Fading letters

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by Biased turkey, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    I just did some test to apply a technique ( from Kalmbach book Basic Painting and Weathering For Models Railroaders " using some artist's pencils and a stiff brush to fade the letters.
    I like the result and it just take a few minutes to apply the technique.
    [​IMG]


    Jacques
  2. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Good results, Jacques. You mention pencils and a brush, so it sounds as if this involves rubbing the pencils on sandpaper, then applying the resultant powder using the brush, similar to chalk weathering. Do you apply a clear sealer over the results? Doing so over chalk often reduces the effect of the weathering, but yours looks good.
    Another technique not so much for fading but rather "toning down" of lettering is to apply a very dilute wash or airbrushed spray over the entire car, using the cars basic colour. This should be mostly thinner, and just enough pigment to make the lettering less stark. This is useful for making a "new" car that's seen only a few miles of service, or as the first step in a more severe weathering job.

    Wayne
  3. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    Wayne,
    It works like this:
    1) With a knife, sharpen the white artist's crayon to a point.
    2) Trace over the bottom of the letter ( not under the letter ) with the crayon.
    3) Use a stiff brush to streak the crayon down the car side.

    and ... voila.

    It is just a test, so I didn't seal the crayon with Testor's dullcote or any equivalent product.

    About the other technique for toning down, I remember that you mentioned it in your very good weathering tutorial. I found the technique interesting not just for the lettering, but to give an overall "light" weathering.
    Are you running CPR boxcars on your layout? Would Polly Scale 0404061 CP red fill the bill ? ( is it the same as CPR action red ? ).
    But first this week I'll do some truck weathering ( start at the base ) and retry some rusting on the CPR boxcar using oil colors ( burnt umber, burnt sienna and raw umber ) I did some test but had to wipe the oil colors because I was not satisfied with the result ( it was overdone ).

    Here are some more pics of the artist's crayon technique.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Jacques
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Good results, especially from such a simple technique.
    The PollyScale CPRail Action Red should be close enough to do the fading, but make sure to thin it severely.

    While I do run some CPR cars on my layout, none are in the Action Red scheme.
    Here's one of the ones with the newest paint scheme:
    [​IMG]

    Of these two reefers, the one closest to the loco is a bit older than the boxcar shown above, while the second one is older still:
    [​IMG]

    And this is about the oldest CPR scheme that I have in service:
    [​IMG]

    Wayne