Dulcote help needed

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by Sarge_7, Feb 5, 2008.

  1. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

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    I sprayed four of my UP units with dulcote. They looked awesome when it first went on, but when it dryed they developed whitish/gray spots all over them.wall1 I can't get pics to work right now(working on it) sorry. Any idea what I did wrong or how I can fix them with out having to start over:eek::cry: Thought about trying another coat or spraying another clear over one of them but figured I would ask here first.

    Jim
  2. nachoman

    nachoman Guest

    I've had this happen. I my case, I was using Krylon Matte Finish that had been in my paint box for about 3 years. It is an adequate dullcote alternative for when there is no LHS to get dullcote from. Anyway, my problem was exactly as yours. I would spray the model, and come back to find tiny white spots on it. It looked as if something like ash or dust had blown into the wet coating. It took mw a few tries to figure out it was the coating. I basically sprayed a piece of black wood and litterally watched it dry - and whadda ya know the white spots appeared out of nowhere!

    I determined the can of finish was bad, so I chucked it and got a new one. Problem solved.

    PS- Dullcote looks a little better to me than the krylon matte finish. Also, I prefer to use dullcote from an airbrush rather than from a rattle can because it sprays finer and looks better, IMO.

    Kevin
  3. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Well, if you are going to start over again anyway, you might try an experiment.

    I think that Kevin is on to something when he says the can might have gone "off".

    However, you might try heating the can - NOT VERY MUCH, and WITH WARM WATER ONLY (not by microwaving it or heating it on the stove!), and then shaking it for much longer than the recommended time to get the mix as smooth as possible. Make sure the tip is clean as well, and you do this in a fairly clean area so that nothing settles into the finish as it is drying.

    If that doesn't help, or makes things worse, you are still left with your original proposal to refinish it completely.

    Andrew
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I seem to recall reading somewhere about spraying the model with alcohol to remove the haze, although it might be a good idea to test first on something else before ruining anything even further. :rolleyes::-D

    Wayne
  5. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Isopropyl alcohol will create the haze, not remove it... Don't ask how I know... hamr ;) :D

    Andrew
  6. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

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    Thaor the help guys. I used an airbrush, but it sounds like it may have been an old bottle. I don't have a LHS so I will figure something out.
  7. Colton_modeler

    Colton_modeler Member

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    If you create haze unintentionally with alcohol, another coat of Dullcoat magically removes the haze - usually.
  8. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    There ya go!! Dullcote - haze - alcohol : I knew that there was some sorta connection. :p:rolleyes:hamrhamr;):-D:-D I think I need some alcohol. :twisted:;):-D

    Wayne
  9. Sarge_7

    Sarge_7 Member

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    Well, I don't know how the haze got there, but I did get some krylon matte clear and went back over them, cleared it up pretty good:thumb::thumb:

    Thanks again ya'll

    Jim
  10. rogerw

    rogerw Active Member

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    All I know for sure is if you drink to much alcohol they all look like models.
  11. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    I was working on a weathering job and when I used chalks and sealed it with Dulcote I got white discolored areas that had any thickness from the chalks. I started to think I need to trash the chalks and use weathering pigments only... and thoughts on this, do I need to only use expensive pigments and not the chalks I got from the art supply store? But now after reading this I'm thinking I only need to shake the dulcote can better or get some new Dulcote.
    What about where it’s said if you use alcohol then Dulcote the white film from the alcohol you get will vanish. I want that white film for a tanker I was going to weather next. Any ideas on how to get that white film that will not vanish when I seal the car with Dulcote or any other way to model weather that look?
  12. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    To get the haziness "white film", apply alcohol to the Dullcote after using the Dullcote to seal any other weathering.

    Andrew
  13. railBuilderdhd

    railBuilderdhd Member

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    and not have any worry about the alcohol not being sealed with anything?
  14. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Due to evaporation, the alcohol will be gone shortly after it "hazes" the Dullcote. There is no need to seal the effect; in fact, a repeat application of Dullcote after the alcohol will mostly reverse the effect...

    Andrew