Digital Photo Backdrops

Discussion in 'Photos & Videos' started by bigdonnie, Aug 9, 2005.

  1. bigdonnie

    bigdonnie Member

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    I imagine many of you have seen the article in the latest issue of MRR. I was impressed by the amazing depth that this backdrop added to what started out as a relatively narrow and visually uninteresting scene.

    I've never tried doing this, but after reading this article, I am definitely going to play around with this backdrop technique.

    If anyone has successfully done this, perhaps you could share your experiences with us?

    I am particularly interested in how you can use photo editing software like Photoshop to adjust picture size so that it is appropriate for the scale you are modelling in.
    For example, I would like to try and create a backdrop for my small N scale coffee table layout.

    Any experiences appreciated.
  2. Marxed

    Marxed Member

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    i'm assuming you mean adding the backdrop in after the picture is taken?


    it's not to hard with some photoshop know-how, and it's kinda fun to do actually :D



    here's an example of one i've done

    http://www.the-gauge.com/showthread.php?t=15011
  3. MasonJar

    MasonJar It's not rocket surgery

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    Donnie,

    My digicam is not up to making big backdrops - resolution is too low, 'cuz the camera is too old...!

    However, I have used Adobe PhotoShop Elements to manipulate those (non-RR) photos I have taken. This is a simple program to use - much better than PhotoShop itself, as the functions have been grouped for use with "camera images", as opposed to strictly free-form.

    One thing I think is important in backdrops is not to make them so realistic and spectacular that they take away from the trains. This is a risk when using photos for backdrops (in my opinion).

    Another point to remember is the perspective. There are many (commercial) backdrops that I have seen that do not match the perspective of the layout. You can see this when you look at (for example) a model building - you can see the roof from the angle that you normally view the layout. But the building on the backdrop, right next to it, has a completely different perspective, and you cannot see the roof. A bit of a discontinuity, in my opinion.

    However, with digital manipulation, you should be able to correct these and any other problems. Looking forward to your reports! :D

    Andrew
  4. Sunburn

    Sunburn Member

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    Backdrop Photos

    A couple years ago, I was designing a book cover for work and came across this site. It has great source material for backdrops, assuming you have the skills and software to work with them. GOOD STUFF!!

    http://www.morguefile.com/