Dilemma....N vs HO

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by cpr_boy, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. cpr_boy

    cpr_boy Member

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    Hi all. I have somewhat of a dilemma. I've been modelling n scale for about a year now. The hobby is wonderful but I find 1) the locomotives need to be cleaned and maintained contantly to work properly and 2) my hands don't work well with modelling tiny things. True, you get more for any given space in nscale but I don't think it's quite for me

    I modelled HO 12 years ago and I'm ready to go back. There seems to be more modern desiels/rolling stock/structures avaliable to HO than N scale. Each scale has their adv. and disadv. I don't want to spend too much $$$ on N scale and find I switch later on.

    Any advice/opinions????

    cpr_boy
  2. Will_annand

    Will_annand Active Member

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    CPR, I switched to N scale because I did not have a large space to work with. I had an 11.5' by 6.5' alcove to work with and wanted more than a loop on a 4x8 sheet of plywood.

    From the layouts I have seen, and for my mind, you need lots of space to model anything interesting.

    That said, we have 2-3 fellows in our club who model more than one scale.
    One fellow has used his attic. his HO scale layout goes around at table height (36") and his N Scale goes around near the top of the wall (66").
  3. cpr_boy

    cpr_boy Member

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    That said, we have 2-3 fellows in our club who model more than one scale.
    One fellow has used his attic. his HO scale layout goes around at table height (36") and his N Scale goes around near the top of the wall (66").


    Mmm...best of both worlds. I like it!
  4. nachoman

    nachoman Guest

    I switched to HOn3 from standard gauge because the details and buldings are all still available and still the same size as HO, but I can fit more in a smaller space. I have an over/under figure 8 in a 3x6' space. One could build a rather elaborate HOn3 layout on a 4x8. I get by with 15" radius curves and 2-8-0s, which are not unprototypical.

    the drawback is that HOn3 requires scratchbuilding, kitbuilding or kitbashing rolling stock. There isn't much ready to run stuff.

    But if I was modeling anything in the diesel era, I think I would go with N. The long trains, multiple units, and broad curves of a modern mainline don't look as good in HO. Any missed details in the smaler size would be overcome by the more protypical scenery, curves, and distances, IMO.

    kevin
  5. Matthyro

    Matthyro Will always be re-membered

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    There is no qustion that so much more is available in HO and if you have the space for the layout you want then that would be my choice. I stick with N gauge as I have collected so much stuff that it doesn't make sense for me to change now.
    I do however have one of those optimizer magnifiers that fits over my glasses as without it, I could not do the tiny work that N gauge entails.
  6. tillsbury

    tillsbury Member

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    Opinion 1: I had the same problems, and was very disappointed with the reliability of locos. Solution: run only Kato locos, and use the Atlas and LL locos as either "towed" locos, or retired engines left on stub sidings... Problem gone.

    Opinion 2: I don't think there's a difference in scale working with tiny things. People get great results with tiny details on N scale, but some don't bother. Similarly, I've seen narrow-gauge O and S locos with incredible detail levels too... Trouble is, once you've see the good stuff either live or on forums, it raises the bar for your expectations. You (and only you) can lower that if you like. It doesn't matter about the scale, what matters is where you stop and where you're happy. You can go just as blind installing grabirons and brake details on HO rolling stock...

    Charles