[construction report] Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VIII (KS 5)

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by Swinger, Feb 11, 2005.

  1. Swinger

    Swinger Member

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    Here, I'm not going to build any super-model. This is a kind of an experimental built, so I won't make too many changes in this simple model. The main reasons to start builiding this aircraft were:

    1. Test of an acrylic varnish (in spray).

    2. Checking if the parts fit (I intend to built it in future, with many changes to the original design).

    3. I needed to see the fast effects of my work - only the stabilizers of the Ju 88 had taken me a few days to build them... Aaaaargh! :)

    OK, let's get to the point.

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    This is the Kartonowy Świat, issue no 5 (16 April 2003) - Supermarine Spitfire Mk. VIII of Royal Australian Air Force, designed by Marek Pacyński (the same design with various changes was released in many other series, too). It was Clive Caldwell's personal aircraft. I've found three probable mistakes - the serial number is too small, there are markings of German and Japanese shotdowns only (instead of 3,5 German should be Italian ones) and the tail wheel should be retractable, not fixed.

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    Here's the front part of the fuselage - I had some problems with fitting the segments... By the way - parts in this model are designed to be cut out by the outer side of the black lines. I try to do it by the inner sides, to make the lines less visible - unfortunately these slits in the lower part of the fuselage should have been cut in the way designed originally... Now I haven't got the fuselage curved in a proper way... ;(

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    The tail segment...


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    Problems with fitting again...


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    The cockpit is scanned from another Spitfire, printed on a B&W laser printer, and painted green (should be grayish green, but this is not to be a super-model :) rather a relaxing one). The seatbelts are made of aluminium foil.


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    Cockpit in the fuselage...


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    The parts must always be being formed very carefully.


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    The fuselage.


    And now I've made the horizontal stabilizer.

    This strip has been removed to make the parts fit better:
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    This way I have cut the rudder:
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    Finished stabilizer:
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  2. gera

    gera Member

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    Great construction.......Congrats :eek: :D
  3. lunarhighway

    lunarhighway Member

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    wow! that's a very clean build!!!
    I noticed you did something with the rudder...the rib structure seems to be embossed...looks great!...Could you please explain how you did that?

    happy modeling and relaxing with the rest of this great model :)
  4. jasco

    jasco Member

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    Well, Swinger, your "relaxing build" outshines my "fret for a fortnight" attempts. Lovely work. BTW, how do you form the fuselage parts without embossing the outline of the connector strips? Glue the strips in after forming?
  5. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    This is a joy to watch! Have you sprayed it already? At the risk of being proven wrong, it seems that way - theres a very nice semi-flat tone on the surface. Great fin & rudder, and very nice mending of those bad fits.

    Leif
  6. bfam4t6

    bfam4t6 Member

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    Swinger,
    Compared to my models, this is a "super model" after all. Everything is extremely clean and neat. You've done a great job so far.
  7. barry

    barry Active Member

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    Think I will give up modelng and just watch the masters

    barry
  8. Jimi

    Jimi Member

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    So nice, clean and crisp esp. the v-stabilizer. (gives me an idea) hehehe.
  9. bholderman

    bholderman Member

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    Sheesh, even your experimental stuff looks better than anything I've done so far.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  10. Jim Krauzlis

    Jim Krauzlis Active Member

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    Swinger your "just for fun" build just floors me! :D

    Another brilliant thread and a joy to watch.

    Please treat us all to more! :D

    Cheers!

    Jim
  11. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    Swinger, in your rudder construction, is there a strip or something on the mating surfaces of the moving part of the rudder or the stationary part? Or are the 2 pieces open and just so close that the openings into each part can not be seen? This is excellant work and your experimentation far exceeds my regular "blue ribbon" builds. Thankyou for the lessons :!:
  12. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Swinger,

    Hope your new eyeglasses workout cause we're waiting for the rest...,

    Gil
  13. Swinger

    Swinger Member

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    Hi,

    I'm glad you like the model, thanks! At first I would like to explain that just because this is a relaxing model, that doesn't mean I won't try hard to build it cleanly and precisely. The relaxing character implicates not dying for making it as detailed as the real Spitfire. ;-) In other words, I don't care so much about the similarity to the original aircraft. However, the model does have to look neat.

    You've asked some questions. Here I go with the answers:

    Lunarhighway - yes, the ribs were embossed with a needle, from the other side of course. The other lines were embossed on the coloured side. I'll show the technique on photos (as soon as I complete the horizontal stabilizers).

    Jasco - What do you mean by "embossing the outline of the connector strips"? Well... Firstly I form the segment, then I add the connector strip (the one to glue the segment into a "circle"), then I glue the segment into a "circle", and then I glue in the other connector strip. Lastly, I put the former in (and of course, finally I glue the segment to the rest of the fuselage).

    Leif - yes, the varnish has been sprayed on before cutting the model. Then again, I still don't know whether to spray it again when I finish the model... I'll try it on some wrecked models, maybe it will be good. The varnish was glossy, but somehow it soaked into the card... :)

    Barry - no way, don't even think about that. :) Each of your models is better than the previous one.

    CmdrTed - I really am sorry, but I don't understand which place you are writing about. :( Which are "mating surfaces" and "openings"?

