Clutter for Val and anyone`s yard

Discussion in 'HO Scale Model Trains' started by interurban, Apr 3, 2004.

  1. interurban

    interurban Active Member

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    Val you wanted pictures of clutter for you two model??
    Here you go you will find more in the old post McCowan yard visit:wave:
    These I took last week.
    The approach to the Hump , lot of nature to model:D

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  2. interurban

    interurban Active Member

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    This shot you see a lot of new parts at the ready for jobs in the "fix it" shop:p

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  3. interurban

    interurban Active Member

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    And one last look. I love the C P Beaver decal.
    Cheers:wave:

    btw do you see the blue flag!!!!;) It tells you it`s a busy track keep off.

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  4. brakie

    brakie Active Member

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    Chris,To my mind details make our layouts believable. One can have a small industrial switching layout that can be built plain and look good or one can super detail that layout and have a super nice layout.

    Look at it this way.Its all "eye candy"( I call it the Hollywood affect) you see..A visitor will be looking at your detailed layout and and believe the layout is bigger then what it really is.You see the eye is drawn to the details and mini scenes and not the layout as a whole.Now add detailed cars and engines like we buy today and it completes the trickery.:D
  5. interurban

    interurban Active Member

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    Agreed Larry. I try to treat each foot of layout much like a stage for actors, so all the props should be in place, this may take time as we learn more about this wonderful hobby.
    It`s wonderful to see the actors move through the scenes you creat be it steam diesel or electric overhead!:D
  6. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Thanks for the shots Chris!!! I agree that clutter is absolutely essential for creating a believable scene, in the same way that weathering is.

    We humans constantly filter our perceptions. We literally see and hear only what we want to. That's why when you make a tape recording and play it back, you suddenly hear all the background noise that you have "filtered out".

    If those things are not there, we may not be aware at a conscious level, but something will be missing, and the scene lacks believability. As an artist, I have spent my life being observant of little details such as the way light falls, etc. Since I started my layout, I find my observation skills have had to be sharpened even more, to take note of things I previously ignored. Things like trash piles, boxes, rust, dirt, and the various ways things fall into disrepair.

    For me, that has been a side of the hobby that has affected everything I do. I can barely drive down the street anymore without studying the city details around me. Not so good for driving, but great for model reference!!!!

    Val
  7. Papa Bear

    Papa Bear Member

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    More Ideas

    Val, here are some more ideas for you. This locomotive servicing track in Pensacola, FL has a lot going on in a small space. For a model, all those poles could get in the way of those 1:1 hands that occasionally fly over the layout, but you might want to have a few strategically placed for effect.

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  8. Papa Bear

    Papa Bear Member

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    These tracks connect the yard in Pensacola to some industries. I like the shed and the ties left in place from the abandoned track.
    John

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  9. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Cool!!! Thanks John. I like the abandoned ties idea a lot!!! That's something I've never seen modelled.

    Val
  10. jon-monon

    jon-monon Active Member

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    If you have an MOW track along your yard, you might add track, ties and associated debris. This MOW track ends at the pile of ties. Haven't seen it for a while, but there used to be a gondo parked over the open pit (barely visible here) and several orange track gizmos.

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  11. jon-monon

    jon-monon Active Member

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    And if hte gandy dancers are really active, as they were here until so recently, you may want to add lots of rail.

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  12. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    That's great Jon - thanks for the pics! Adding some ties and rails along the tracks seems like a very easy project to do. I'm going to try it RIGHT NOW!!!

    :thumb: Val
  13. brakie

    brakie Active Member

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    There is a lot to be said in those last 2 photos that Papa posted..Nptice the lack of road bed..The run down look.The wealth of other details.Such is what bring a layout into believability.I believe we modelers can get to involved in building a perfect layout where everything is nice and tidy and forget the lesions that life has taught us concerning what the real world we live in looks like.The best scenery expert is none other then Mother Nature all we need to do is observe the way she does things..
    Val is 100% correct when she said:

    We humans constantly filter our perceptions. We literally see and hear only what we want to. That's why when you make a tape recording and play it back, you suddenly hear all the background noise that you have "filtered out".

    If those things are not there, we may not be aware at a conscious level, but something will be missing, and the scene lacks believability. As an artist, I have spent my life being observant of little details such as the way light falls, etc. Since I started my layout, I find my observation skills have had to be sharpened even more, to take note of things I previously ignored. Things like trash piles, boxes, rust, dirt, and the various ways things fall into disrepair.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Those I believe are the words to model by.
  14. spitfire

    spitfire Active Member

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    Quick question

    What's the correct scale length for track sections? I have the number 39 ft in my head -- is this right? (I'm going to be shocked if it is!)

    Val
  15. 60103

    60103 Pooh Bah

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    Val, 39 ft was the standard length for ages. It fit neatly in 40 ft cars!
    It is exact for your era.
    However, rail could be recycled by cutting the ends off, as the bolt holes were weak points. I remember photos of used track being made in to Welded Rail by cutting off the holes and then welding on site.
    There are lots of places along the tracks where a small pile of rails would be left, set on concrete blocks or old bits of tie. If you go to West Toronto Junction, there is a large collection of spare rail (NE corner). (Take an escort!) There are also spare crossing frogs in the odd angles required by the junction. Not sure if they are new or old ones being kept in case of accident.