Displaying models

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by jasco, Apr 23, 2006.

  1. shrike

    shrike Guest

    I did a set of custom shelves for mine, but then that's what I was doing as a job at the time, so it was cheaper, for me at least, than IKEA (which says a lot about our profit margins<G>!)
    I did build it around the 30" ID of the BILLY line of cases as IKEA's glass shelves are only $5 a pop, versus $30 for custom cut.
    The BILLY line has a couple different sizes and available glass doors. If you have an IKAE store handy, check their scratch and dent section to save up to half for prebuilt or used display items too.
  2. shrike

    shrike Guest

    I did a set of custom shelves for mine, but then that's what I was doing as a job at the time, so it was cheaper, for me at least, than IKEA (which says a lot about our profit margins<G>!)
    I did build it around the 30" ID of the BILLY line of cases as IKEA's glass shelves are only $5 a pop, versus $30 for custom cut.
    The BILLY line has a couple different sizes and available glass doors. If you have an IKAE store handy, check their scratch and dent section to save up to half for prebuilt or used display items too.
  3. 46rob

    46rob Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    0
    With over 150 models laying around here--the airplanes mostly hang from the ceiling. They're above window level--so sunlight fading them is less a problem--although the ink's gonna fade eventually anyway. Most of the structures are piled into a box. A few rest on shelves. Glass cases seem a bit pricey for my budget.....besides--I've got nothing of "musemum quality" anyway.
  4. 46rob

    46rob Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2005
    Messages:
    468
    Likes Received:
    0
    With over 150 models laying around here--the airplanes mostly hang from the ceiling. They're above window level--so sunlight fading them is less a problem--although the ink's gonna fade eventually anyway. Most of the structures are piled into a box. A few rest on shelves. Glass cases seem a bit pricey for my budget.....besides--I've got nothing of "musemum quality" anyway.
  5. sakrison

    sakrison Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    28
    More on displaying models

    My office in our 140-year-old house has 11-foot ceilings. That leaves a lot of room for hanging paper model aircraft, even with a ceiling fan. As the airspace gets crowded I'm thinking of other options:

    *Hanging aircraft flat against the wall--nose up, of course. (I'm a pilot--nose down would give me the willies.)
    *Building larger aircraft as fuselage-only models and mounting them on wall plaques.
    *Throwing them way high up in the air (only good for short periods).

    As for preserving models, we have a paper Osprey (the bird, not the aircraft) that my daughter and I built when she was 5. She's now 20 and the Osprey looks great--if a little dusty. (The room where it's hanging is not a/c-d and Wisconsin summers can be muggy.)

    For aircraft and similar models, I'm told that a coat of clear acrylic spray will help stablilize and protect the paper. So far, it's worked. I dust the models (infrequently and only outdoors) with a soft, wide artist's brush. Hatchoo!

    For your cats, I recommend flying lessons. It works for mine. Mostly.

    No worries...
  6. sakrison

    sakrison Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    436
    Likes Received:
    28
    More on displaying models

    My office in our 140-year-old house has 11-foot ceilings. That leaves a lot of room for hanging paper model aircraft, even with a ceiling fan. As the airspace gets crowded I'm thinking of other options:

    *Hanging aircraft flat against the wall--nose up, of course. (I'm a pilot--nose down would give me the willies.)
    *Building larger aircraft as fuselage-only models and mounting them on wall plaques.
    *Throwing them way high up in the air (only good for short periods).

    As for preserving models, we have a paper Osprey (the bird, not the aircraft) that my daughter and I built when she was 5. She's now 20 and the Osprey looks great--if a little dusty. (The room where it's hanging is not a/c-d and Wisconsin summers can be muggy.)

    For aircraft and similar models, I'm told that a coat of clear acrylic spray will help stablilize and protect the paper. So far, it's worked. I dust the models (infrequently and only outdoors) with a soft, wide artist's brush. Hatchoo!

    For your cats, I recommend flying lessons. It works for mine. Mostly.