    P.S. On the Konradus forum I was asked to write/show how I formed the stabilizers... Now I'm making the horizontal stabilizers and I take a lot of photos, so stay tuned for a little tutorial. :) Maybe tomorrow, maybe on monday. :) Just when I finish them.
  14. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Swinger,

    So much for a relaxing build...,

    Gil
  15. lunarhighway

    lunarhighway Member

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    The class eagerly awaits the next lesson :lol:


    thanks for taking the time to explain it all!
  16. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    Swinger, I think a second coat of spraying when finished is good. It helps to cover joints, and evens out any irregularities (although you'll have to mask the canopy, of course). However, be warned about glossy sprays! Please use matte or semi-matte. I think you were lucky that the glossy spray soaked into the paper. The second coat won't, I'm afraid. - Leif
  17. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    The glossy sprays have a tendency to "spot gloss" on paper. It takes several coats for the gloss to even out. I've stopped using it as it is more temperature sensitve than the matte spray.

    Gil
  18. Swinger

    Swinger Member

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    "Spot gloss", that's right! This effect can be seen on some of the photos. Live these spots are visible mainly in an incandescent light. Unfortunately when I was in the shop, there was only the glossy spray. I wanted to buy the semi-matt, but oh well... I don't think that at the next spraying it would be glossy - I've made some tests, and even this Spit was covered with 4 thin layers of varnish. Anyway, I'd prefer the semi-matt one, to get rid of these glossy spots (though they don't make a tragedy). :)

    Gil, what do you mean by "temperature sensitive"? What's going on with the glossy varnish in various temperatures?


    OK, and now the photos. I've been making the stabilizers for the first time this way, as well as it was my first time to cut (divide) the rudders out. So it is an experiment, too.

    OK, here we go:

    1. I put PVA onto the edges with a needle. Then, at once, I rub the edge with a finger to remove the glue. A little amount of it remains soaked in the card.

    [​IMG]


    2. I sand the edges (the vertical stabilizer was sanded manually). After sanding the sanded edges are treated with PVA again.

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    3. I form the edge using a metal rod.

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    4. I make the concave lines (on a hard pad).

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    5. I push the part with a mouse on a mouse pad to make it slightly rounded (it's not necessary, can be done in one's fingers)

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    6. I make the convex lines (on a soft pad, here 2mm cardboard).

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    7. I form the endings on a rubber gum (eraser).

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    8. The lower side...

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    9. And the upper. A hole in the tip is filled with acrylic putty (later painted).

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    10. Rudders (or maybe it is called elevators? Or a different word?).

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    11. The parts linking the stabilizers to the fuselage. I have made them smaller. Maybe it wasn't necessary, but I don't like them big.

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    12. The finished tail.

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  19. Leif Oh

    Leif Oh Member

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    What an extraordinary useful and instructional manual. Thank you! A number of techniques that I'm sure will be incorporated as the future standard techniques by many, including me.

    If I may intercede on Gil's behalf, the temperature-sensitivity is exactly about spray varnish becoming spotty in low temperatures. This is a problem also encountered in real-life spraying of butyrate dope on aircraft, although then the problem arises from too high humidity (if I remember correctly).

    However, I've unexpectedly encountered the problem of spottiness also in room-temperatures, and the only solution then was to change make of spray. I use spray for sheets before cutting because it's so convenient for large surfaces. Finished, or half-finished, models are varnished with small brushes matte clear acrylic, which makes it possible to varnish just parts or sections of the model as you go along. (And yes, I use water-soluble varnish, although I know that is anathema to most paper modelers.)

    Just a thought on the fairings for the horizontal stab and elevators - it might be an idea to use thinner paper there, to simulate a more realistic thickness of the aluminium sheeting used on the full-size aircraft. I haven't tried that yet either, but it would seem to pay off, particularly in such a small scale as 1/50.

    Many thanks again for all the superb tips, and for taking the trouble to demonstrate them so clearly and convincingly. (This is actually the first time I got the point about the eraser - when you've shown us that little neat trick before, I actually thought you used a pen-shaped eraser as a tool!)

    Amazing to see, in the last picture, how small the model is. The only thing indicating the small scale is the coarseness of the printed pattern - the level of craftmanship would rather indicate 1/16 than 1/50!

    Leif
  20. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Hello All,

    Some of the clear coat sprays, whether gloss, semi-gloss or matte, will have a tendency to either "spot gloss" or "white or milk out" if temperature conditions are not right. Leif referred to aircraft dope at high temperatures having a similar effect. This is due to high humidity which also effects clear coats. I've found that allowing the spray can to come to room temperature or a little above helps eliminate most effects but I still experience problems with the gloss clear coat on paper as the amount required to achieve a gloss finish makes the paper feel like a piece of polyethelyene plastic.

    I've taken to using lacquer sanding sealer to stiffen the paper for sanding and to waterproof the paper for use with acrylic fillers. This needs to be used with ventilation as some are sensitive or will be annoyed by the aromatics. Lacquer quickly penetrates the paper and is fast drying. The finished resultant composite is stiff and sands beautifully. The source of this is fairly low cost, look for lacquer sanding sealer.

    Last, but certainly not least, thank you Swinger for showing a spectacular build and construction technique..., magnificent!

    Best regards, Gil