Cardstock Trebuchet

Discussion in 'Internet Finds' started by SCEtoAux, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    What kind of glue did you use for the trebuchet pouch in shelia's build? I am defintely going that route. I think I will make two at the same time and see which one turns out better, one with elmers and one with uhu. I think my CA is all dried up, havent opened it in about 7 years :D
    Chris
  2. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    What kind of glue did you use for the trebuchet pouch in shelia's build? I am defintely going that route. I think I will make two at the same time and see which one turns out better, one with elmers and one with uhu. I think my CA is all dried up, havent opened it in about 7 years :D
    Chris
  3. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Well, for Sheila's model I used plain white Elmer's, for Fryer's I used Elmer's Wood Glue that has a brown color to it for one and TiteBond II Weather Proof Premium Wood Glue that has a yellow color to it for another. If the pouches ever fail it is easy enough to make more. Dabs of glue at the points where the string crosses seem to work out.

    The string I used is just some small twine. It will fit through a 1/16" hole with room to spare, so maybe it is 1/32'' diameter. It will fit in the space between the mm markings on a ruler.

    I made some out of cloth that have the same shape as the first one on Ripcord's Slings and Pouches page (the brown leather looking one). Not much sewing is needed, just the two points on the sides. You can even just tie the sling to each end instead of using the holes and/or grommets mentioned.
    :)
  4. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Well, for Sheila's model I used plain white Elmer's, for Fryer's I used Elmer's Wood Glue that has a brown color to it for one and TiteBond II Weather Proof Premium Wood Glue that has a yellow color to it for another. If the pouches ever fail it is easy enough to make more. Dabs of glue at the points where the string crosses seem to work out.

    The string I used is just some small twine. It will fit through a 1/16" hole with room to spare, so maybe it is 1/32'' diameter. It will fit in the space between the mm markings on a ruler.

    I made some out of cloth that have the same shape as the first one on Ripcord's Slings and Pouches page (the brown leather looking one). Not much sewing is needed, just the two points on the sides. You can even just tie the sling to each end instead of using the holes and/or grommets mentioned.
    :)
  5. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    What other siege engines have you made? You sure have a handle on trebuchets :)
    Thanks again!
    Chris
  6. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    What other siege engines have you made? You sure have a handle on trebuchets :)
    Thanks again!
    Chris
  7. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    The paper model seige engines I have built have been mainly trebuchets.

    I have made a bunch of wooden trebuchets and mangonels. You have to be careful with those things because you can hurt yourself or someone else if you don't respect the force they can generate.:razz: Them ancient folks kinda knew what they were doing. I was surprised with how much force the twisted rope could generate when I built the mangonel.

    Even small tabletop size mangonels using some twisted cotton twine are powerful. I built one with a base 6" x 4". I made a 6" long throwing arm in the shape of a spoon. I used 32 feet of small cotton twine for the motive force and made a skein that is 6" long. The projectiles used are made of those aluminum Hershey's Kisses or Dove Dark Chocolate wrappers scrunched together into a ball, about 3/4" diameter. Tensioned just right, the mangonel throws them to 40+ feet, depending on the wind.

    You could break a finger if you get one caught between the throwing arm and the cross bar when it is fully tensioned.:shock:
  8. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    The paper model seige engines I have built have been mainly trebuchets.

    I have made a bunch of wooden trebuchets and mangonels. You have to be careful with those things because you can hurt yourself or someone else if you don't respect the force they can generate.:razz: Them ancient folks kinda knew what they were doing. I was surprised with how much force the twisted rope could generate when I built the mangonel.

    Even small tabletop size mangonels using some twisted cotton twine are powerful. I built one with a base 6" x 4". I made a 6" long throwing arm in the shape of a spoon. I used 32 feet of small cotton twine for the motive force and made a skein that is 6" long. The projectiles used are made of those aluminum Hershey's Kisses or Dove Dark Chocolate wrappers scrunched together into a ball, about 3/4" diameter. Tensioned just right, the mangonel throws them to 40+ feet, depending on the wind.

    You could break a finger if you get one caught between the throwing arm and the cross bar when it is fully tensioned.:shock:
  9. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    Got plans? Never heard of one myself.... Course maybe I have seen them and just thought they were catapults like I thought a trebuchet was a catapult....
    Chris
  10. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    Got plans? Never heard of one myself.... Course maybe I have seen them and just thought they were catapults like I thought a trebuchet was a catapult....
    Chris
  11. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Nah, no plans for a mangonel. I just looked at a bunch of pictures and used some scrap wood and other stuff to make the thing.

