Eastern Tn logging on the DG CC & W RR 1928

Discussion in 'Logging, Mining and Industrial Railroads' started by Bill Nelson, Dec 15, 2008.

  1. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    The Bogie is making progress. Going to have to work on its mechanism soon, so I can paint the frame and wheels.


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  2. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    The Bogie is nice. Very interesting linkage just below the bell? Is that a reversing lever????

    Doc Tom
  3. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    That is quite possibly an extremely convoluted reversing lever as it plugs into the valve gear. since the drive wheels are articulated under the boiler, and this lever comes in close to the pivot point, I guess they had to do something like that.
  4. Gandolf50

    Gandolf50 Researcher of obscure between war vehicles... Moderator

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    OK, I know nothing about trains but, I know how to ;)research... so this is what I found
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    Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn #6, an 1886 product of Mason Machine Works

    Mason's idea was to remove what American railroad men saw as the biggest disadvantages of the Fairlie - its cramped space for fuel and water caused by its double ended design (not very useful on American railroads where there was always ample room for a turntable, it's cramped cab caused by the joined double boilers, and to some degree its poor riding.

    He did this by removing one boiler of the double Fairlie and retaining only one power truck at the front. A much larger cab was fitted, and a fuel bunker and water tank behind the cab, supported by a trailing truck. The advantages of the Fairlie design were kept; the swivelling driven truck for a greater ability to negotiate curves, and the large open space between the trucks to fit a large firebox unrestricted by the wheels.

    The Mason Bogie was still, though, plagued by one of the biggest problems of the Fairlie - the jointed steam pipes to the driven truck leaked far too much steam. Mason eventually changed to a different scheme, in which the pivot point for the leading truck became a hollow ball joint through which the live steam for the cylinders passed. Mason also developed a sliding seal for the exhaust from the moving cylinder saddle into the smoke box. Although better, Mason's improvements took up much valuable space in between the driving wheels, forcing Mason to use an outside valve gear, generally the Walschaerts valve gear. Additionally, the reversing shaft had to be mounted atop the boiler, with a long lifting link dropping down to the radius rod, a feature unique to Mason Bogies (this was necessary because the lifting link would swing to the side as the truck pivoted, lifting the radius rod and changing the valve setting. Lengthening the link, and thus increasing the radius of its swing, minimized the amount of change). The Mason Bogie, a modified Fairlie locomotive of 1874, was the first to use the Walschaerts gear in North America.
    Oh, ,,,The Walschaerts valve gear is a type of valve invented by railway mechanical engineer Egide Walschaerts in 1844 used to regulate the flow of steam to the pistons in steam engines. It was extensively used from the late 19th century until the end of the steam era. The Walschaerts valve gear was slow to gain popularity. The Stephenson valve gear remained the most commonly used on 19th-century locomotives. However, the Walschaerts valve gear had the advantage that it could be mounted entirely on the outside of the locomotives, leaving the space between the frames clear; which resulted in it being adopted in some articulated locomotives. ..and that ends the history lesson for today... ( got a bit carried away... guess I do miss teaching , and I never said that!);)
  5. Bill Nelson

    Bill Nelson Well-Known Member

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    Got the other narrow gauge track in, may need to move it, some of my HOn3 logcars are wider than standard. Then I put in the rollaway.

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    I got out one of the Surry-Parkers, and got it set up, and started to set up the camp buildings.


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    Meanwhile over in the Gizzard, Biscuit Rock got a mini tower. This corner of the Wye is out of visual contact with the other two, and this is a busy area. Handy place to be able to give/get train orders.


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    This reminant of the old mountain fits right in


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  6. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    The beautiful Surry Parker looks right at home in that nice photo. Your are really making progress. Tom
  7. zathros

    zathros -----SENIOR---- Administrator Moderator

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    Boy, those steam engines must have been great for making Hot Dogs on the fly, and making Hot cups of coffee or Hot Chocolate. :)
  8. Doctor G

    Doctor G Active Member

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    Hi Bill. Really like seeing the Surry Parker at work again. Also your cables and lines to the machine to the machine are very realistic. What material are you using for the cables?? Doc Tom