Digitals Yamato

Discussion in 'Ship & Watercraft Models' started by jrts, May 14, 2004.

  1. Ajax

    Ajax Member

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    Yamato is looking stunning, Rob! Judging from the pictures, you'd never think the parts haven't been glued on yet - the fit is that good!

    AJ
  2. Ajax

    Ajax Member

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    *starts drooling like Pavlov's dog at the mere thought of "The Mighty 'ood" given the Digital Navy treatment*

    Um, make that 3 orders. :lol:

    AJ
  3. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi all

    Been at it again, done some touching up, lots to do yet.

    Started to fit out the hull from stern to bows with the smaller deck fittings.
    Some of the paint work is still wet so the camera flash has reflected of it.

    As some of you might guess it looks like HMS Hood is of the list :wink:
    So far it looks like USS Missouri is in front with two votes.

    More when I come in from work tonight.

    Regards

    Rob
  4. JRSeese

    JRSeese Member

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    She's a beaut! Wonderfully done, and the model is very nice on the eyes. I'm going to have to save my allowance.

    Josh
  5. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi all

    More deck fittings added
    More later

    Regards

    Rob
  6. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Rob

    Gets better every time is it a trick pf the camera or has Roman weathered the hull.

    barry
  7. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Barry

    Yes Roman did a great job of the weathering on this, including rust.

    The affect does look as good on camera as realy is.

    Regards

    Rob
  8. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Rob,
    I never realized how beautiful her lines are, and you are doing an extraordinary job of it!
    This is perhaps one of the most complex of the paper ship models I have seen out there, and it is coming out superbly. :D
    Thanks for keeping us updated on her, Rob!
    Jim
  9. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Thanks both of you.

    Forgot to say before, I have to do some soldering in the morning while I have the iron out I will build the lattice part of the crane. I will try to show how I do it with regard to other post on tinning up the work and jointing them with small amounts of heat.

    Jim
    I will try to nick the other halfs frame of her for doing the rails and post a photo.

    Regards

    Rob
  10. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi all

    Last one for tonight

    Another turret in place, just some small bits and a touch up to do on it.

    Regards

    Rob
  11. Ajax

    Ajax Member

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    Yamato keeps looking better and better, Rob! The cranes on the stern and guns look excellent! :)

    AJ
  12. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    :D

    Hi all

    As promised this is how I do my masts and lattice work.
    If some of you have a better way of doing it please let me know ?

    I have tried to do this using materials and tools that most of use will have at home or can borrow. :wink:

    The wire I have used is an old coax cable of TV.
    First strip out the wire, don't worry if you bend it.
    Then get two metal rods and loop the wire around them, put one on the floor and stand on it, the other in your hand. Giving a slight tug and wist at the same time, this will remove all the kinks from the wire.

    Next step
  13. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Next

    As this model comes on CD I was able to print of three sheets.
    One for cutting, one for soldering on and the third for laying the parts on so you know where you are upto. If you can't do this you will need to draw out the shapes.

    Next
  14. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Next

    The first photo shows the diff between plumbers solder and low temp elec solder. you can even get liquid solder but I don't like this stuff.

    First thing to do is to tin up the wire.
    Leave the iron in it's holder and put a small amount of flux on the tip then some solder. Then brush some flux on to the wire
    When doing this I think it is best to take the wire to the iron not the other way round. This gives you two hands to work with.
    The small blob next to the iron is liquid flux.

    Next

    Run the wire under the iron in one movement, try not to stop as this will give an un-even finish to the wire.

    The third photo shows a half tinned wire so you can see the diff.

    Next
  15. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Next

    Lay the parts one at a time on the pattern and using a very quick dab with the iorn let the joint have some heat. The heat will transfer very quick, so for your fingers health use tweezers to pick it up afterwards.
    DON'T RUN IT UNDER WATER TO COOL AS THIS WILL WARP
    IT!!!!! :shock:

    Long winded I know, but it works

    Hope this has been some help

    Regards

    Rob
  16. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Thanks, Rob!

    I have toyed with the idea of trying soldering for some time now but just did not find any "ABC's of soldering" out there to get me over that first hump.

    Just a few questions, if I might. (Okay, here they come. :wink: )

    We are working with a small wire joint and I was wondering how you know there is enough solder transfered to the joint when you touch the soldering iron to it, is that what the "tinning" of the wire itself does, and do you find sufficient solder is involved in using the tinned method?

    So, is the end result of the tinning of the wire that you create a coating of solder which is then quickly softened and melted at the joint when you dab it?

    Do you tin the shorter lengths too, or add flux to them, or do you tin just the main wire, the legs of the lattice work in this case?

    How do you avoid undoing a joint if you need to make another joint up the wire a bit; how do you stop the first joint from being un-done when you touch the next joint?

    Okay, that's enough of that... :D

    I suppose, on reflection, it's a matter of practice, feel and experience, but any clarification you might be able to suggest would be appreciated.

    Can you tell I'm a novice at this? :lol:
    Jim
  17. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    Hi Jim

    First

    When you put the solder on to the iron, if you look under the iron as you do it you will see a blob start to form. If you use to much it will just drop off. One small blob of solder will cover a wire of 0.25mm, 8cm long.
    I tin up the wire before I cut the small bits. The reason for running the wire under the iron is so all the wire gets an even coat of solder.

    As for jointing, when you have soldered bits together it's just a knack of not using to much heat. If you have two or three bits together you have to set this up as one hit with the iron.

    The whole wire is tinned before you start to cut.

    Regards

    Rob
  18. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    :D

    Jim

    One finished side
    Have not done this for ages either

    Regards

    Rob
  19. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Thanks, Rob!

    And that would include a joint where you need to solder the OTHER end of the little piece to the other leg, right? I guess what I am trying to figure out is how to avoid putting too much heat at the next joint to avoid the first joint loosening up by mistake, particularly when dealing with those short pieces that are soldered to each leg, and you have a number of those little legs, getting smaller and smaller as you get to the top of the structure. Have you found the amount of heat you are using for the joint does not conduct so fast as to make any of this a real problem?

    The tinning of the wire is something I had not seen or considered before, I have heard of tinning the soldering iron, but not the wire itself; it makes a lot of sense given the small joints to do it this way. Great tips! :D
    Can't wait to see your finished lattice work!

    I've got to get me some wire, solder, plug in the iron and practice!
    Take the kids out for the afternoon, Honey, and lock up the pets, I'm a gonna be soldering today!! :lol:
    Jim
  20. jrts

    jrts Active Member

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    :D

    Your welcome

    Rob