    Do a web search for mangonel or onager and you will get a bunch of good info. I saw a picture once of a mangonel made out of popsicle sticks, a rubber band, and a plastic spoon. Can't seem to find it now.:(
    :)
  12. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Nah, no plans for a mangonel. I just looked at a bunch of pictures and used some scrap wood and other stuff to make the thing.

    Do a web search for mangonel or onager and you will get a bunch of good info. I saw a picture once of a mangonel made out of popsicle sticks, a rubber band, and a plastic spoon. Can't seem to find it now.:(
    :)
  13. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    Shelia's String pouch works like a charm! Thanks Doug - turned out to be a great little model once I had the directions and your tips. My daughter wants me to print another one so she can color it before I put it together. It has help up to at least 20 tosses with no noticable wear on 44 lb paper. Just thought you might like to know!
    Thanks again,
    Chris
  14. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    Shelia's String pouch works like a charm! Thanks Doug - turned out to be a great little model once I had the directions and your tips. My daughter wants me to print another one so she can color it before I put it together. It has help up to at least 20 tosses with no noticable wear on 44 lb paper. Just thought you might like to know!
    Thanks again,
    Chris
  15. leehound

    leehound New Member

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    Is there a place on this site that models are stored for anyone to download? Something thats call the "Parts Bin"? I can't seem to find it.

    Thanks
  16. leehound

    leehound New Member

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    Is there a place on this site that models are stored for anyone to download? Something thats call the "Parts Bin"? I can't seem to find it.

    Thanks
  17. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    No, its not there. We dont have permission from the original creator and no one can seem to get ahold of him. Check your pm....
    Chris
  18. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    No, its not there. We dont have permission from the original creator and no one can seem to get ahold of him. Check your pm....
    Chris
  19. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Yep, those little trebs are fun to play around with. :)
    A while back I made a few of them so some school kids could have some fun and learn something too. Kind of like a physics class without them aware of it.:-D

    Here are some tips to improve hurling performance:

    Changing the angle of the paperclip :
    A more hooked paperclip will hold the sling loop longer than a straighter one.
    A paperclip less hooked or in line with the throwing arm = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    more hooked or forward-pointing = later release = flatter trajectory

    By changing the length of the cords that hold the sling pouch:
    If the sling is rotating around the end of the throwing arm slowly, the throwing arm will have time to swing through a bigger arc before the sling catches up to it. If the sling is rotating quickly, the release angle will happen earlier.
    A shorter sling will rotate faster than a long sling.
    Short sling cords = fast sling rotation = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    long sling cords = slow sling rotation = later release = flatter trajectory

    By choosing the size of your shot:
    Another thing that influences when a sling releases is the force on it - a heavier projectile tends to pull the loop off the prong earlier than a lighter projectile does.
    Heavy projectile = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    light projectile = later release = flatter trajectory

    I haven't had as much fun leading up to hurling since I was in college.:-D :lol:
  20. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Yep, those little trebs are fun to play around with. :)
    A while back I made a few of them so some school kids could have some fun and learn something too. Kind of like a physics class without them aware of it.:-D

    Here are some tips to improve hurling performance:

    Changing the angle of the paperclip :
    A more hooked paperclip will hold the sling loop longer than a straighter one.
    A paperclip less hooked or in line with the throwing arm = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    more hooked or forward-pointing = later release = flatter trajectory

    By changing the length of the cords that hold the sling pouch:
    If the sling is rotating around the end of the throwing arm slowly, the throwing arm will have time to swing through a bigger arc before the sling catches up to it. If the sling is rotating quickly, the release angle will happen earlier.
    A shorter sling will rotate faster than a long sling.
    Short sling cords = fast sling rotation = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    long sling cords = slow sling rotation = later release = flatter trajectory

    By choosing the size of your shot:
    Another thing that influences when a sling releases is the force on it - a heavier projectile tends to pull the loop off the prong earlier than a lighter projectile does.
    Heavy projectile = earlier release = higher trajectory;
    light projectile = later release = flatter trajectory

    I haven't had as much fun leading up to hurling since I was in college.:-D :lol: