny
  3. Jim Krause

    Jim Krause Active Member

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    That's great looking foliage, csx.
  4. csxengineer

    csxengineer Member

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    Nice work.

    If you dip them into the glue mix while the paint is still wet, doesn't it run? Your scene was very inspiring.
  5. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    I'm going to guess that he is probably not using water base paints and that by "wet" he meant "tacky." I'm going to guess that dipping the tree armature into the glue mix while still tacky probably promotes a better bond between the glue and the branch?
  6. MadCoW1

    MadCoW1 Member

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    Yeh, you assumed correctly. The paints are NOT acrylic and, as I usually do at least 25 trees at a time, By the time I get back to dipping the first painted it is just 'tacky'. Although I am no chemist, this step does work well.

    Johnny
  7. MadCoW1

    MadCoW1 Member

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    Thanks....

    Another way you can do it, I use both depending on my mood and amount of trees I'm doing. Intead of re-dipping into glue mixture, coat the armatures with a spray adhesive such as 'Elmer's' craft spray adhesive. This is a lot less messy and the foliage is less prone to clinging to the trunks of the trees. This giving a more 'airy' look to the little buggers. Note, if you don't want hands that look like they've been in your nose all day, I highly suggest using disposable gloves.

    Glad my pics were inspiring for you.

    Johnny