Elevating track

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by Rath150, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    HI,
    Absolute newbie Just getting started in railroading at the young age of 70. I must be crazy!

    I recently purchased a layout but want to revise it with elevating a portions of the track.
    In my first effort, the problem arose. When the train reached its peak the cars had a tendency to disconnect.
    How can I make the trnsitions from the grade (up) and the down grade? I can't seem to get a smooth transition from up to flat to down.
    I plan to have the heightest point 3-4". I have enough distance to accomodate the grade requirements.
    The longest portion of the layout is sort of a "U". One end is 4x6' - mid is 4x8' other end is
    4x8'.
    The track takes up most of each portion.
    How many power connecitons should I have to assure good power to the entire track?

    That is enough for now.

    I'll have many more as I progress!

    Thanks

    Rath150:wave:
  2. Nomad

    Nomad Active Member

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    Rath, welcome to model railroading!.:D To answer your questions,we need more info. How are you elevating your tracks? And, what are you using for a power supply? Dc or dcc? And, what gauge of track are you using? On your grade, does it go up and down like a roller coaster?. If so, you need a straight of flat track on top.
    Loren
  3. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 Member

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    pictures would be lovely too if its possible ;)
  4. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    elevated track

    Thank you for your responses.
    First, I have HO.
    I am presently using pillars for elevation.
    Yes to the up and down with the use of flat track at the top.
    I guess I have DC? Regardless, i have no problem with my engines with a full compliment of cars making the hall.
    The disconnects occur where the elevation meets the flat track. Not all the time but too frequently. When th engine or cars levels of on the flat track the back lifts resulting in the disconnect of the following car.

    Thanks

    Rath150
  5. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    Hi Rath and welcome!

    Do you mean those gray plastic pillars for elevation? I suspect what's happening is that once the grade meets the flat section at the top its too abrupt an angle for the couplers to handle and they seperate. You may have better luck using some flex track (these are yard long sections of track that can bend into curves) for your grades. Flex track might offer a little more of an easy transition, especially if you lay the track so there is no joint right at the top like there is now.
    Ralph
  6. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 Member

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    any track piece that is somewhat short (like EZ track) there isnt much support to stay straight where the tracks join, it is weaker there, therefore it can bend easier, the rest of the track is stronger so it strays straight, so basically you get a sudden change in angle where the snap together track connects to antoher track...
  7. RonP

    RonP Member of the WMRC

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    i would shim the pillars preceding the last one to ease off on the transition, maybe starting the grade slightly steeper and making a gradual climax.
  8. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    My elevation in on the straight away. No curve. What difference does that make??
    I tried the shims but it always puts the kink a down to the next section.
  9. zedob

    zedob Member

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    You are using an inherently poor option for elevating track. You are better off jigsawing (straight skill sawing in this case) your trackplan out of a piece of 1/2" plywood. The transitions will be much smoother, giving that the joint between two peices of plywood isn't located at the top of your incline, but even that is easy enough to fix.


    Post some pics if you can.
  10. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    Hi Rath,
    If you wrote that in response to my remarks about flex track, no I'm not suggesting your grade be on a curve but flex track is three feet long without a joint and its flexible enough that it can curve slightly up or down to create a smooth transition to the final elevation like you want. I believe that would eliminate the problematic joint.

    zedob's comments are well worth considering if you plan to create a layout that you want to make permanent.
  11. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 Member

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    ralph check ur PM ASAP
  12. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    Got it prodigy2k7...spam removed. Again, thanks to you members who use PMs or the triangle shaped "report bad post icon" (which notifies all moderators) found in the lower left of every post window. The sooner we are alerted to spam the sooner we can zap it!
    Ralph
  13. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 Member

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    actually i did both lol... just incase 1 was slower to react than the other lol
  14. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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    The triangle is the best bet. It immediately sends an email to the entire Gauge staff so any of us online can deal with it.
    Ralph

    We now return to the original thread! :)
  15. Quinn222

    Quinn222 Member

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    I can also suggest the Woodland Scenic foam inclines. They are inexpensive and foolproof. Since I'm not much with the power saw I went that route.

    Christina
  16. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    elevated track

    Thanks to you all for your asssistance. I have a few sections of flex track. It appears that it will be the solution to this problem. Also, I purchased the scenic inclines and will use them instead of the pillars.
    I should have come here first. But you know the male ego - can't ask directions. Especially
    us OLD ones.

    Thanks

    Paul
  17. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    elevated track

    Morning,

    As far as the pix are concerned - not really ready for that yet. I am in the process of completely changing the layout - plus intalling foam as the base. So, there is not much to see other than the size of the layout.
    Plus, another major reason - not knowing how to present pix or get them into the message.
    To give you a shallow idea or base of the layout - the two ends are 4x6' and 4x8' and the center section is also 4x8'.
    Oh, one thing I did not have answered was the number and placement of the connections for power on the track. As far as I am able to determine, the larger track will be apporximately 60 sections of track. Also the number of derailers needed? I may have two smaller tracks within the larger track.
  18. Ralph

    Ralph Remember...it's for fun!

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  19. Rath150

    Rath150 Member

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    elevated track

    Thank ou very much for the detailed information on using pix.
    One more thing learned? (Hopefully)