    No worries...
  7. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Messages:
    522
    Likes Received:
    83
    Jasco,

    Interesting that this came up. I haven't been following this forum for awhile and thought I'd drop in to check on ideas for another display problem.

    I'm writing up a proposal for a exhibition of my work in an art gallery and need to figure out how to display my models in a gallery setting. I'm making ground-effect craft without any landing gear and so need to make stands for my models.

    Here is how I have them displayed as I work. These are all on my fireplace mantel in a row from oldest version to newest.

    Attached Files:

  8. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2005
    Messages:
    522
    Likes Received:
    83
    Jasco,

    Interesting that this came up. I haven't been following this forum for awhile and thought I'd drop in to check on ideas for another display problem.

    I'm writing up a proposal for a exhibition of my work in an art gallery and need to figure out how to display my models in a gallery setting. I'm making ground-effect craft without any landing gear and so need to make stands for my models.

    Here is how I have them displayed as I work. These are all on my fireplace mantel in a row from oldest version to newest.
  9. blueeyedbear

    blueeyedbear Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    My wife and I became full-time RVers when we both retired. Display space is zilch (or less). I gave all but 4 of my many plastic models to a local museum. The solution for displaying paper models is quite simple: I give them away to friends, relatives, and other people who need to find a place for them!!!


    :grin: Bob:grin:

    I failed to tell you guys how I displayed my plastic models before disposing of them.

    There were 1/72 scale models on every bit of open shelf space, when I built an XB-35! No empty space large enough unless I got rid of 3' of books, which is impossible for a teacher!!! The Wing found a temporary home in the kitchen, on top of the fridge.

    I happened see an inexpensive piece of furniture that was just what I needed. It as called, among other things, a china cabinet. This one was about 5.5' tall, 12" deep, and 3' wide. The front was mostly a curved glass door. The sides were also glass. The frame was wood, and the back was plywood with tracks and brackets for 5 adjustable glass shelves. I mounted a light in the top and had a local window and auto glass shop sell me more brackets and make two more shelves. It cost, all together, about $75 or $80.

    It held my entire collection, except for the B-1B (which finally wound up on top of the fridge!). That was around 30 models, nicely displayed in about 3 square feet of floor space.

    Check the discount and second-hand furniture shops. Lost of sizes and styles of glass cases are available.

    Bob
  10. blueeyedbear

    blueeyedbear Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    0
    My wife and I became full-time RVers when we both retired. Display space is zilch (or less). I gave all but 4 of my many plastic models to a local museum. The solution for displaying paper models is quite simple: I give them away to friends, relatives, and other people who need to find a place for them!!!


    :grin: Bob:grin:

    I failed to tell you guys how I displayed my plastic models before disposing of them.

    There were 1/72 scale models on every bit of open shelf space, when I built an XB-35! No empty space large enough unless I got rid of 3' of books, which is impossible for a teacher!!! The Wing found a temporary home in the kitchen, on top of the fridge.

    I happened see an inexpensive piece of furniture that was just what I needed. It as called, among other things, a china cabinet. This one was about 5.5' tall, 12" deep, and 3' wide. The front was mostly a curved glass door. The sides were also glass. The frame was wood, and the back was plywood with tracks and brackets for 5 adjustable glass shelves. I mounted a light in the top and had a local window and auto glass shop sell me more brackets and make two more shelves. It cost, all together, about $75 or $80.

    It held my entire collection, except for the B-1B (which finally wound up on top of the fridge!). That was around 30 models, nicely displayed in about 3 square feet of floor space.

    Check the discount and second-hand furniture shops. Lost of sizes and styles of glass cases are available.

    Bob
  11. hpept

    hpept Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    0
    yes blueeyedbearm this is a solution i've been recently started to think about, because space in the apartment is short and the model collection is growing up.
  12. hpept

    hpept Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2005
    Messages:
    357
    Likes Received:
    0
    yes blueeyedbearm this is a solution i've been recently started to think about, because space in the apartment is short and the model collection is growing up.