Edge glueing

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by johnflys2, Apr 18, 2007.

  1. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    As I build more models I find occasionally I need to edge glue. There must be a better way than the mess I'm making. What is the proper technique for alignment and strength? John
  2. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    As I build more models I find occasionally I need to edge glue. There must be a better way than the mess I'm making. What is the proper technique for alignment and strength? John
  3. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    Put glue on edge, fidget with it until it sets. Your question is vague...can you elaborate further?
  4. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    Put glue on edge, fidget with it until it sets. Your question is vague...can you elaborate further?
  5. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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  6. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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  7. jdmcomp

    jdmcomp New Member

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    I find that using a pointed toothpick to put glue on the edges to be glued and letting them dry. Then use only a tiny bit of glue at one point to start. I spot one point first and then work around the edges glueing and aligning as I go. It is slow but it works. This I use to attach the front cowling of radial aircraft engine covers to the main cowling, or to make those spired nose cones into perfect (well, something like that) forms. Take time and allow each spot you glue to set before going to the next. I usually spot 6 to 8 points around a circle and then go back and spread the glue on the entire joint.

    By the way, coating the edges to be glued with a very thin coat and allowing to dry before glueing will make the join set very quickly.
  8. jdmcomp

    jdmcomp New Member

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    I find that using a pointed toothpick to put glue on the edges to be glued and letting them dry. Then use only a tiny bit of glue at one point to start. I spot one point first and then work around the edges glueing and aligning as I go. It is slow but it works. This I use to attach the front cowling of radial aircraft engine covers to the main cowling, or to make those spired nose cones into perfect (well, something like that) forms. Take time and allow each spot you glue to set before going to the next. I usually spot 6 to 8 points around a circle and then go back and spread the glue on the entire joint.

    By the way, coating the edges to be glued with a very thin coat and allowing to dry before glueing will make the join set very quickly.
  9. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use white glue (Elmer's TM). I squeeze some out onto a scrap of card, let it set for a couple of minutes so that it gets thick, sticky, and tacky, then apply it into an edge with a toothpick. After the join is set I might add some reinforcement glue to the inside of the seam if access is possible.
  10. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use white glue (Elmer's TM). I squeeze some out onto a scrap of card, let it set for a couple of minutes so that it gets thick, sticky, and tacky, then apply it into an edge with a toothpick. After the join is set I might add some reinforcement glue to the inside of the seam if access is possible.
  11. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    better results

    Thanks guys for answering my vague question. I have learned something from each post and have tried using the suggestions and the results are much better. The one thing that I found is important when using white glue is to pre-glue. I'm working on small stuff so a tooth pick is too big, have to use a needle tip. I know I could whittle down a tooth pick tip but I find cleaning the needle tip is much easier. John
  12. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    better results

    Thanks guys for answering my vague question. I have learned something from each post and have tried using the suggestions and the results are much better. The one thing that I found is important when using white glue is to pre-glue. I'm working on small stuff so a tooth pick is too big, have to use a needle tip. I know I could whittle down a tooth pick tip but I find cleaning the needle tip is much easier. John
  13. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I'm just slow...it is my perception that you were vague...apparently!:roll:
    Fortunately, the pro's came to my rescue!!! LOL
  14. thewoodengraver

    thewoodengraver Active Member

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    I'm just slow...it is my perception that you were vague...apparently!:roll:
    Fortunately, the pro's came to my rescue!!! LOL
  15. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    to thewoodenengraver

    No problem, I usually am vague. :) And as for being slow, don't feel bad.
    Most of my friends say I'm half-fast. At least that's what I think they're saying. :twisted: John
  16. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    to thewoodenengraver

    No problem, I usually am vague. :) And as for being slow, don't feel bad.
    Most of my friends say I'm half-fast. At least that's what I think they're saying. :twisted: John
  17. Teamski

    Teamski Member

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    Another method would be to cut out a doubler that would overlap the reverse side of the joining ends. Glue this to one side, let it dry. Then, glue the two pieces together. This works every time.

    -Ski
  18. Teamski

    Teamski Member

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    Another method would be to cut out a doubler that would overlap the reverse side of the joining ends. Glue this to one side, let it dry. Then, glue the two pieces together. This works every time.

    -Ski
  19. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    I like it

    Ski.............. that's a good tip. Gives more area to apply glue. Thanks, I'll give it a try next time. Why didn't I think of that? :oops: John
  20. johnflys2

    johnflys2 Member

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    I like it

    Ski.............. that's a good tip. Gives more area to apply glue. Thanks, I'll give it a try next time. Why didn't I think of that? :oops: John